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Design a chair for the SPCA CHAIR-ity Brunch

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on

When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

Calling all artists!! Design a chair for the SPCA CHAIR-ity Brunch and save homeless animals. Pick up a chair from the SPCA Thrift Shop, build a chair, up-cycle a chair, paint a chair, or upholster a chair. All types of chairs welcome. Chairs must be completed by August 22nd.

For more information, and to sign up to participate in the SPCA’s signature event, please contact Lavenda Denney at 540-662-8616 ext. 406 or director@winchesterspca.org.

Livestream

Skyline HS vs Brentsville HS: Girls basketball game livestreaming January 22, 2021 at 5:45pm

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on

When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

Skyline High School will be playing Brentsville High School Tuesday, January 12, 2021. JV/V Girls will be at home. JV will start at 6 PM, Varsity will begin at about 7:30 PM.

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Local News

‘Polar Plunge’ launches 2021 Humane Society programs as spay-neuter clinic fundraising progresses

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When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

Two major events, one to make money, the other to spend, were launched this month by the Humane Society of Warren County (HSWC) while a look in the rear-view mirror focused on a highly successful 2020 despite the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic.

Executive Director Meghan Bowers, beginning just her third year on the job, announced the date of the second annual Polar Plunge – February 20 – which already has five sponsors and 35 swimmers lined up for a wintertime dip in the frigid waters of Culpeper Lake at the 4-H Center, south of town. Bowers floated the first winter swim last year, an outstanding success financially and for swimmers and onlookers alike that raised more than $10,000.

Polar Plungers, circa 2020, head in for an invigorating dip as family and friends record the event for posterity. Courtesy Photos HSWC

“We’re setting a target of $12,000 this year,” Bowers said, while at the same time proclaiming a healthy start to a campaign to establish a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in downtown Front Royal. “This will have a huge impact on the lives of animals and their people in our community,” she said.

Within just a couple of weeks of a campaign to raise $125,000 as startup money for the clinic, $109,000 is already promised or in hand and interviewing of potential staff members begins next week. Inquiries about the proposed veterinary clinic have already been received by other rescue groups, Bowers said. Until now, spay/neuter candidates have been shipped to Harrisonburg twice a month in lots of about 80 animals per trip.

Looking back on the year of the pandemic, Bowers provided interesting information and impressive statistics including 678 adoptions of mostly dogs and cats, many new “foster families”, three pet food distributions serving 289 families, and the preservation of the title “no-kill” shelter with a 95.6% live release rate.

HSWC Executive Director Meghan Bowers gives a little hands-on seasonal attention to Wagner Shelter resident.

For most of the year, visits to the shelter were confined to “appointments only” due to the virus, but plenty of work for the staff which, Bowers said, was fully retained through the pandemic months of 2020.

Of the upcoming “Polar Plunge,” Bowers named the sponsors – City National Bank, Cool Techs Heating and Air, Ellen Aders State Farm, AirPac, MDUB Chauffer Services, and Cavalier Kennels. Aders is the president of HSWC. Of the 35 individuals already committed to the plunge – and seeking personal sponsorship money – there are 15 newcomers to the chilly sport including Bowers (look for the shark among the costumed entrants) and 20 returning plungers. Molly Llewellyn of Front Royal was the top money earner last year with exactly $1,000. So far, Bowers confided, she has $467 in sponsorship money.

Above, a shark awaits the plunge of a family of penguins – the potentially hazardous encounter ended well though, as predator and prey formed a Polar Plunge bond. Below, maybe it’s time to get back to dry land, some 2020 Polar Plungers decide, besides we’re not sure we can trust that shark.

The HSWC is a non-profit agency that houses homeless, neglected, abused and unwanted animals, in business since 1947. While primarily dealing with cats and dogs, the shelter has also been home to horses, other livestock, birds, reptiles and more.

For more information, visit https://hswcevents.org

These six Polar Plungers are all smiles under relatively balmy 2020 winter skies – will they be as lucky this year?

