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Build a Whimsical Clay House

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When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

In this clay workshop you will make a whimsical house, using several decorating techniques to achieve textures, that you can later highlight with color. Perfect for beginners and potters alike.

Choose to make it a bird house, fairy house or even a luminary.

Interesting Things to Know

Job hunting: 3 ways to make employers take notice

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When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

If you want to land a job in a competitive field, you’ll need to make an effort to stand out from the crowd. Here are three ways to set yourself apart and make employers take notice.

1. Cultivate industry connections
In addition to compiling a list of references from previous employers, you should build relationships with other professionals in your field. Attend networking events and participate in training workshops to gain recognition. This will increase your chances of getting a referral and hearing about new positions. Plus, you’re more likely to be considered for an interview if the recruiter recognizes your name.

2. Create an online portfolio

If you’re an expert in a particular area of your field, consider publishing regular blog posts that showcase your knowledge. Additionally, you can share and comment on articles about the industry through social media. This allows you to develop an online reputation and ensures that if a potential employer searches your name, they’ll find plenty of evidence to validate your qualifications.

3. Make the most of interviews
Keep in mind that when you’re up against a strong field of competitors, small details can often make the difference in an interview. While you should be thoroughly prepared to discuss your experience and qualifications, you should also ensure your attire, facial expressions, tone, and posture demonstrate confidence and professionalism.

Finally, rather than submit a generic cover letter and CV, take the time to tailor each application to suit the position. Highlight your most pertinent experience and explain why you would be a good fit for that particular company.

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Health

Minor mishaps get your attention?

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When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

What’s been happening to you of late?

If you’ve been having close encounters of the accidental kind, it’s time to give some personal attention to the causes.

While many ordinary people seldom suffer a mishap, others seem to trip over things, cut their fingers, barely miss a pedestrian on the road, or get hit by something falling off a shelf.

According to the Center for Injury Research and Policy, there is no such thing as an accident-prone personality. It can’t be blamed on genetics.

Doctors at the Center, a part of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, say reasons can be found for minor mishaps and near-miss accidents.

When a rash of unfortunate incidents begins, they say, it’s up to the individual to uncover the causes.

They suggest that you note each time you have an accident and see if you can identify a common theme. For instance, maybe you are more likely to trip when you are rushing to get to an appointment. Or perhaps minor mishaps could be more likely to occur on days when you have not had enough sleep. Or you could be more likely to suffer a near-miss when you and your mate are on the outs.

You could find, as one subject did, that some trouble is rooted in your work environment and in circumstances you can control.

As an example of a small job-related injury, one person related the story of how she was cut near her eye. A file folder was stuck in the drawer and struck her when it finally gave in to her pulling.

The cure for this one is obvious: Reorganize file drawers, so they aren’t so crowded.

Wisdom dictates that each near-miss be examined.

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Local News

WCPS starts new school year staring down COVID-19 related challenges

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When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic did not prevent Warren County Public Schools (WCPS) from starting off the 2020-2021 academic year, although some issues did crop up during the first week, according to WCPS Superintendent Chris Ballenger.

“It was a good start; we did have some challenges,” Ballenger told Warren County School Board members during their Wednesday, September 16 meeting. “But we had a good start considering the situation that we’re in with this pandemic.”

On day one at the elementary schools, for instance, Ballenger said there were some long lines getting parents through, as well as a few backups and traffic congestion on some roads. But he explained that such issues were simply due to it being the first day of school, and “of getting everybody in and being able to make sure we got them to where they were going, and getting the buses in, and getting the buses sanitized so that they could go do their next run.”

“But when you entered the buildings and you saw the interactions of the teachers and the students… you could see the students smiling underneath their masks,” said Ballenger. “It was nice to see the students there, and they wanted to be there.”

For virtual learners, technology challenges took precedent on their first day, the superintendent said, but the WCPS Technology Department worked quickly to rectify the issues, which were partly due to en masse sign-ons to the school division’s network — basically an online traffic jam of sorts.

Ballenger said that during the first week of school, WCPS corrected, made changes, and streamlined processes to solve the challenges. “Schools are getting that cycle going, so, we’re moving in some positive directions,” he said. “We still have some issues, but we will continue to address those.”

WCPS Technology Director Timothy Grant — who received a round of applause from Ballenger, the School Board, and WCPS Central Office staff for the work he and his team have accomplished to get the school year going — reported that more than 2,200 Chromebooks and tablets are expected to arrive “any day now,” and once delivered, they will be configured and deployed as soon as possible to the schools for student use.

