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Author Jeff Hunt book signing

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on

When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982

Author Jeff Hunt will be presenting and signing copies of his books from the Meade and Lee Series at multiple events in the state of Virginia.

  • The first event is at 7:00 pm on Wednesday, October 16th at the Warren Rifles Confederate Museum (95 Chester Street, Front Royal, VA). For more information visit: www.vaudc.org/museum
  • The second event will also begin at 7:00 pm on Thursday, October 17th at the Old Manassas Courthouse (9248 Lee Street, Manassas, VA). For more information visit: www.pwcgov.org/government
  • Jeff’s final stand-a-lone event will be at 12:00 pm on Friday, October 18th at the American Civil War Museum (500 Tredegar Street, Richmond, VA). Information for that event can be found at: www.acwm.org
  • Jeff will also be participating in the Pamplin Civil War Symposium in Petersburg, VA from October 18th through the 20th. More information on that event can be found at: http://www.pamplinpark.org

The Civil War in the Eastern Theater during the late summer and fall of 1863 was anything but inconsequential. Generals Meade and Lee continued where they had left off, executing daring marches while boldly maneuvering the chess pieces of war in an effort to gain decisive strategic and tactical advantage. Cavalry actions crisscrossed the rolling landscape; bloody battle revealed to both sides the command deficiencies left in the wake of Gettysburg. It was the first and only time in the war Meade exercised control of the Army of the Potomac on his own terms. Jeffrey Wm Hunt brilliant dissects these and others issues in Meade and Lee at Bristoe Station: The Problems of Command and Strategy After Gettysburg, from Brandy Station to the Buckland Races, August 1 to October 31, 1863.

The carnage of Gettysburg left both armies in varying states of command chaos as the focus of the war shifted west. Lee further depleted his ranks by dispatching James Longstreet (his best corps commander) and most of his First Corps via rail to reinforce Bragg’s Army of Tennessee. The Union defeat that followed at Chickamauga, in turn, forced Meade to follow suit with the XI and XII Corps. Despite these reductions, the aggressive Lee assumed the strategic offensive against his more careful Northern opponent, who was also busy waging a rearguard action against the politicians in Washington.

Meade and Lee at Bristoe Station is a fast-paced, dynamic account of how the Army of Northern Virginia carried the war above the Rappahannock once more in an effort to retrieve the laurels lost in Pennsylvania. When the opportunity beckoned Lee took it, knocking Meade back on his heels with a threat to his army as serious as the one Pope had endured a year earlier. As Lee quickly learned again, A. P. Hill was no Stonewall Jackson, and with Longstreet away Lee’s cudgel was no longer as mighty as he wished. The high tide of the campaign ebbed at Bristoe Station with a signal Confederate defeat. The next move was now up to Meade.

Hunt’s follow-up volume to his well-received Meade and Lee After Gettysburg is grounded upon official reports, regimental histories, letters, newspapers, and other archival sources. Together, they provide a day-by-day account of the fascinating high-stakes affair during this three-month period. Coupled with original maps and outstanding photographs, this new study offers a significant contribution to Civil War literature.

About the Author: Jeffrey William Hunt is Director of the Texas Military Forces Museum, the official museum of the Texas National Guard, located at Camp Mabry in Austin, Texas, and an Adjunct Professor of History at Austin Community College, where he has taught since 1988. Prior to taking the post at the Texas Military Forces Museum, he was the Curator of Collections and Director of the Living History Program at the Admiral Nimitz National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg, Texas for 11 years. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Government and a Masters Degree in History, both from the University of Texas at Austin. In 2013, Mr. Hunt was appointed an honorary Admiral in the Texas Navy by Governor Rick Perry, in recognition of his efforts to tell the story of the Texas naval forces at the Texas Military Forces Museum.

At both the Texas Military Forces Museum and the Admiral Nimitz Museum he has organized and conducted hundreds of living history programs for the general public. He is a veteran reenactor of the War Between the States as well as the War of 1812, the Texas Revolution, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War. He is a frequent speaker for a wide variety of organizations as well as documentaries and news programs.

Mr. Hunt’s writing credits include his book, The Last Battle of the Civil War: Palmetto Ranch, and contributions to Essential Civil War Curriculum, the Revised Handbook of Texas and the Gale Library of Daily Life: American Civil War.

