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2nd annual Car Giveaway event

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

PURPOSE:

We are seeking nominations for someone in need of a good, used vehicle to get back and forth to work, school or medical appointments, who can afford to own a vehicle, but can’t afford to buy one.

TO NOMINATE SOMEONE:

Mail (or drop off) your Letters of Nomination before March 31, 2019 to:

Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal, VA 22630

Winner to be announced Good Friday, April 19, 2019

PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING:

  1. Please do not nominate yourself.
  2. Nominee must be at least 21 years of age and live within 20 miles of The Auto Care Clinic.
  3. Please include your contact information (name/address/phone) as well as the contact information (name/address/phone) for the person you are nominating.
  4. Please include why you feel the nominee is in need of a vehicle.
  5. Friends, family and employees of Bill Long’s Auto Care Clinic are not eligible.
  6. Vehicle must be insured, licensed and registered to the winner before receiving the vehicle.
  7. Vehicle is in good, used condition, as-is, without expressed or implied warranty. The Auto Care Clinic is not responsible for additional repairs, pre-existing or unforeseen, regarding the vehicle presented.

Good luck to all nominees!

EDA in Focus

Legal questions surround Town offer of one-time, recoverable FRPD payment

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

Without accepting any responsibility for the nearly $9-million cost of its new police headquarters building, at a hastily called Tuesday evening Special Meeting to accommodate the turn of the fiscal year today, Wednesday, July 1st, the Front Royal Town Council unanimously approved a “Reservation of Rights Agreement” allowing the Town to pay a portion of the first debt service payment of Fiscal Year 2021 on that Town/EDA capital improvement project. The project was completed in October 2018 and the Town has yet to compensate the EDA for any of its costs in financing the project as will be elaborated on below.

Also approved during the eight-minute meeting prior to an adjournment to closed session for personnel matters believed to be the first of two town managers interviews scheduled this week, was an extension past June 30, and alteration to the contract payment terms of Interim Town Manager Matt Tederick. That will be covered in a separate Royal Examiner story.

Councilman Jake Meza says the Town saved about $50,000 by hiring Matt Tederick as a contractor, but as of July 1 that arrangement no longer exists. Royal Examiner photos and video by Mark Williams.

As to the Reservation of Rights Agreement with Warren County, the authorized one-time payment of $10,528.95 covers half of the Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority’s interest-only payment of approximately $21,102 due at the July 1st start of FY-2021.

Contacted Wednesday morning, EDA Executive Director Doug Parson explained the EDA’s loan to facilitate construction of the Town Police headquarters have thus far been interest-only payments based on a 30-day month. That will change on November 1, when the United Bank loan moves to principal and interest payments. Parsons estimated that would take the monthly payments to about $50,000 from the $21,000 interest-only range.

The United Bank’s interest rate on the loan is 3%. However, the town council has taken the legal stance that it should only have to pay a 30-year, 1.5% interest rate it asserts was verbally promised to it by former EDA Executive Director Jennifer McDonald. As previously reported by Royal Examiner, that 1.5% rate was tied to the construction project qualifying for a 30-year New Market Tax Credit Program (NMTC) loan with a nine-year waiver of interest payments. However, the NMTC program loans are for municipal capital improvement projects that create new jobs, which the FRPD project did not.

Councilwoman Lori Athey Cockrell took the opportunity of council’s passage of the agreement facilitating a one-time, half monthly payment on the FRPD debt service as an indicator that the council and its staff are working proactively with the Warren County government to resolve outstanding legal and financial issues surrounding the EDA.

Prominent among those Town-County/EDA issues is what EDA officials have called “an undisputed” $8.8 million Town “moral obligation” debt on principal payments to the EDA on the police headquarters construction project. The balance on that debt as of June 1, is $8.4 million, EDA Director Parsons told Royal Examiner Wednesday.

EDA Board of Directors Chairman Ed Daley was present to watch Tuesday’s council action unfold. Asked for a reaction prior to having a chance to read the Reservation of Rights Agreement, Daley said, “Anything that moves it forward is positive.”

However, after a closer read, exactly how far forward Tuesday’s council action takes the Town-County-EDA discussion, remains a question.