All WCPS virtual learners have received their laptops and tablets, Grant said, adding that new parts have just come in “so we’re repairing all the Chromebooks that had some problems.”

At the same time, the WCPS Technology Help Desk has been very busy. “I can’t tell you how many calls we get, but it’s busy. It’s ringing all the time,” said Grant. “All [6] of our techs are on the help desk until it settles down.”

Technology staff also have deployed 60 hot spots around Warren County, with most of them being used in the Browntown and Bentonville areas. Grant said WCPS still has 30 more hot spots to configure that will provide teachers and students with free internet access for virtual learning.

Grant also said the tech staff is working diligently “to stay ahead of the curve” on security, and thus far has not experienced any breaches on the WCPS network and will continue to regularly monitor the network.

“I know you’ve worked a lot of hours and I think I can speak for the board — we all greatly appreciate the effort that you and your team put in to keep everybody up and running, so thank you very much,” said School Board Chairman Arnold Williams, Jr.

WCPS Assistant Superintendent Melody Sheppard updated School Board members on how WCPS transportation, food services, and custodial services fared during the first week of school.

Along with new bus runs, for example, WCPS transportation employees yesterday started delivering seven-days-worth of free school meals (breakfast and lunch) at its summer stops around the County. Some 850 students on Wednesday received meals, which will continue to be delivered through December 31 unless the program gets extended, Sheppard said.

“We’ll adjust if we need to,” she said. “We’re trying to make sure all of our students are eating.”

Additionally, more custodial employees are now working day-time hours to regularly wipe down high-touch surfaces throughout the school day, said Sheppard.

WCPS Special Services Director Michael Hirsch said that school health and wellness efforts have been followed diligently by WCPS staff and families, who have adhered to daily pre-screening and other health checklist items. “It’s been crucial for ensuring students are healthy before they enter school,” he said.

During the School Board’s work session portion of its meeting, Ballenger also provided a school enrollment update as it pertains to the WCPS budget, noting that the current population of 4,957 students is down by 60 students.

Once the school district contacts these 60 students, the population could increase to 5,017 students, which is still lower than what the current WCPS budget is based on of 5,202 students. This would reduce the district’s budget by $916,886, Ballenger reported.

“In this year’s budget, we have a contingency of around $531,366 so right now we are looking at what we need to do as far as financials,” he said. “We do have a lot of things on hold. We’re still trying to find those students.”

Currently, Ballenger also said that there are 89 students total who attended WCPS last year who now are under home instruction status, which removes them from WCPS rolls, also consequently impacting the budget. While some of these 89 students may physically return to school once the buildings open back up, “we don’t know when that may be,” said Ballenger.

At the same time, because WCPS now operates a hybrid-learning model consisting of in-person and virtual education, some numbers of students may be recovered at the high school and middle school levels once they work out scheduling, Ballenger said. “Principals and schools are calling and making contact with students that have not shown up yet to see where they are at,” the superintendent said.

To watch the entire School Board meeting, watch the Royal Examiner video.

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Town Talk: A conversation with Congressman Ben Cline

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When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

In this Town Talk, our publisher Mike McCool speaks with Congressman Ben Cline. Cline was in town for the Warren County Republican “Pig Roast” held at the VFW grounds in Front Royal. Topics in this Town Talk includes 2nd Amendment and Sanctuary Cities, Supreme Court appointment, supporting law enforcement, civil unrest, monument removals, elections, and COVID response.

Ben Cline represents Virginia’s 6th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he is a member of the House Judiciary Committee and the House Education and Labor Committee. He previously served as a Member of the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 24th District from 2002-2018. In the Virginia House, Cline chaired the Committee on Militia, Police, and Public Safety.

Prior to his election to the House of Representatives in 2018, Ben was an attorney in private practice. From 2007 until 2013, he served as an Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney for Rockingham County and the City of Harrisonburg.

Ben also worked for Congressman Bob Goodlatte, beginning as a member of his legislative staff in 1994 and ultimately serving as the Congressman’s Chief of Staff.

Ben grew up in Rockbridge County, Virginia, and is a 1990 graduate of Lexington High School. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Bates College and his law degree from the University of Richmond. Ben and his wife Elizabeth live in Botetourt County with their two daughters.


Town Talk is a series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders, and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea, topic, or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to news@RoyalExaminer.com

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Virginia House bill to guarantee free school meals to students advances to Senate

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When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

Del. Danica Roem, D-Prince William

The Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill this month to provide free school meals for 109,000 more public school students in the commonwealth.

House Bill 5113, introduced by Del. Danica Roem, D-Prince William, passed the chamber unanimously. Roem’s bill requires eligible public elementary and secondary schools to apply for the Community Eligibility Provision through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service.