About Savas Beatie LLC: Savas Beatie LLC is a leading military and general history publishing company. Read more about Meade and Lee After Gettysburg and Meade and Lee at Bristoe Station.

Real Estate

Understanding guaranteed sale programs

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on

When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982

Have you heard of realtors offering to buy your home if they don’t sell it within a certain length of time? While guaranteed sale programs may seem like a hassle-free way of selling your home, there are a few things you should know about them first.

You need to do your homework
No two programs of this type are the same. Different realtors offer different terms, and you need to look closely at the fine print. Find out what the limiting conditions are and ask for a detailed explanation of the offer and a written agreement that clearly outlines the costs involved.

You need to ask questions
Ask the realtor about their strategy for selling your home and how much you’ll get if they end up purchasing it. Many guaranteed sale programs involve listing a house under its market value to ensure a quick sale.

You should also get a written disclosure outlining any factors affecting property value and the brokerage’s plans for the property.

They’re not for everyone
Outside of ensuring a quick sale, these programs don’t offer many advantages. Some realtors denounce guaranteed sale programs as mere marketing schemes, citing that they rely on listing homes under market value and that anyone could sell a house for cheap.

In any case, make sure to look up potential realtors through the relevant professional real estate association and be careful before signing anything.

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The Cracked Acorn

The Cracked Acorn: Three Crosses

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When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982


Last Monday, I traveled to one of the remaining Cross Clusters south of Culpeper. Someone has parked a junked car on one side and they need a coat of paint.

On October 6, 1993, Bernard Coffindaffer died; he was 68. This was the end of an ambitious project that came out of “a genuine, marvelous, glorious vision” to plant crosses throughout the world.

He obediently spent 2 million dollars in the last years of his life putting these clusters in 29 states, District of Columbia, Zambia, and The Philippines. There are at least 1,864 and may be more since he listed their locations on small pieces of paper.

The Cross Clusters represent the two thieves and Christ. Coffindaffer said that the crosses infer, “Not for saints or for sinners but for everyone that Jesus died for our sins and He’s coming again.”

These California Douglas Firs stand at 20 and 25 feet. The outside ones are angel blue and the center is Jerusalem gold. At the erection of each Cross Cluster, a service was held. He said unto the people and His disciples, “Whoever desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me.” (Mark 8:34) – was often quoted. Prayers for repentance and forgiveness of sins were offered. Coffindaffer once said, “The Crosses speak peace within as we struggle without.”

Mr. Coffindaffer was born in West Virginia and was left an orphan at an early age. He graduated from high school at fourteen and spent six years in the Marine Corps in the Pacific theater and was at Iwo Jima and Nagasaki, Japan. He graduated with a business degree from the University of Charleston. He massed a fortune in the oil and coal businesses. At the age of forty-two, he declared himself a minister and served seven small churches in West Virginia. The Cross Clusters have been the subject of a documentary “Point Man for God” and part of a public television series “Different Drummer.”

In the past, I have taken several pictures and thought what would it be like to be crucified and lifted up in plain view for anyone to see. Like all plans of “mice and men” the crosses are being lost now in the hustle and bustle of our world. This cluster is fighting to stay visible among commercial motel and restaurant signs. I saw how hard it must be to appreciate it at 55 mph. You can easily miss this one set in a low valley.

The center cross is gold while the outside ones are white. All three are peeling. Christ’s cross is wrapped in strings of small lights that may have been on during the Christmas seasons. If you mention crosses today to someone they will talk of the recently made roadside memorials where fatal accidents have occurred. The original statement of the Clusters was to remind travelers to never forget the OLD RUGGED CROSS. The problems of our society have made an attempt to “fog over” the Crosses, but if you know where to look there’s still hope and the ONE who hangs there still loves you and really cares. It will always be the first thing you will see when the dew and fog have gone away for a new day.

“I left the throne of glory and counted it but loss, My hands were nailed in anger upon a cruel cross, But now we’ll make the journey with your hand safe in mine, So lift your cross and follow close to me.” (from Songs FAITH and Praise)

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Local News

Meet Blake Pierpoint, Owner of Blake & Company in Front Royal

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When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982

On November 6, the Warren County High School DECA Chapter conducted a “Job Shadowing Day” with local businesses in Front Royal. Twenty-six students shadowed owners, managers, and employees in twelve locally owned businesses. During this week, “Global Entrepreneurship Week”, we will spotlighting some of our successful local business entrepreneurs.

