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Potential UNLOCKED: Become a Roblox Developer

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

Potential UNLOCKED: Become a Roblox Developer

In this hands-on, fully guided camp experience, ninjas learn the basics of game building and creative development in an exciting, user-generated online gaming platform called Roblox! This camp will teach ninjas how to plan, design, and build their own 3D world to create much more than just a game!

Schedule:

  • Jul 05, 2021 to Jul 09, 2021

  • Aug 02, 2021 to Aug 06, 2021

Local News

VSP 4:30 pm update on traffic crashes and disabled vehicles

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

During the current winter storm impacting the Commonwealth, Virginia State Police troopers have responded to 369 traffic crashes and 282 disabled vehicles since 12:01 a.m. Sunday (Jan. 16) through 4:30 p.m. Sunday (Jan. 16). The majority of those crashes have involved only damage to vehicles. There have been no reported traffic fatalities during this time period.

Photo courtesy of Virginia State Police.


Since midnight on Sunday (Jan. 16), Virginia State Police have responded to:

Richmond Division: 28 Disabled Vehicles & 118 Traffic Crashes
At 1:40 p.m. Sunday, VSP narrowly escaped injury in Goochland County. The trooper was traveling east on I-64 when a vehicle tried to pass it. The vehicle lost control and struck the trooper’s patrol car at the 150-mile marker. No injuries were reported.

Culpeper Division: 37 Disabled Vehicles & 29 Traffic Crashes (Photo from Shenandoah County attached… crash with minor injuries.)

Appomattox Division: 41 Disabled Vehicles & 43 Traffic Crashes

Wytheville Division: 55 Disabled Vehicles & 59 Traffic Crashes

Chesapeake Division: 25 Disabled Vehicles & 26 Traffic Crashes

Salem Division: 60 Disabled Vehicles & 53 Traffic Crashes
At 3:25 p.m. Sunday, VSP responded to a multi-vehicle crash in Montgomery County. Four tractor-trailers and a pickup truck collided in the northbound lanes of Interstate 81 at the 127-mile marker. Two minor injuries were reported. The crash remains under investigation.

Fairfax Division: 36 Disabled Vehicles & 41 Traffic Crashes

As the storm continues to cross the state, Virginians are still advised to avoid travel Sunday and overnight into Monday, especially along the Interstate 81 corridor. Open highways allow VDOT crews to safely and effectively treat the roads.

If you MUST travel during the storm, please take these safety tips into consideration:

• Know Before You Go! Before heading out, check Virginia road conditions at www.511virginia.org or download the VDOT 511 app. Do not call 911 or #77 for road conditions. Please leave these emergency lines open for emergencies only.

• Clear ALL snow and ice from the roof, trunk, hood, and windows of your vehicle – car, SUV, minivan, pickup truck, commercial vehicle – before you travel.

• Use your headlights – in rain and snow. Virginia law requires headlights on when your wipers are active.

• Drive for conditions – slow your speed and increase your traveling distance between the vehicle ahead of you.

• Always buckle up.

• Avoid distractions – put down the phone.

• As the storm moves through the state, there will be an increased chance of encountering emergency vehicles assisting motorists. If it is safe to do so, carefully move over and give these responders plenty of room to safely work.

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Community Events

Colonel James Wood II Chapter, Cowpens Commemoration

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

On 15 January 2022, the Colonel James Wood II Chapter of the Virginia Society Sons of the American Revolution sponsored a commemoration of the Battle of Cowpens at Mt Hebron Cemetery, Winchester. The battle was fought on 17 Jan 1781 near the town of Cowpens, South Carolina in Cherokee County. BG Daniel Morgan led an army of tough Continentals and backwoods militia to victory over LTC Banastre Tarleton’s battle-hardened force of British regulars.

