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When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Answers to your gardening questions and problems! E-mail questions and pictures to greenhelpline.warrenco@gmail.com

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Local News

Record drop in cancer mortality for second straight year due to improved lung cancer treatment; COVID-19 impact still unknown

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on

When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Overall cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 through 2018 for a total decrease of 31%, including a 2.4% decline from 2017 to 2018. The news comes from the American Cancer Society’s annual Cancer Statistics, 2021 article, appearing in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and its consumer version, Cancer Facts & Figures 2021. This year marks the American Cancer Society’s 70th anniversary of reporting this data to inform the nation’s fight against cancer.

The report estimates that in the U.S. in 2021, almost 1.9 million (1,898,160) new cancer cases will be diagnosed and 608,570 Americans will die from cancer. These projections are based on currently available incidence and mortality data through 2017 and 2018, respectively, and thus do not account for the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses or deaths.

“The impact of COVID-19 on cancer diagnoses and outcomes at the population level will be unknown for several years because of the time necessary for data collection, compilation, quality control, and dissemination,” said Rebecca Siegel, MPH, lead author of the report. “We anticipate that disruptions in access to cancer care in 2020 will lead to downstream increases in advanced-stage diagnoses that may impede progress in reducing cancer mortality rates in the years to come.”

Progress in reducing mortality has slowed for other leading causes of death in the U.S. but accelerated for cancer, which is the second-leading cause. An estimated 3.2 million cancer deaths have been averted from 1991 through 2018 due to reductions in smoking, earlier detection, and improvements in treatment, which are reflected in long-term declines in mortality for the four leading cancers: lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate.

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death, accounting for more deaths than breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers combined. Sluggish progress against these latter cancers in recent years contrasts with accelerating reductions in the death rate for lung cancer, from 2.4% annually from 2009 to 2013 to 5% annually from 2014 to 2018. As a result, lung cancer accounted for almost half (46%) of the overall decline in cancer mortality in the past 5 years and spurred a record single-year drop (2.4% from 2017 to 2018) for the second year in a row.

Recent rapid reductions in lung cancer mortality reflect better treatment for the most common subtype – non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two-year relative survival for NSCLC has increased from 34% for patients diagnosed during 2009 through 2010 to 42% for those diagnosed during 2015 through 2016, including absolute gains of 5% to 6% for every stage of diagnosis. Two-year survival for small cell lung cancer remained at 14% to 15% during this time period.

Cervical cancer is almost 100% preventable through screening and, in recent years, the HPV vaccine, but continues to cause thousands of deaths in the U.S. annually. Approximately 11 women per day died from cervical cancer in 2018, half of whom were in their 50s or younger. It is the second-leading cause of cancer death among women in their 20s and 30s. Although the HPV vaccine holds promise to nearly eliminate cervical cancer with complete population coverage, U.S. vaccination rates remain far below those in other high-income countries: 57% of U.S. adolescent females are up-to-date vs >80% in Australia and >90% in the U.K. Per ACS guidelines HPV vaccinations are recommended in children starting between the ages of 9 to 12, and cervical cancer testing (screening) in young women should begin at age 25.

Other highlights from Cancer Statistics 2021/Cancer Facts & Figures 2021 include:

• Cancer is the leading cause of death in Hispanic, Asian American, and Alaska Native persons.

• The 5-year survival rate for all cancers combined diagnosed during 2010 through 2016 was 68% in White patients versus 63% in Black patients.

• For all stages combined, survival is the highest for prostate cancer (98%), melanoma of the skin (93%), and female breast cancer (90%), and lowest for cancers of the pancreas (10%), liver (20%), esophagus (20%), and lung (21%).

• Survival rates are lower for Black patients than for White patients for every cancer type except pancreas.

• Prostate, lung and bronchus, and colorectal cancers account for 46% of all incident cases in men, with prostate cancer alone accounting for 26% of diagnoses.

• For women, breast, lung, and colorectal cancers account for 50% of all new diagnoses, with breast cancer alone accounting for 30% of female cancers.

• In contrast to declining trends for lung and colorectal cancers, female breast cancer incidence rates increased by about 0.5% per year from 2008 to 2017, which is attributed at least in part to continued declines in the fertility rate and increased body weight.

• Colorectal cancer overtook leukemia in 2018 as the second leading cause of cancer death in men aged 20 to 39 years, reflecting increasing trends in colorectal cancer in this age group, coinciding with declining rates for leukemia.

• The Black-White disparity in overall cancer mortality among men and women combined has declined from a peak of 33% in 1993 (279 vs 211 per 100,000, respectively) to 13% in 2018 (174 vs 154).

• Geographic disparities are widest for the most preventable cancers, such as lung and cervical cancers, for which incidence and mortality rates vary up to 5- and 3-fold, respectively, across states.

“While recent advances in treatment for lung cancer and several other cancers are reason to celebrate, it is concerning to see the persistent racial, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities for highly preventable cancers,” said William G. Cance, M.D., chief medical and scientific officer, American Cancer Society. “There is a continued need for increased investment in equitable cancer control interventions and clinical research to create more advanced treatment options to help accelerate progress in the fight against cancer.”

Article: Siegel RL, Miller KD, Fuchs H, Jemal A. Cancer Statistics, 2021. CA: CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 2021. doi: 10.3322/caac.21654.
URL upon embargo: http://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21654

Note: Estimates should not be compared year-to-year. They are based on computer models of cancer trends and population and may vary considerably. Cancer trends should be based on age-adjusted cancer incidence and death rates (expressed as the number of cancer deaths per 100,000 people).