$440,000 invoice – $10,500 (recoverable) payment

The opening paragraph of the Reservation of Rights Agreement notes that the Town had received a June 2 invoice “ostensibly setting out all costs incurred by the EDA in constructing and financing the construction of the Town of Front Royal Police Department (‘Costs’), including the costs and expenses associated with the loan from United Bank obtained to finance construction (‘Loan’)” and continues to note those costs and loan “are currently the subject of dispute” in the Town’s civil action against the EDA.

It is a civil action in which the Town’s contracted Damiani & Damiani law firm appears to have mirrored much of the language in the EDA’s initial civil litigation against Jennifer McDonald and 14 civil co-defendants and which seeks essentially all ($20 million-plus) of the $21.3 million the EDA alleges was misdirected by its former executive director and her first group of co-defendants. In April the EDA filed a second civil action, adding nine defendants and “not less than” $4.45 million in recoverable assets to its litigation.

But as to that June 2 invoice from the EDA, an invoice implying a request for payment on a debt, according to numbers in that invoice what the EDA presented to the Town was a bill for slightly over $441,300 spent thus far on the $8.8 million FRPD headquarters construction loan balance.

What the County and EDA got in response was the above-cited agreement facilitating a recoverable $10,529 payment that on a closer examination appears to try and legally tie the County and EDA’s hands in future court proceedings.

Legal ties that bind?

That agreement references ongoing “discussions” between the Town and County “which may result in amending the Town’s claims in the Litigation (against the EDA)”.

Contacted Wednesday, County Administrator Doug Stanley said county staff had not been involved in those discussions. Attempts to reach Board of Supervisors Chairman Walt Mabe, Vice-Chair Cheryl Cullers, and County Attorney Jason Ham for information on the referenced discussions and council proposal were unsuccessful prior to publication.

Reservation of Rights Agreement, Condition 1 states – “The Town denies that it owes any moral or legal obligation to repay the Loan”

So, referencing the “Reservation of Rights Agreement” passed 6-0 by council Monday, it states:

“WHEREAS, to facilitate the discussions, the County has asked the Town to make the disputed July 1, 2020, payment on the Loan and the Town has agreed, subject to the terms and conditions stated herein.” – As noted above, what was agreed to was a payment of $10,528.95, or half of the interest-only payment due for July, under the following conditions:

Condition 1 – “The Town denies that it owes any moral or legal obligation to repay the Loan” followed by Condition 2, noting that its payment is calculated on the unrealized New Market Tax Credit interest rate of 1.5%, rather than the actual 3% bank loan interest rate.

Condition 3 – “The County and the EDA acknowledge that this payment shall not be construed as, considered to be, or argued to be, in any forum, admission for any purpose, including but not limited to of liability of the Town for the Loan or the Costs.

Condition 4 – “The County and the EDA acknowledge that the Town’s payment is for a disputed debt, under a reservation of rights, and the Town reserves the right to continue to deny liability for the Loan or Costs and to recoup this payment should the discussions prove ultimately unsuccessful.

And drum roll, please, Condition 5 – “All parties agree that payment hereunder shall be inadmissible for any purpose except by the Town to recover this payment as damages in the Litigation.”

So, while Councilwoman Cockrell called the agreement a sign of good faith negotiations in the public interest by the Town, adding that news reports the Town is acting other than in good faith concerning the EDA as creating “a false narrative”, is she right?

Perhaps the EDA’s and County’s attorneys would be the best judge of that – hopefully prior to the signing of the “Reservation of Rights Agreement” by County and EDA officials. For at issue appears to be whose rights are being reserved, and in exactly what legal context regarding the Town’s civil litigation against the EDA and any related litigation over the Town’s responsibility to pay for its $9-million police station.

Because according to the document approved unanimously Tuesday night by the Front Royal Town Council, the Town has no “moral or legal” obligation to pay the EDA-undertaken $8.8-million loan that financed the construction of the Front Royal Police headquarters.

Is that something EDA and Warren County officials really want to sign off on in exchange for a one-time, recoverable, half monthly debt service payment?