In the lead-up to the battle, the British under Lord Cornwallis were in the process of a successful southern campaign in an attempt to defeat colonial forces during the American Revolutionary War. The British had captured Savannah, Charleston, and Camden, South Carolina in their efforts to regain control of governments in the southern colonies. Nathanael Greene was given command of the American Forces in the south with the idea of rebuilding the tattered army and slowing the British war effort.

Two weeks after taking command, he split his army, sending General Daniel Morgan to cut supply lines and hamper British operations in the remote, undeveloped areas of the south. Banastre Tarleton was sent to stop Morgan.

On 12 January, Morgan’s Army was found on the Pacolet River in South Carolina. Tarleton began an aggressive pursuit and despite the rain and flooded rivers, gained ground. Morgan retreated to burr’s Mill on Thicketty Creek. He decided to make his stand with the flood-swollen Broad River to his back on a field used for cattle grazing that was some 500 yards long and just as wide. At dawn on 17 January, it was clear and bitterly cold. Tarleton had roused his troops to move on Morgan at 2 a.m. in the morning, looking to catch the colonists in the early hours of the day.

When Morgan’s scouts brought news of Tarleton’s approach, he moved among his men shouting, “Boys, get up! Benny’s coming!” Tarleton formed his Army on the Green River Road for an attack. He was confident of victory as Morgan was hemmed in by the Broad River and the park-like terrain was an ideal battlefield for his dragoons. He had Morgan right where he wanted him. He attacked head-on, with a line extending across the meadow, artillery in the middle, and fifty Dragoons on each side.

To counter this, Morgan organized his troops into three lines. In front, hiding behind trees were selected sharpshooters. At the onset of the battle, they picked off attackers, sending the Dragoons into a retreat. With this, they moved back 150 yards to join a second line made up of militia commanded by Andrew Pickens. As they moved back, the British reformed and charged again. Morgan’s men fired two volleys and retreated to a third line.

At this point, Tarleton’s Army believed the colonists were in full retreat and they charged in time for William Washington’s patriot cavalry to come into the battle from the flank. This put the crown’s troops in disarray.

Again the British officers rallied their troops with the reserve force sent in to turn the tide of battle to the royal forces. During the noise and confusion of battle, a colonial command to the continental forces was misunderstood for retreat. The British sensing victory charged hard after the Americans. Morgan rallied his troops and had them face about and fire in unison into the charging ranks. Added to this was a fierce Patriot bayonet charge, which turned the tide of battle.

Reformed colonial militia and cavalry entered the battle, leading to a double envelopment of the enemy. The British began surrendering en masse. The battle was over in less than an hour in a complete victory for the American forces. Tarleton and some of his men escaped and returned to Lord Cornwallis’ army with news of the shocking defeat. British losses were 110 dead, over 200 wounded and 500 captured. Morgan lost 12 killed and 60 wounded. This battle was the turning point of the war in the south which led up to the patriot victory at Yorktown and ultimately an end to the war.

Color Guard Commander Marc Robinson (photo courtesy of Anita Bonner)

The ceremony was emcee’d by chapter Vice President Thomas “Chip” Daniel. Attending to present greetings were Virginia Society 2nd Vice President Ernie Coggins and Virginia Society Children of the American Revolution President Sara Cox.

Chaplain duties were led by Rt Rev Larry Johnson and Rev Jim Simmons. Marc Robinson commanded a color guard consisting of Ken Bonner, Sean Carrigan, Forrest Crain, Kelly Ford, Doug Hall, David Huxsoll, Dennis Parmerter, Nathan Poe, Eric Robinson, and Bill Schwetke.

Wreaths were presented by 2nd Vice President Coggins; President Cox; Marc Robinson, Colonel James Wood II Chapter; Bill Schwetke, Culpeper Minutemen; David Husxoll, Fairfax Resolves; Paul Cox, Colonel Fielding Lewis; Anita Bonner, Lanes Mill, Daughters of the American Revolution and Anna Cox, Colonel Alexander Spotswood Society, Children of the American Revolution.