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Community Events

Volunteers turn Day of Service into an effort to cleanup part of Warren County

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When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

Rea with Eric and his sons are ready to fill some trash bags

Roadside trash includes fast food containers, plastic bags, lighters, butts, bottles, cans, and Styrofoam.

As part of this year’s National Day of Service, a group of folks from Warren County decided to clean up sections of Route 522 between Robin Lane and Gate 3 of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.  It was a perfect day for the cleanup, with temperatures above freezing and into the 40s, and little wind or precipitation.  One big advantage of doing a cleanup at this time of year is that you can go into the underbrush and not worry about encountering a snake, or dealing with ticks, spiders, etc.  In addition, with the leaves off the trees and bushes, it is easier to spot trash.

Most of the cleanup crew members met at Mountain Home B&B about 10am on January 18th, dressed for the weather and wearing good boots for tromping along the side of the road and into the brush.  Mountain Home provided trash bags and gloves, and offered a free Gatorade or Vitamin Water for each volunteer.  The B&B owners also assured participants that they would transport all the bags of trash to one of Warren County’s five refuse/recycle collection sites.  Several participants also helped with taking pictures to commemorate the event.

Steve shows what’s already in the bag

The road section that was cleaned up includes the Appalachian Trail road crossing and parking area, but that wasn’t where most of the trash was found.  Cigarette butts, glass and plastic bottles, beverage cans, Styrofoam cups and plastic lids and straws, were distributed fairly evenly across the entire stretch of roadway, indicating that some people in vehicles must be tossing these items out their windows as they drive along.  One brand of beer kept showing up again and again, leading us to wonder if one person was throwing a beer bottle out the window every day.  Other items collected appeared to be construction debris that was not carefully strapped down and then flew out of trucks as they began to accelerate.

Most of the trash bags headed to the refuse collection site

Rea and Lisa prep to pick up trash

Smokers may not realize that tossing their butts out the window or on the ground (unless it is on your own private property) is littering and is against the law.  The filters, made up of plasticized cellulose acetate, do not biodegrade and can last for many years.

Besides being gross, and littering being illegal, the trash isn’t good for the local wildlife either.  It can be eaten by fish, birds, and insects, cause suffocation, and eventually get into our streams and contribute to pollution in our oceans.  Plastics and Styrofoam are particularly troublesome as they do not biodegrade, but just break into smaller and smaller pieces that make them even more likely to be consumed in the ecosystem.  Trash on our roadsides will not help bring visitors into our county and town, or help local businesses, or bring tax revenue into our local government.

Rea stands ready to tote some trash

The only excuse for littering is laziness and disrespect.  If we love our country, and love our county, we need to stop trashing it!

Disposing of trash properly (and reducing the Styrofoam and plastic packaging that you buy in the first place) helps keep it out of the environment and helps make Warren County a nicer place to live.  The 12 roadside cleanup volunteers did a fantastic job today, collecting roughly a dozen big, contractor bags of trash, and a few larger items like car parts and a cabinet panel. There are several places around Warren County where trash seems to accumulate at an alarming rate, and this stretch of 522 is one of them.  Any time you want to get out and make a difference, you can grab a trash bag and just pick up trash.  Just be sure to take each bag to a refuse/recycle collection site when you are done.

Steve extracts bottles from the brush

The National Day of Service is now a tradition each year on the 3rd Monday in January, Martin Luther King Day, to honor the life of Rev. Martin Luther King, who “sought equality and human rights for African Americans, the economically disadvantaged and all victims of injustice through peaceful protest.”  (The History Channel website)

Susan and Lisa are ready to tackle the terrain

Several groups interested in service projects and/or caring for creation were specifically invited to participate, but everyone was welcome.  There were representatives from the Warren County Democratic committee (WCDC), the Warren Front Royal Appalachian Trail (WFRAT) Committee, Calvary Episcopal Church and even an Appalachian Trail hiker who stopped by to help.  If you or your group are interested in helping with the MLK roadside cleanup next year, or with other roadside cleanups, please contact Lisa Jenkins of Mountain Home B&B at MountainHomeAT@gmail.com.