Let’s see, a total of $20 million or more at stake versus a “recoverable” $10,500 payment – what do you think?

Ed Daley – File Photo.

We asked EDA Board Chairman Daley his opinion on Wednesday after he had a chance to review the Reservation of Rights documents more closely.

“The first the EDA heard of this was last night, which seems odd in that we are asked to sign off on it. But we’ll need to consult with our attorney first,” Daley reasoned.

Of the contention on a lack of Town liability to pay for its police station included in the document, Daley observed, “The EDA was happy to facilitate a project like that. But it was their (the Town’s) contract, their design, we just helped finance it. I think they need to get their financing together and pay for their police station.”

After we read the conditions in the agreement to her over the phone, EDA Attorney Sharon Pandak lauded the opportunity for further communications on Town-EDA/County issues but was skeptical as to a recommendation on the EDA signing off on the Reservation of Rights Agreement as worded.

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Food

4 tips for a successful Fourth of July barbecue

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

The Fourth of July is an ideal occasion to host a backyard barbecue. Here are four tips to ensure the day is a success.

1. Start planning early
Hosting a barbecue isn’t complicated, but waiting until the last minute to get organized can be stressful. A to-do list will ensure you don’t forget to pick up ice for the drink cooler or top up on fuel for the grill. If guests are bringing side dishes, preemptive planning can help you avoid ending up with four macaroni salads.

2. Get creative with colors

A simple way to incorporate patriotism into your decor is to use red and blue plates on a white tablecloth. Create simple centerpieces with mason jars, battery-powered headlights, and miniature American flags. For the rest of your yard, think flowers, balloons, and streamers. If you want to entertain the kids, buy some red, white and blue water balloons.

3. Keep the menu simple
Set out chips and dip for guests to snack on before you fire up the barbecue. Complement the traditional meat options with grilled asparagus, corn on the cob, or vegetable skewers. Remember, simple doesn’t have to mean boring. You can make the meal interactive with a build-your-own burger, nacho, or sundae bar.

4. Remember to relax
Independence Day is about spending time with loved ones and creating memories. Don’t hesitate to delegate tasks by assigning someone to the grill or asking guests to contribute a salad or dessert. Once everyone has a plate full of food, be sure to raise a glass to family and country.

Ideally, your barbecue should start in the early afternoon so you and your guests can make the most of a sunny day and still have time to go watch a fireworks display in the evening.

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Community Events

This week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of July 3rd

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

Are you looking for the full movie-going experience without having to wait in the long lines that often accompany that experience? Then look no further because Royal Cinemas movie theatre is the answer. Get the whole gang together and enjoy a movie! We are continuing to practice “6 Foot Social Distancing” with 25% capacity reserved seating in all auditoriums.

Outdoor Main Street Movie is this Friday, July 3, at 8:50pm:

  • Friday, July 3: “Ghostbusters”
  • Bring your own lawn chair and enjoy the outdoors! (Weather permitting)

Here is a list of this week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of Friday, July 3:

•  Daily: 3:55 & 6:35
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 56 min

•  Daily: 4:00 & 6:40
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 48 min

•  Daily: 4:05 & 6:45
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 47 min


COVID-19 Throwbacks Ticket Prices: All Seats $3.00


Other movies coming soon to Royal Cinemas:

  • “Goonies”
  • “Ferris Buellers Day Off”
  • “Gremlins”
  • “The Breakfast Club”
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Local News

Two days late! How July 4th became Independence Day

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

Few people realize that the resolution for American Independence was actually approved on July 2, 1776. Here’s how it happened.

By June of that year, the colonies were seething with revolt. The English Parliament had forced them to endure “an absolute tyranny,” as Thomas Jefferson later wrote in the Declaration of Independence.

Grievances included: Taxation without representation; Parliament’s dissolving the Virginia House of Burgesses; a monopoly on exports and imports resulting in exorbitant prices; and British troops being quartered in the colonists’ homes.

As the Continental Congress debated in Philadelphia, there were still those who pushed for reconciliation with the powerful mother country.