Dale Corey gave a presentation on the battle and a musket salute was fired to commemorate the patriots who fought at Cowpens. After the ceremony, prayers were conducted at Daniel Morgan’s gravesite by Rt Rev Johnson and Rev Simmons to honor the participants of the battle.

Musket Squad firing salute l. to r. Marc Robinson, Bill Schwetke, Clay Robinson, Forrest Crain, Dennis Parmerter, Kelly Ford, Ken Bonner, Sean Carrigan, and Doug Hall (photo courtesy of Scott Straub

Daniel Morgan’s gravesite l. to r. Kelly Ford, Rt Rev Larry Johnson and Rev Jim Simmons (photo courtesy of Scott Straub)

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Obituaries

Joel Lynn Sherrill (1954 – 2022)

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

Joel Lynn Sherrill, 67, of Front Royal, Virginia passed away on Monday, January 10, 2022, at his home.

A Celebration of life will take place on Wednesday, January 19, 2022, from 6-7 P.M. at Maddox Funeral Home, 105 W Main St. Front Royal, Virginia 22630

Mr. Sherrill was born on January 19, 1954, to the late Paul and Margaret Skipper Sherrill.

Maddox Funeral home is handling the arrangements.

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State News

Youngkin: Executive Order 2 – Reaffirming the rights of parents in the upbringing, education, and care of their children

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

On January 15, 2022, Governor Glenn Youngkin signed several Executive Orders. Here is the complete text of Executive Order Two.

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby issue this Executive Order reaffirming the rights of parents in the upbringing, education, and care of their children.

Importance of the Issue
There is no greater priority than the health and welfare of Virginia’s children. Under Virginia law, parents, not the government, have the fundamental right to make decisions concerning the care of their children.

Recent government orders requiring virtually every child in Virginia to wear masks virtually every moment they are in school have proven ineffective and impractical. They have also failed to keep up with rapidly changing scientific information. For example, the August 12, 2021 Order of the State Health Commissioner explicitly relates to the Delta variant and not the Omicron variant, which results in less severe illness. The order states children under the age of 12 cannot obtain vaccines. Now children five and older are eligible.

The order also states vaccination rates for children that are now out of date. The order notes that “universal and correct mask use” helps reduce transmission. As parents and educators have observed, many children wear masks incorrectly, providing little or no health benefit. The masks worn by children are often ineffective because they are made from cloth material, and they are often not clean, resulting in the collection of impurities, including bacteria and parasites. Additionally, wearing masks for prolonged periods of time, such as for an entire school day, decreases their effectiveness. Masking may be more or less effective dependent on the age of the child.

At the same time that a universal masking requirement in schools has provided inconsistent health benefits, the universal requirement has also inflicted notable harm and proven to be  Impracticable.  Masks inhibit the ability of children to communicate, delay language development, and impede the growth of emotional and social skills. Some children report difficulty breathing and discomfort as a result of masks. Masks have also increased feelings of isolation, exacerbating mental health issues, which in many cases pose a greater health risk to children than COVID-19. Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, mask mandates in schools have proved demoralizing to children facing these and other difficulties.

While the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends masks, its research has found no statistically significant link between mandatory masking for students and reduced transmission of COVID-19. And the CDC has acknowledged that certain masks may be ineffective due to the material from which they are made or how they are worn. A review of CDC, WHO, and other local and international health authorities’ recommendations reveal a lack of consensus on the costs and benefits of mask-wearing for children in school for many of the reasons noted above. In light of the variety of circumstances confronted by students in the Commonwealth, parents should have the ability to decide whether their child should wear masks for the duration of the school day. This approach is consistent with the broad rights of parents.