Businesses participating in this job shadowing activity included:

  • Blake & Co.
  • C & C Frozen Treats
  • Down Home Comfort Bakery
  • Jack Evans Chevrolet
  • Main Street Daily Grind
  • National Media Services
  • Ramsey Hardware
  • Royal Auto Works
  • Royal Comfort Shoe Center
  • Truss’D
  • United Bank
  • White Pickett Fence

Blake Pierpoint, owner of Blake & Co., welcomed two WCHS DECA students recently during Job Shadowing Day on November 6.

Blake Pierpoint, the owner of Blake and Company, provides a multitude of hair services, spa services, and makeup sessions out of her shop at 1201 N Shenandoah Avenue, Front Royal, VA 22630. She decided to open her own business, primarily in hair, because it’s her passion, and she wanted to create a business that she could make her own. Blake chartered her own business as soon as she possibly could in 2008 when she found her dream venue; Blake admired the open space and elegant windows, which both add to the upscale ambiance. She says her mission at the outset for her business was to make sure her business was unique. What makes her business so unique is the ambiance, friendliness of her staff, and the high standards she holds for her business.

Blake attributes her success to her husband, because he’s been a big supporter throughout the whole process of creating her business. When asked what she would recommend to someone who’s starting out their own business, she says that they should make sure they have professional help from an attorney and an accountant from the start. Blake also suggests to make sure you have a business plan established from the start. If you’re interested in Blake and Company’s services, call 540-635-4033, or visit their shop Tuesday through Friday from 9am-7pm, or Saturday from 9am-5pm.

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Opinion

Historical Forgiveness

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When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982

For me, Heaven will not be Heaven unless there is a history symposium at least once a week. For this week’s symposium they are going to have to set out extra chairs to handle the larger than normal crowds, for I am sure the special guest will be Dr. James I “Bud” Robertson. Dr. Robertson died November 2 at 89-years-old. Simply put, in my humble opinion, Dr. Robertson is the greatest Civil War scholar and teacher ever. Some of his teachings have fallen out of favor today, but I believe what he stood for and taught are as important today as they ever were. I did not plan on discussing the Civil War in this column, but with the passing of this giant in the historical world, I want to dedicate this week to him.

Dr. Robertson will be remembered in history for his academic accomplishments. He was a gifted and accomplished author who wrote more than 18 books. His greatest achievement is the biography of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, making him the leading authority on the general. He was asked by President John F. Kennedy to serve as executive director of the United States Civil War Centennial Commission. Dr. Robertson was in a difficult position of having to celebrate the War in the midst of the growing Civil Rights movement. He was at the forefront of the controversial position of having to bridge the gap between recognizing the positives in southern generals while understanding the controversy surrounding the Confederacy.

For me, and the thousands of students who were fortunate enough to take his classes, he will always be remembered as a gifted storyteller. It was my pleasure to serve as his graduate assistant for two years (2000-2002), where I learned from him every day. Part of my responsibilities was to attend all his classes. He had the ability of making history come alive. On more than one occasion I noticed students teary-eyed as they left the auditorium. Especially when he spoke of Jackson’s death, it was hard to find a dry eye in the room. Think about that, how many teachers can bring that kind of emotion. It was like he lost a friend. Students left inspired when he talked about patriotism and duty, grossed out when he talked about diseases and hospitals, and saddened when he spoke of sacrifice.

As a proud son of the South, he resented the current attitude of tearing down our history. He has been seen as a dying breed of historians that still believed Lee and Jackson deserved honor. As part of this column, I want to share his thoughts on the topic. Our last conversation was on this subject. I had been having internal struggles towards removing statues of southern generals. I do understand why some want them removed. The South did stand for slavery and oppression, but I cannot help also feel that it is wrong on some level. These were flawed men for sure, but having studied under men, like Bud Robertson, taught me there was also good. I want to share a part of his last email to me.

Do not apologize for your feelings. You are morally and historically correct.