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Community Events

‘Dolly & Me’ Tea Party hosted by the Front Royal Church of Christ

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When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

On January 9th, the Front Royal Church of Christ held a tea party for six little girls. Jane McCool and Tenia Smith hosted the event, and the girls shared it with their doll babies and special stuffed animals.

The menu included finger sandwiches of ham and cheese with baby spinach leaves, fruit trays, cheese and tomatoes, scones, and mini cupcakes.

The girls made their own Facilitators (Hats) for the tea party. A game was also led by Tenia, called “Freeze”, which included their baby dolls and stuffed animals. Songs were sung with merry hearts from little girls’ voices. And lastly, tea party favors of white gloves and jewelry were given as keepsakes to remember their ‘Dolly & Me’ Tea Party.

Please enjoy some photographs from the special event:

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Automotive

Winter safety tips: coats and car seats

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When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Did you know that wearing a puffy coat or snowsuit while sitting in a car seat can put your child in danger? Here’s what you should know about keeping little ones safe and warm in the car this winter.

The risks
A thick winter coat gives the illusion that a car seat’s straps are snug and that your baby is securely fastened. However, that bulky material will compress upon impact in a crash and create a gap between the harness and the child’s body. This space is large enough that your baby can easily slip through the straps or be thrown from the seat entirely.

How to test the seat

Place your child in the car seat while they’re wearing the coat, and tighten the harness until it’s snug. (You shouldn’t be able to pinch the strap at their shoulder). Next, unfasten the straps without loosening them, remove the coat and place your child back in the seat. If the straps need to be tightened more, it means the coat is too bulky.

Safe alternatives
To keep your child warm in the car without compromising their safety, dress them in fitted layers such as a thermal knit sweater and fleece jacket. Once your child is fastened in the car seat, you can cover them with blankets or their coat. Just be sure to leave their face uncovered.

For a baby, you can use a car seat cover, but only if it doesn’t have a layer that goes underneath the infant.

To find everything you need to keep your child safe and warm in the car, visit the stores in your area.

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Interesting Things to Know

Ice fishing: tips for a successful day

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When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Ice fishing is a great way to relieve stress, reconnect with nature, and enjoy your own company or that of your fishing buddies. Whether you’re ready to go or still waiting for the ice to thicken, here are a few tips that will help guarantee you have a good experience.

Check the regulations
Before you head out, make sure you have the necessary permits and that you’re allowed to fish in the intended area. You also need to be familiar with the catch and possession limits for various species. Having this information will allow you to avoid unpleasant surprises and ensure that your activities are legal.

Check the conditions

Take into consideration the weather and ice conditions before you decide if you’ll be fishing in a shack or simply out on the ice. Mother Nature can be unpredictable, and without the right gear, you may have to turn back before you make your first catch.

Check your equipment
Many parks and lodges offer all-inclusive ice fishing packages. In this case, all you need to bring are your warm clothes and plenty of enthusiasm. However, if you have your own equipment, you’ll want to assess its condition before you head out. Visit hunting and fishing shops in your area if any of your gear is damaged or needs to be replaced.

Following these tips will ensure that once you drill your holes, you’ll be able to relax, unwind, and fully enjoy the ice fishing experience.

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Health

Leg pain could be a wake-up call for your cardiovascular health

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on

When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Everyone gets a charley horse now and again while walking. But what if you experience a painful cramping sensation more often than normal, or even every time you walk? Claudication – the medical term for leg pain while walking – is a common symptom of peripheral artery disease (PAD), an often undetected and sometimes dangerous condition, according to the Harvard Heart Letter.

PAD occurs when fatty deposits narrow and clog arteries outside the heart, most often in the legs. While some people have mild or no symptoms, cramping in the arms or legs that starts during physical activity and disappears after a few minutes of rest occurs in some PAD patients, according to the Mayo Clinic. Pain may also occur in the buttock, hip, thigh, or calf, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Other symptoms of peripheral artery disease include:

-Muscle weakness

-Hair loss
-Smooth, shiny skin
-Skin that is cool to the touch, especially if it occurs with pain while walking that subsides after stopping
-Decreased or absent pulses in the feet
-Persistent sores in the legs or feet
-Cold or numb toes

Peripheral artery disease is often a sign of fatty deposits in other areas of the body, which can reduce blood flow to the heart and brain, according to the Mayo Clinic. Contact your physician if you are experiencing these symptoms and over age 65; over age 50 and have a history of diabetes or smoking; or under age 50, but have diabetes and other risk factors like obesity or high blood pressure.

According to the CDC, a doctor may use a variety of tests and imaging techniques to diagnose this issue. Treatment may include aspirin or other antiplatelet medications, as well as lifestyle changes like tobacco cessation and exercise. In some cases, surgery may be necessary.

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Local News

Governor Northam COVID-19 update briefing – January 14, 2021

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When:
October 19, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-10-19T10:00:00-04:00
2020-10-19T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Governor Northam joins the Virginia Emergency Support Team to share the latest updates on the COVID-19 response.

Highlights include:

  • vaccine distribution to 160 sites
  • receiving 110,000 vaccine doses per week
  • the goal is to distribute 25,000 does per day
  • your turn will come, be patient
  • important to reopen our schools
  • possibility of year-round school
  • addressed threats of violence leading up to next week’s inauguration

Briefing begins about 8 minutes into the broadcast.

Governor Northam delivers State of the Commonwealth Address

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The Northwestern Prevention Collaborative and the Prevention Department at Northwestern Community Services Board, in conjunction with community service board prevention departments from across Virginia, will offer a free virtual training on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)[...]
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Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education @ Online Event
Save a Life: Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education January 29th The Northwestern Prevention Collaborative and Northwestern Community Services Board will offer a free virtual REVIVE! Training on January 29th from 12:30 pm to[...]