The Commonwealth recognizes in § 1-240.1 of the Code of Virginia, that “a parent has a fundamental right to make decisions concerning the upbringing, education, and care of the parent’s child.” Permitting parents to make decisions on where and when to wear masks permits the Commonwealth’s parents to make the best decision for the circumstances confronting each child. Parents can assess the risks and benefits facing their children, consult their medical providers, and make the best decision for their children based on the most up-to-date health information available.

While parents of some students with conditions that increase the risks of COVID-19 infection might require their children to remain masked during the duration of the school day, other parents may require masks for a more limited duration, if at all. Masks are not the only method to reduce transmission of COVID-19. Local schools must ensure they are improving inspection, testing, maintenance, repair, replacement, and upgrades of equipment to improve the indoor air quality in school facilities, including mechanical and nonmechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, filtering, purification, fans, control systems and window, and door repair. Other mitigation efforts can be made in consultation with health authorities. The benefit of mitigation efforts must always be weighed against the cost to children’s overall wellbeing.

Directive
Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia, by § 44-146.17 of the Code of Virginia, by any other applicable law, and by virtue of the
authority vested in the State Health Commissioner pursuant to §§ 32.1-13, 32.1-20, and 35.1-10 of the Code of Virginia, Executive Order Number Seventy-Nine (2021) is rescinded and the
following is ordered:

1. The State Health Commissioner shall terminate the Order of Public Health Emergency Order Ten (2021).

2. The parents of any child enrolled in an elementary or secondary school or school-based early childcare and educational program may elect for their children not to be subject to any mask mandate in effect at the child’s school or educational program.

3. No parent electing that a mask mandate should not apply to his or her child shall be required to provide a reason or make any certification concerning their child’s health or education.

4. A child whose parent has elected that he or she is not subject to a mask mandate should not be required to wear a mask under any policy implemented by a teacher, school, school district, the Department of Education, or any other state authority.

5. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall rescind the Interim Guidance for COVID-19 Prevention in Virginia PreK-12 Schools, issued January 14, 2021, and updated October 14, 2021, and issue new guidance for COVID-19 Prevention consistent with this Order.

6. School districts should marshal any resources available to improve inspection, testing, maintenance, repair, replacement, and upgrades of equipment to improve the indoor air quality in school facilities, including mechanical and non-mechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, filtering, purification, fans, control systems and window, and door repair.

Effective Date of this Executive Order
This Executive Order shall be effective 12:00 a.m., Monday, January 24, 2022, and shall remain in full force and effect until amended or rescinded by further executive order.

Given under my hand and under the Seal of the Commonwealth of Virginia this 15th day
of January 2022.

Glenn Youngkin, Governor

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State News

Youngkin promotes unity, agenda at inauguration

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

RICHMOND, Va. — Republican Glenn Youngkin was sworn in Saturday as Virginia’s 74th governor on the steps of the state Capitol.

The political newcomer and former private equity executive is the commonwealth’s first Republican governor since Bob McDonnell’s 2009 victory.

The commonwealth also made history in electing Republicans Winsome Sears as lieutenant governor and Jason Miyares as attorney general. They are the first Black woman and Latino man to hold statewide office, respectively.

“The people of Virginia just elected the most diverse leadership in commonwealth history,” Youngkin said in his inauguration speech. “Sending a message that Virginia is big enough for the hopes and dreams of a diverse people.”

Sears emigrated from Kingston, Jamaica at 6 years old. She made history in 2001 as the first Black Republican woman to win a House seat, and she did so beating out a Democratic incumbent in a majority Black district.

“It actually encouraged me to do what I wanted to do,” said Jeanette Harris-Robinson, who is originally from Jamaica. She traveled from Florida to support Sears, who is her cousin.
“I was a little bit afraid of actually moving forward because I want to run for [office in] the city of Florida, for my city,” Harris-Robinson said. “Coming out here and seeing my cousin and looking at her — it just opened up a whole new world.”

The 30-degree weather didn’t impact turnout. Roughly 6,000 people were expected to attend, many of who dressed in their Sunday best to watch the inaugural ceremonies.