“School food should be seen as an essential service that is free for everyone regardless of their income,” Roem said.

The program allows all students in an eligible school to receive free breakfast and lunch. Currently, 425 schools are eligible for CEP but don’t take part in the program, according to a document that details the financial impact of the legislation. More than 420 schools and 200,000 students participated in CEP during the 2018 to 2019 school year, according to the Virginia Department of Education.

The bill allows eligible schools to opt-out of the program if participating is not financially possible.

Most Virginia food banks have purchased twice as much food each month since the pandemic started when compared to last year, according to Eddie Oliver, executive director of the Federation of Virginia Food Banks.

“We’re just seeing a lot of need out there, and we know that school meal programs are really the front line of ensuring that kids in Virginia have the food they need to learn and thrive,” Oliver said.

Virginia school districts qualify for CEP if they have 40% or more enrolled students in a specified meal program, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). It also includes homeless, runaway, migrant, and foster children, Roem said.

Sandy Curwood, Director of the Virginia Department of Education Office of School Nutrition Programs, said school districts receive federal reimbursement based on a formula.

“Making sure that children have access to good healthy food, and particularly through school meals I think is a great opportunity,” Curwood said.

The federal government will reimburse schools that have more than 62.5% of students who qualify for free meals, Roem said. Schools with between 55% and 62.4% of students enrolled will receive between 80% and 99% reimbursement.

“If HB 5113 is the law, how their children will eat during the school day will be one less worry for students and their families,”, said Semora Ward, a community organizer for the Hampton Roads-based Virginia Black Leadership Organizing Collaborative. The meals are available whether children are physically in schools or attending virtual classes.

The Virginia Black Leadership Organizing Collaborative has raised $8,000 in the past three years for unpaid school meals in Hampton and Newport News, according to Ward.

“While we are pleased with these efforts and the outpouring of community support, we should have never had to do this in the first place,” she said.

Roem was one of several legislators that took on the USDA earlier this year to not require students to be present when receiving free school meals during the pandemic. The Virginia General Assembly passed Roem’s bill earlier this year that allows school districts to distribute excess food to students eligible for the School Breakfast Program or National School Lunch Program administered by the USDA.

HB 5113 has been referred to the Senate Education and Health Committee.

By Aliviah Jones

Capital News Service

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The Cracked Acorn

The Cracked Acorn: Timolo

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on

When:
July 27, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2019-07-27T10:00:00-04:00
2019-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Explore Art & Clay
100 East 8th St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Contact:
Explore Art & Clay
540-636-6019

For over 30 years the 2 antennas attached to the roof of my rambler served well to provide free TV service. It happened that 6 months ago, that suddenly ended ‘Why?” who knows, but it bugged me as to the cause.

Finally, I overcame the impulse not to climb onto the roof and explore why I no longer had free programming. So, I put up the ladder and tied it to one of the deck railings, and up I went. I discovered, ‘nothing’ for my effort. Something at the far end of the roof caught my eye and I cautiously went there to find out what it was, I almost made it when my foot caught the end of the ridge roof vent; I lost my balance and fell the 40 feet to the ground, all happened before you could say, “Jack Robinson.” I was out cold and it seemed that in a few winks, I recovered and raised up and felt good and decided to walk the 160 paces to the mailbox and check to see if I had a refund check(joke).

So, feeling ok I decided to walk about the neighborhood and enjoy the view. I saw people I knew and waved, they did not wave or notice me. I soldiered on about enjoying this beautiful day. Why was a fire truck, medical ambulance and police cars heading my way? I picked up the pace and was back home. Oh my, there were all these vehicles in my driveway and a number of neighbors were there in the mix, all surrounding and bending over something or a person on the ground at the far end of my house. All this puzzled me and no one saw me just standing there?
Whatever it was, must be awful to have all these souls here.

All this was quite disturbing me, but all the clanging and booming and chatter of noise woke me… Yes! I am in my bed and all the latter was due to eye drops that my doctor suggested…she never told me of the fine print that went with the prescription that Timolol interferes with the thinking of one’s brain. Why the 3 lbs of protoplasm I carry about and rely on should entertain the idea I wanted to plunge off my home’s roof is shelved for another day in the neural theather.

But for a few moments I lived the following:

21 And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea.

2 And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.

3 And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God.4 And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. (Revelation 21)

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
66°
Sunny
6:59am7:11pm EDT
Feels like: 66°F
Wind: 5mph NE
Humidity: 37%
Pressure: 30.44"Hg
UV index: 4
SunMonTue
min 37°F
64/37°F
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