On June 7, 1776, Henry Lee of the Virginia Assembly laid a resolution before the Continental Congress for the colonies to be free and independent states. After a ferocious debate, both sides decided that a declaration of independence should be drafted in case it would be needed.

Of the five men named to write it, the job fell to Thomas Jefferson. At age 33, he felt Ben Franklin should do it, but Franklin was ill. Or that John Adams should, but Adams won him over by saying gruffly, “You can write ten times better than I.”

On July 1, Congress met to reconsider Virginia’s resolution for independence. At first, a third of the colonies voted against it, and the resolution was tabled until the following day. There followed a frenzy of activity.

Sent for by messenger, Caesar Rodney of Delaware arrived after an 80-mile ride on horseback, pelted by rain all the way. He broke a tie, and Delaware voted for independence.

Patriots converged on delegates of the remaining demurring states and won them over. The vote for independence was carried on July 2.

On July 3, Jefferson’s declaration was read and passages felt to be overly inflammatory were removed.

On July 4, the declaration was finally signed and approved. BUT … independence was actually voted on July 2, 1776.

John Adams, who later served as President, said in a letter, “The second day of July 1776 … will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.” He was almost right.

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Opinion

Continental Congress calls upon the Black Regiment

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

The debating was over, and the Declaration of Independence had been approved by the Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia on a hot July day. Questions abounded still and anxiety as to the future was on the minds of men who had now affixed their signatures to a piece of paper destined to be the greatest and most historic document in the history of the world.

At the bottom of the original Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress had ordered that when printed and ready for distribution on July 4th the documents would be sent to parish clergy and ministers. The importance of this is that the instructions did not direct this circulation to town clerks or newspapers, but to preachers of the Gospel, men known as the “Black Regiment” thus named for the black robes they wore.

The pulpit had already played and would play a more important role in American freedom. The black-robed ministers would encourage activism and many would personally join in the fighting and serve as soldiers and chaplains. As many as one hundred would leave the pulpit of the church for the “pulpit of the camp and battlefield.”

The Declaration when it arrived in the hands of the clergy was “required to read the same to their respective congregation, as soon as divine service ended, in the afternoon, on the first Lord’s Day after they have received it.”

Church members would find it hard to have services without their ministers now gone to war and with attendance dropping off for lack of clergy personnel on the home front. However, the war and home front would be the same… every place where the British chose to camp and sought to destroy George Washington’s “rag tag” army in the north and Nathanael Greene’s in the South.

Tempers flared in all corners of the land and debates were held between Loyalists and patriot members of congregations. In Loudoun County, Virginia, at Ketoctin Baptist Church, a debate between Tory John Osborn and Preacher John Marks was arranged. Heated tempers caused the debate to be called off and John Marks joined General Washington’s Army as a Chaplain. John Osborn would not give up his support of the King’s cause and in defiance would name a new son Tarleton after one of General Cornwallis’ most cruel officers, Colonel Banastre Tarleton. Tarleton is portrayed in Mel Gibson’s movie The Patriot as merciless and inhumane.

The Rev. Jonathan Boucher, Anglican Priest, would carry not just his sermon into the pulpit but also a loaded pistol. His congregation was split and the danger of personal attacks was ever present.

The Rev. Peter Muhlenberg of Woodstock, Virginia, preached regularly for the cause of freedom for the American colonists. He had a surprise for his congregation on the day of his final service in his Woodstock church to drive home his point that the American Revolution must succeed. Following the final hymn, he threw off his black robe as he recited Ecclesiastes 3:1 to reveal his uniform of a militia colonel. He then recruited men of his congregation to join the fight for independence and they became known as the “German Regiment.” He had been licensed as an Anglican priest and ministered to the German settlers of the Shenandoah Valley. He served with honor as a Revolutionary War officer and rose to the rank of major general. There is a statue of this black robed priest in the yard of the old courthouse in Woodstock honoring the Rev. Major General John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg, Priest, Patriot, Soldier and Hero.