Dan and Debbie Robinson are small business owners who traveled to Richmond from Prince George’s County to show their support.
“It’s been an interesting couple of years for running a small business,” Dan Robinson said.

“It’s nice to be a part of history as well,” Debbie Robinson added.

The Robinsons own ByreBarn, an animal auction website. The couple said they look forward to seeing how the new administration changes agricultural regulations.
“The governor seems very positive in all he says,” Dan Robinson said. “Hopefully he can work with a lot of people.”

Youngkin will lead a divided government, with a slim majority of Republicans in the House of Delegates and Democrats narrowly in control of the Senate.

“My fellow Virginians, the spirit of Virginia is alive and well,” Youngkin said. “And together we will strengthen it.”

A parade with organizations ranging from law enforcement to STEM education was held after the inauguration ceremony. The Virginia Union University choir performed a song they wrote for Youngkin, which touched on the theme of Virginia united to “rebuild and reimagine” the state’s future.

“Together we’ll renew the promise of Virginia, so it will be the best place to live, work and raise a family,” he said.

Youngkin signed nine Executive Orders and two Executive Directives shortly after taking the oath, ranging from public health to withdrawing from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

The first order prevents the use of “divisive concepts” in education, including critical race theory. Youngkin’s campaign centered on ending critical race theory in public education. The theory is not currently taught in K-12 public schools but became a contentious talking point during the gubernatorial race. There will be a review of all policies to identify and end “inherently divisive concepts.”

The second-order eliminates a mask mandate in schools. Youngkin also signed a directive eliminating the vaccine mandate for state employees. The moves were made a day after Virginia reported over 17,000 new cases of COVID-19. Richmond Public Schools Superintendent Jason Kamras stated shortly afterward on social media that the district would maintain its mask mandate.

The new governor has more plans in alignment with his campaign promises.

“It’s a new day in Virginia, but the work is only beginning,” Youngkin stated.

By Tarazha Jenkins and Josephine Walker
Capital News Service

Capital News Service is a program of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Robertson School of Media and Culture. Students in the program provide state government coverage for a variety of media outlets in Virginia.

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Local News

Izzy’s arrival in Virginia nets 142 traffic accidents State Police have responded to before 1 PM

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When:
August 5, 2021 @ 9:00 am – August 9, 2021 @ 12:00 pm
2021-08-05T09:00:00-04:00
2021-08-09T12:00:00-04:00
Where:
Code Ninjas
217 E Main St. Suite 4 | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
$225.00
Contact:
Code Ninjas
540-749-2443

During the current winter storm impacting the Commonwealth, Virginia State Police troopers have responded to 142 traffic crashes and 162 disabled vehicles since 12:01 a.m. Sunday (Jan. 16) through 12:45 p.m. Sunday (Jan. 16). The majority of those crashes have involved only damage to vehicles. There have been no reported traffic fatalities during this time period.

Photos courtesy of Virginia State Police

Since midnight on Sunday (Jan. 16), Virginia State Police have responded to:

Richmond Division: 12 Disabled Vehicles & 30 Traffic Crashes

Culpeper Division: 21 Disabled Vehicles & 6 Traffic Crashes (Photo from Culpeper County attached… crash with no injuries.)

Appomattox Division: 17 Disabled Vehicles & 20 Traffic Crashes

Wytheville Division: 45 Disabled Vehicles & 36 Traffic Crashes

Chesapeake Division: 18 Disabled Vehicles & 11 Traffic Crashes

Salem Division: 29 Disabled Vehicles & 32 Traffic Crashes
Virginia State Police remain on the scene of a multi-vehicle backup on Interstate 81 in Roanoke County. At approximately 12:05 p.m. Sunday, a tractor-trailer jackknifed and the cab disconnected from the trailer in the northbound lanes of I-81 at the 134-mile marker. A wrecker is on the scene working to get the tractor-trailer re-connected, so the northbound lanes can be cleared and traffic can begin moving again. However, in the backup of traffic, there are two additional reported traffic crashes – one with minor injuries reported and the other with no reported injuries. Fire and EMS have responded to the scene. Please follow 511 Salem for information on the detour.