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Who can you turn to for help investing?

Published

on

When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

Whether you’re working toward purchasing a home, financing your children’s education, or enjoying a comfortable retirement, you need to invest your money wisely. For most people, this means turning to a qualified investment professional. Here’s who you can count on to help you grow your savings.

• Stockbrokers. A stockbroker can buy, sell, and monitor investments on your behalf or simply give you advice on how to invest your money.

• Financial advisers. Also called a financial planner, a financial adviser can assess your current situation and help you develop a comprehensive financial or retirement plan.

• RIAs. A registered investment adviser (RIA) performs the same tasks as a stockbroker, but with an important difference: they can’t receive commissions by recommending specific financial products and are compensated by taking a percentage of the assets they manage for you.

• Accountants. A chartered accountant can review your tax situation and help you save on your tax return. They can also assist you when making a large purchase such as buying a home or after receiving an inheritance.

When deciding whether to work with a particular investment professional, always ask about their education, experience, and certifications. In addition, find out how they’re compensated (through client fees, commissions, or a combination of these) to determine whether there are potential conflicts of interest.

Finally, bear in mind that even when working with an experienced professional, investing always entails some amount of risk. Before making decisions about how to manage your money, you should evaluate your ability to withstand financial losses if your investments do poorly.

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Livestream

Skyline HS vs George Mason HS: Boys basketball game livestreaming January 20, 2021 at 5:45pm

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on

When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

Skyline High School will be playing George Mason High School Wednesday, January 20, 2021. JV/V Boys will be at home. JV will start at 6 PM, Varsity will begin at 7:30 PM.

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Local Government

Former Trump Administration councilman seeks town street re-naming

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When:
March 18, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-03-18T10:00:00-04:00
2019-03-18T17:00:00-04:00
Where:
SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
111 Featherbed Lane | Winchester
VA 22601
Contact:
Lavenda Denney
540-662-8616 ext. 406

A wide-ranging, hour-plus work session discussion took an unexpected turn Tuesday evening as the Front Royal Town Council reached the “Open Discussion” portion of its agenda at about 8:10 p.m. In addition to a monthly revenue/expenditure update from Finance Director B. J. Wilson and a half-hour plus Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) briefing by Town Attorney Doug Napier, the first 70 minutes saw council consider some potentially profound procedural and code changes.

Unmentioned during Napier’s FOIA briefing to council was the fact that Matt Tederick is now listed on the Town website as the Town’s FOIA Officer. – That’s strange, I thought he’d been re-upped as Town Manager Hicks’ ‘Transition Team’. Royal Examiner Photos by Roger Bianchini & TV image news agencies as identified

Those included changes in meeting procedures, most pointedly starting Public Concerns at 6:30 p.m. in order to separate them from the regular council meeting beginning at 7 p.m.; reducing the number of regular meetings and work sessions to once a month; and altering Town Codes to give council case-by-case authority to approve apartment developments in the Historic Downtown Business District, as opposed to being constrained by coded guidelines. Maybe there is substance to that rumored 60-unit apartment building earmarked for the old Murphy Building site now housing the Dynamic Life Coffee Shop on the first floor.

With non-agenda items then on the table, newly elected, first-term Councilman Scott Lloyd had several ideas, including a final one for a town street name change. Here’s a hint – Lloyd comes to municipal service after a hugely controversial stint as the Trump Administration’s Department of Health and Human Services Director of Refugee Resettlement during the migrant child-parent separation policy.

Scott Lloyd, left in a file photo, couldn’t seem to leave his federal government roots behind in his first month as an elected town municipal official. Fellow first-termer Joseph McFadden, right, focused on how to access council records so as not be blindsided on future votes as he was on the Meza appointment issue.

“And the third is to consider changing one of the streets in town to Donald J. Trump Avenue in honor of the president,” Lloyd offered. And while the January 19th discussion immediately turned to the process for altering town codes, specifically reducing the number of readings to make an ordinance change from two to one, it soon turned back to Donald J. Trump Avenue on the final full day of Trump’s presidency.