One cannot look at the past through the lenses of the present. When war clouds gathered in 1860, the so-called United States was 70 years old—too young to have wisdom or experience. In 1860 the Lee family had been living in Virginia for 225 years. When Lee mentioned his “birthright” and “his country,” he was referring to Virginia. The so-called “political correctness” crowd does not have an understanding of this. Lee opposed slavery and considered secession to be revolution, yet he had a consuming sense of duty to come to his country’s defense.

Had Virginia remained in the Union, Lee would have fought just as hard for the Union as he did for Confederacy. One has only to read the story of Lee’s last five years, when he became the greatest spokesman for reconciliation America has ever had, to see the real greatness of the man.

History is the greatest teacher we will ever have, it is tragic that 75% of the American people cannot pass a basic history qualification exam. Winston Churchill’s words are so relevant: “When the present starts arguing with the past, we are going to lose the future.

My best to the family.

James Robertson”

In honor of Dr. Robertson, I want to make a suggestion. I propose we start a national dialogue of forgiveness. I am afraid that too many who speak on reconciliation are just trying to blame.  Figuring out who is to blame will never solve any of our issues with race or remembrance. Placing blame only fires up our passions, even if you know your side is in the wrong on some issues. Forgiveness is not about forgetting. It is learning from our mistakes, remembering them, and changing for the better. With forgiveness, White Southerners can embrace the good parts of their heritage while they stand beside and ask forgiveness from Black Americans. If forgiveness is truly asked for and truly accepted, we can all learn from our past and be able to stand hand-in-hand in partnership towards the future.

We are becoming a divided nation, not quite to the level that caused the Civil War, but yet it is that very War that is causing us to remain divided. Maybe if we can find a way to stop attacking and start forgiving we can save this nation, fix what divides us, maybe fulfill the wish of the Civil War president who gave his life for the cause of unity: “It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

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Community Events

How could one woman steal $53 million without anyone noticing?

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When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982

How could one woman steal $53 million without anyone noticing? As city comptroller of Dixon, IL, Rita Crundwell stole $53 million of public funds across 20 years–making her the perpetrator of the largest case of municipal fraud in American history. She used the funds to build one of the nation’s leading quarter horse breeding empires, all while forcing staff cuts, police budget slashing, and neglect of public infrastructure. ALL THE QUEEN’S HORSES investigates her crime, her lavish lifestyle and the small town she left in her wake.

On November 24th at 2pm, at the Warren County Community Center, the Warren County Coalition will be showing the documentary ALL THE QUEEN’S HORSES, where you’ll also meet the author of this movie, Kelly Richmond Pope. This is a free event and open to the public. See the Warren County Coalition Facebook page for more information.

Kelly Richmond Pope is an Associate Professor in the School of Accountancy and MIS at DePaul University in Chicago, IL, and founder of Helios Digital Learning, Inc. She received her doctorate in accounting from Virginia Tech and she is a licensed certified public accountant. She worked in the forensic practice at KPMG, LLP on anti-money laundering engagements, insurance fraud investigations, and fraud risk management projects. Kelly is a recognized expert in the forensic accounting field and has conducted forensic accounting seminars around the world for universities, corporations and governmental entities.

Kelly is the creator and executive producer of the award winning educational white-collar crime documentary, Crossing the Line: Ordinary People Committing Extraordinary Crime. Her current documentary, All the Queen’s Horses, which chronicles the largest municipal fraud in U.S. history, will be released August 2017. She was selected by the TED Ed team to develop a teaching lesson on “How People Rationalize Fraud” which can be found on the TED Ed website. Her TEDx talk “Why We Hate Whistle-blowers” discusses the whistle-blower dilemma and the need for whistle-blowers in fraud discovery.

Watch the trailer:

All the Queen’s Horses from Gravitas Ventures on Vimeo.

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Interesting Things You Need to Know

3 reasons to visit a barber

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When:
October 16, 2019 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2019-10-16T19:00:00-04:00
2019-10-16T20:30:00-04:00
Where:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
95 Chester St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren Rifles Confederate Museum
(540) 636-6982

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to sit in a barber’s chair and get an old-fashioned hair cut? Here are three good reasons to give it a try.

1. Superior style
A good barber is a true expert and will make sure to trim your hair and beard so that the style suits your build and features perfectly. By going to a pro, you’ll avoid razor burn, nicks and uneven cuts.