The majority of Baptists, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Puritans, Methodists, and most of the denominations in the Colonies excepting the Quakers would join in preaching the insurrection. Anglican priests were split because of their vows of allegiance to the King but still many would heed the call of Independence. The torch of Independence was lit early with Anglican George Whitefield’s arrival in the Colonies in 1740. He was known as the greatest preacher in the Colonies. He preached salvation through Jesus Christ and gave warning to the people about the oppression of the King in his revivals and launched the “Great Awakening.” He traveled from New England to Georgia setting attendance records and started “field preaching” which Anglican John Wesley also used. The difference in the political points of view of Whitefield and Wesley were commonly known. Wesley taught “obedience” to the Crown and Whitefield spoke of “man’s right of freedom” from oppression, including the slaves.

We cannot avoid, ignore, or abandon our responsibilities in striving to preserve the heritage secured by our Founders. Laity and the clergy must be vigilant and ever ready to fight for our Republic to ensure it is not weakened by interlopers and left for scavengers who come to suckle from the breast of Liberty bought with the blood of patriots. We must speak out against the mocking of our form of government and the eschewing of our Constitution to satisfy alien purposes while abandoning individual freedoms we treasurer. Our Founders knew and voiced the reality that moral values of Christianity are the “bedrock” foundation of our Republic and it will crumble without them.

I invite all true Americans from the mountains to the plains, from sea to shining sea, from Alaska to the Keys, and from Virginia to Hawaii to light the fires of that “old time religion” and preserve the freedoms won on the frozen tundra of Valley Forge, in the icy Delaware River, on the dusty field at Guilford Courthouse, in the snake filled swamps of South Carolina, and finally, on the sandy beaches at Yorktown.

Arise if you heart is filled with concern for the future of our Country.

Larry Wilson Johnson
Front Royal, Virginia

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Obituaries

Richard (Dick) Engelhardt Bethune (1931-2020)

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When:
February 15, 2019 all-day
2019-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
2019-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Auto Care Clinic
6768 Winchester Road | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Auto Care Clinic
(540) 635-2455

Richard (Dick) Engelhardt Bethune

Richard (Dick) Engelhardt Bethune of Harrisonburg, Va., passed away on May 24, 2020, in Harrisonburg Va.

Dick was born in Albuquerque, N.M. to Lauchlin and Mildred Bethune on March 15, 1931. He grew up in Albuquerque and Clinton, N.C. He married Virginia Redhead Bethune on May 3, 1958, in Greensboro, N.C. He attended NC State University where he played football and ran track and graduated with a Textiles degree. He received a Master of Divinity degree from Union Seminary in Richmond, Va.

His Presbyterian pastorates were in Southside Virginia, Danville, Front Royal, and Pulaski. He also served as Parish Associate at Blacksburg United Methodist and Presbyterian Churches. He was a caring and faithful pastor and well-loved by the churches that he served. During his life, he was active in several communities and civic organizations, including Rotary International, Habitat for Humanity, and the Northwestern Community Services Board. He attended Trinity Presbyterian Church in Harrisonburg.

After retiring, Dick nurtured his talents of pastel portraiture, harp building, singing, model airplane building, golfing, and playing tennis. He also loved to surf fish when vacationing with his family at Topsail Beach, N.C. He was a loving, funny, and supportive husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, and friend.

Dick is preceded in death by his parents and his brother, Lauchlin Bethune.

Dick is survived by his wife, and light of his life, Virginia Bethune; children, Anna Collins (Mike) of Charlottesville, Va., Julie Boulais (Mike) of Winchester Va., and Mary Jordan of Capon Bridge, WVa.; brother, Jim Bethune of Wilmington, N.C.; grandchildren, Liza Collins (Tim) and Logan Collins (Jess) all of Charlottesville, Va., Jack Hilton of Fairfax, Va., Jacqueline Boulais of Austin, Texas, Rachel Boulais of Bryan, Texas and Clara Ludtke of Louisville, Ky.; great-grandchildren, Kaia Nelson and Jackson and Oliver Collins and many nieces and nephews.

Memorials may be made to Center for Natural Capital -“Rural American Resilience” PO Box 901, Orange, VA 22960, https://naturalcapital.us/

Arrangements will be postponed until gathering restrictions are eased and will be updated on the funeral home website.

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King Cartoons

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