Perhaps surprisingly, Lloyd saw some resistance generated from fellow Republicans starting with Gary Gillespie. Noting his concerns weren’t political – “I think he was great, don’t get me wrong, but I think we’re opening a can of worms,” Gillespie offered. Several potential repercussions were voiced by council, including forcing potential long-time residents to change their addresses and raising the possibility of other long-time prominent locals and political figures wanting street names changed for them.

“I agree with Gary,” council’s one non-Republican Committee member, Letasha Thompson offered.

“I agree,” it appeared Mayor Holloway chimed in, in the Town’s one long-camera shot virtually broadcast Town Hall work session during which no media or public was allowed in the Town Hall meeting room due to COVID-19 pandemic concerns.

While no media or citizens were allowed in the Town Hall meeting room due to Coronavirus pandemic surge concerns, only one mask and little social distancing were evident at the council table. Any press or citizen live spectators were relegated to a Town Hall-way viewing of the meeting.

After some additional discussion during which Jacob Meza pointed to the City of Winchester’s recent bout of road name changes related to past political road naming accommodations of known segregationists, Lloyd countered.

He pointed out that Trump won Warren County by 67% of the vote in the 2020 election, “Which if it was Congress would be enough to change the Constitution, it’s a supermajority,” Lloyd offered as justification for his former federal employer’s name emblazoning a Town of Front Royal street.

Lloyd, who was unable under court order to reunite nearly 600 of several thousand migrant children with their parents because his department had lost track of the parents, then went THERE. “There” being the online conspiracy theory that the only way the man who won the presidency 4 years earlier despite a nearly 3-million popular vote deficit and never hit a 50% approval rating during his presidency, could only have lost the 2020 election, this time by about 7 million votes, by widespread voter fraud, as opposed to a growing majority of Americans viewing his presidency as a failed one that pandered for the support of evangelical, white supremacist and neo-fascist extremists.

Apparent leaders of the Jan. 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol pause to pray in Congressional chambers as the members who had been there to certify the election result was driven into hiding in fear for their lives. While not all present in D.C. in support of the incumbent president were part of the violent occupying force, what one might ask, does it all have to do with municipal politics 70 miles to the west?

Policy Attorney Lloyd theorized that despite over 60 or so courts nationally, including the U.S. Supreme Court, ruling against the voter fraud challenges on behalf of the president, the issue was never decided factually. “What people can’t argue is that they weren’t ever adjudicated on a factual basis, they were on a procedural basis,” Lloyd offered, failing to continue that the “procedural” basis was a lack of factual support of the theory of widespread voter fraud presented to the court after court across the nation.

“And that’s been denied to those people who have legitimate concerns,” Lloyd appeared to continue on the theme of procedures versus facts, adding, “And then moving from that to the question of did I attend a rally or did I attend a riot? And so the people, people I know, people who went there and just had a great time, left before they even realized, are now being targeted and actually harassed by other people in this community, being labeled as bigots and rioters and everything else,” said Lloyd claiming victimization of the local pro-Trump crowd in Washington, D.C. and/or at the U.S. Capitol on January 6.

If you think I am making this odd turn in the January 19 Front Royal Town Council municipal meeting up, I suggest you watch the linked Town video, also on the Town website. As noted above, it begins around 1-hour-and-9-minutes in and continues to just past the 1:21-minute mark.

But as odd a turn as this municipal meeting took there, the agenda business, as noted above, tackled some potentially impactful topics and is worth a listen during those discussions as well. The Open Discussion that continued beyond the street renaming detour, included late meeting discussion of the potential of offering town residents town work on private-property infrastructure repairs during its state-mandated I&I (Inflow and Infiltration) upgrades, particularly targeting older homes whose sewer and water lines may need upgrading.

The potential of offering payment plans, adding perhaps $100 to monthly utility bills Mayor Holloway suggested, with liens until the work was paid off being attached to those homes, might be of particular interest to town citizens owning such old homes, several council members theorized.

Watch the Town Council Work Session here.

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