2. Professional advice
Visiting a barber also means getting professional advice. Whatever style you opt for, they’ll be able to tell you how you should brush, moisturize and maintain your hair. If you’re trying to fix a patchy beard, your barber can give you some tips to stimulate growth or better style your facial hair.

3. A range of services
Don’t underestimate the importance of an eyebrow trim. It can structure your features and complete your look. Some barber shops also offer skin care, massages and other services.

Finally, remember that barber shops often sell specialized, hard-to-find products to help you maintain your hair and beard. Don’t hesitate to ask them if they have the product you’re looking for.

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King Cartoons

‘Tis the Season

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Front Royal
44°
Mostly Cloudy
07:0016:56 EST
Feels like: 43°F
Wind: 3mph S
Humidity: 89%
Pressure: 29.84"Hg
UV index: 2
TueWedThu
52/37°F
51/31°F
55/44°F

Quotes

Upcoming Events

Nov
19
Tue
1:30 pm Botanical Drawing II: Drawing in... @ Art in the Valley
Botanical Drawing II: Drawing in... @ Art in the Valley
Nov 19 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Botanical Drawing II: Drawing in Color @ Art in the Valley
Learn and practice the art of botanical drawing in colored pencil with local artist and instructor Elena Maza. This four week course will focus on continuing to build drawing skills as applied to botanicals: students[...]
4:30 pm Science Scouts and More @ Samuels Public Library
Science Scouts and More @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 19 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Science Scouts and More @ Samuels Public Library
Tuesday, November 5: Kids will explore popular books and book series through science, games, food, and more! Based on the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, we will do some taffy pulling and have a[...]
Nov
20
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 20 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, November 6 and Thursday, November 7: It’s playtime! Come in for stories, songs, and a craft about our favorite toys, games, and imaginings! Siblings welcome.[...]
1:30 pm Botanicals in Watercolor I @ Art in the Valley
Botanicals in Watercolor I @ Art in the Valley
Nov 20 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Botanicals in Watercolor I @ Art in the Valley
This four week course with instructor, Elena Maza, will deal with the basic three-primary color palette, different pigments and how they interact, how to mix all colors from three primary colors, how to apply washes,[...]
7:00 pm Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Nov 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Drama Performance: "Loserville" @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
On Wednesday, November 20th, and Thursday, November 21st, Randolph-Macon Academy’s Performing Arts Department will present its 2019 fall production of Elliot Davis’ and James Bourne’s musical, Loserville. The musical, which will take place in Melton[...]
Nov
21
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 21 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, November 6 and Thursday, November 7: It’s playtime! Come in for stories, songs, and a craft about our favorite toys, games, and imaginings! Siblings welcome.[...]
7:00 pm Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Nov 21 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Drama Performance: "Loserville" @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
On Wednesday, November 20th, and Thursday, November 21st, Randolph-Macon Academy’s Performing Arts Department will present its 2019 fall production of Elliot Davis’ and James Bourne’s musical, Loserville. The musical, which will take place in Melton[...]
Nov
22
Fri
9:00 am Veteran Services Visit @ Able Forces Professional Services
Veteran Services Visit @ Able Forces Professional Services
Nov 22 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Veteran Services Visit @ Able Forces Professional Services
Able Forces will once again be hosting a visit by Andre Miller, Resource Specialist, Virginia Veteran and Family Support, Department of Veteran Services, Commonwealth of Virginia this Friday 22 November from 9AM to Noon. As[...]
Nov
23
Sat
10:30 am Children’s Class: Drawing A Self... @ Art in the Valley
Children’s Class: Drawing A Self... @ Art in the Valley
Nov 23 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Children's Class: Drawing A Self Portrait @ Art in the Valley
In this class students will learn how to draw facial features and the proportions used for placement of features on a face.  They will complete a self portrait using graphite. Classes are designed for the[...]
2:30 pm The Princess & the “P___” @ Samuels Public Library
The Princess & the “P___” @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 23 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
The Princess & the “P___” @ Samuels Public Library
Lyla sees no purpose to princes. They’re ugly, stupid—and obnoxious! Why can’t Hagabah see that, and why must the master insist that she keep the prince around three more days? The world would be a[...]