Fairfax Division: 20 Disabled Vehicles & 7 Traffic Crashes

As the storm continues to cross the state, Virginians are still advised to avoid travel Sunday and overnight into Monday. especially along the Interstate 81 corridor. Open highways allow VDOT crews to safely and effectively treat the roads.

If you MUST travel during the storm, please take these safety tips into consideration:
• Know Before You Go! Before heading out, check Virginia road conditions at www.511virginia.org or download the VDOT 511 app. Do not call 911 or #77 for road conditions. Please leave these emergency lines open for emergencies only.
• Clear ALL snow and ice from the roof, trunk, hood, and windows of your vehicle – car, SUV, minivan, pickup truck, commercial vehicle – before you travel.
• Use your headlights – in rain and snow. Virginia law requires headlights on when your wipers are active.
• Drive for conditions – slow your speed and increase your traveling distance between the vehicle ahead of you.
• Always buckle up.
• Avoid distractions – put down the phone.
• As the storm moves through the state, there will be an increased chance of encountering emergency vehicles assisting motorists. If it is safe to do so, carefully move over and give these responders plenty of room to safely work.

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Down Home Comfort Bakery

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Family Preservation Services

Front Royal Women's Resource Center

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

Gourmet Delights Gifts & Framing

Green to Ground Electrical

Groups Recover Together

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Main Street Travel

Makeover Marketing Systems

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Mountain Trails

National Media Services

Ole Timers Antiques

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Examiner

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Oak Computers

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Salvation Army

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

St. Luke Community Clinic

Studio Verde

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

The Vine and Leaf

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

Front Royal
28°
Mostly Cloudy
7:28am5:17pm EST
Feels like: 25°F
Wind: 5mph SSW
Humidity: 94%
Pressure: 29.08"Hg
UV index: 0
TueWedThu
37/23°F
46/30°F
36/9°F

Upcoming Events

Jan
19
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 19 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Jan
20
Thu
7:00 pm FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
Jan 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
The Front Royal Women’s Resource Center presents: WomanGathering – 7 PM, Virtual via Zoom Webinar with guest Dawn Devine, the Executive Director for the Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum. Topic: Why Children are our most valuable resource. Click[...]
Jan
21
Fri
1:00 pm FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
Jan 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
January 21 – FRWRC Book Circle – Free Virtual Event – Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. Questions about FRWRC Online Book Circle, please contact: Lyn Bement at dlbement@comcast.net or (540) 635-3000. In person Book Circle Postponed until[...]
Jan
26
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 26 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Jan
28
Fri
12:30 pm Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and... @ ONLINE
Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and... @ ONLINE
Jan 28 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education @ ONLINE
Northwestern Prevention Collaborative, in conjunction with Northwestern Community Services Board, will offer a free, virtual REVIVE! Training on January 28th from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm. The one-hour online class provides an overview of how[...]
Feb
2
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Feb 2 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Feb
4
Fri
all-day First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Feb 4 all-day
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Come celebrate First Friday! Downtown businesses will be open late, until 8 p.m., on the first Friday and Saturday of each month.
Feb
5
Sat
all-day First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Feb 5 all-day
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Come celebrate First Friday! Downtown businesses will be open late, until 8 p.m., on the first Friday and Saturday of each month.
9:00 am Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Feb 5 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Women's Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Women’s Wellness Workshop – Virtual via Zoom Webinar – Key Note Speaker Dr. Neema. Registrations will begin January 5: frontroyalwomenswellness.com
4:30 pm Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Feb 5 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area: Discover our International Dark-Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and light conservation. Then join NASA Jet Propulsion[...]