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Sketching with Pencils

Published

on

When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

Pencil sketching is a great way to capture a visual record of your experiences and ideas. This class will give students a strong foundation for making pencil images for a journal or sketchbook. Principles for good sketching techniques will be explored including shape, composition, value, and line quality.

Thursday afternoons, 4:00-6:30pm, Sept. 12, 19, 26, Oct. 3. Classes will be held in our upstairs studio at 205 E. Main St., Front Royal, Virginia.

Class fee: $180 per person. Materials are not included. List if materials is available on our website.About the instructor:  An award-winning, self-taught artist, Armand is a full-time oil & watercolor painter represented by galleries across the United States. Armand has had numerous One-Man Exhibitions and his work is found in notable corporate and private collections around the world.


Class policies: We understand that scheduling conflicts do happen. You may cancel your class for a full refund up to 48 hours before the first class, by phone or in person. No refunds will be issued after this time.

In case of inclement weather, we will reschedule the class. Please check our Facebook page for updates on class cancellations due to weather.

Local News

I-66 Outside the Beltway Project: Lane closures and traffic changes – Week of September 22, 2019

Published

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When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project construction continues throughout the corridor during daytime and overnight hours as weather conditions allow. Current activities include:

• Lifting of bridge beam at the I-66/Route 28 Interchange

• Constructing bridge foundations at I-495, Route 28, and Route 123 interchanges

• Constructing retaining walls along I-66 and Route 28

• Demolishing structures

• Small charge dynamite operations along I-66 in Prince William County

• Clearing trees and brush, grading, and installing drainage throughout the corridor

• Demolishing closed ramps at Route 123 Interchange

• Bridge work for new Bull Run Drive overpass

• Bridge work for the new I-66 West collector-distributor road over Route 234 Business (Sudley Road)

• Continued work at the future park and ride lots at University Boulevard (Gainesville) and Balls Ford Road (Manassas)

• Continued work on the new E.C. Lawrence Park Access Road

• Relocating underground and overhead utilities along I-66 and Route 28

• Corridor-wide roadway maintenance as needed

The Transform 66 Outside the Beltway project will add express lanes stretching 22.5 miles from the Capital Beltway to Route 29 in Gainesville, rebuild major interchanges along the I-66 corridor, create thousands of new park and ride spaces, and expand trail options for cyclists and pedestrians. Learn more at Transform66.org.

Upcoming Lane Closures and Traffic Changes
The following planned lane closures are expected to have significant traffic impacts. All work is subject to change based on weather and schedule. Find the latest information on travel conditions and work zones by visiting 511virginia.org or downloading the Virginia511 app.

ROUTE 29 / GAINESVILLE
Ramp from I-66 East to Route 234 (Prince William Parkway) South
Tuesday, Sept. 24: Midnight to 4 a.m.
Overnight ramp closure for crews to shift lanes on the ramp. Traffic will be detoured farther east to Route 234 Business (Sudley Road), make a left at the traffic signal onto northbound Sudley Road, follow signs to I-66 West, and then exit onto Route 234 (Prince William Parkway).

ROUTE 234 BUSINESS (SUDLEY ROAD) / MANASSAS
I-66 East from Route 234 Business to Route 29 Centreville
Monday, Sept. 23, through Thursday, Sept. 26: 7 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Sept. 28: 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for paving operations.

I-66 West from Route 29 Centreville to Route 234 Business
Sunday, Sept. 22: 9 p.m.to 5 a.m.
Monday, Sept. 23, through Thursday, Sept. 26: 9 p.m. to 10 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Sept. 28: 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for paving operations.

ROUTE 28 (SULLY ROAD) / CENTREVILLE
I-66 East from Compton Road to east of Route 28
Ramp from I-66 East to Route 28 North
Sunday, Sept. 22, through Thursday, Sept. 26: 11 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Three lanes will be closed with periodic 30-minute stoppages on I-66 East at Route 28 nightly between 11 p.m. and 4 a.m. for crews to lift bridge beams into place over I-66. The ramp from I-66 East to Route 28 North will also be closed. Traffic will be detoured farther east to Route 286 (Fairfax County Parkway) North, then follow signs to I-66 West back to Route 28 North. All lanes will reopen by 5 a.m. each morning.

Route 28 North between Route 29 and I-66
Tuesday, Sept. 24, through Thursday, Sept. 26: 11 p.m. to 4 a.m.
There will be a full closure of Route 28 North at I-66 each night for crews to install bridge beams over Route 28. The ramp from I-66 East to Route 28 North will also be closed. Traffic will be detoured farther east to Route 286 (Fairfax County Parkway) North, then follow signs to I-66 West back to Route 28 North.

Route 28 South between Braddock Road and I-66
Tuesday, Sept. 24, throughThursday, Sept. 26: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed each night for crews to install bridge beams over Route 28. The ramp and two left turn lanes from Route 28 South to I-66 East will also be closed nightly from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. Traffic will be detoured farther south to Route 29 (Lee Highway) North, stay right for Route 28 North, then follow signs to I-66 East.

I-66 East from Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) to Route 29 Centreville
Monday, Sept. 23, through Thursday, Sept. 26: 7 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 27, through Saturday, Sept. 28: 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for paving operations.

I-66 West from Route 29 Centreville to Route 234 Business
Sunday, Sept. 22: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Monday, Sept. 23, through Thursday, Sept. 26: 9 p.m. to 10 a.m.
Friday, Sept. 27, and Saturday, Sept. 28: 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for paving operations.

ROUTE 286 (FAIRFAX COUNTY PARKWAY)
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

ROUTE 50 / FAIRFAX
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

ROUTE 123 (CHAIN BRIDGE ROAD) / OAKTON – CITY OF FAIRFAX
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

ROUTE 243 (NUTLEY STREET) / VIENNA
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

I-495 (CAPITAL BELTWAY)
I-66 West from I-495 to Gallows Road
Ramp from I-495 North Express Lanes to I-66 West
Sunday, Sept. 22, through Friday, Sept. 27: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Two left lanes will be closed on westbound I-66 for new Gallows Road bridge construction in center median. The ramp from the northbound I-495 Express Lanes to westbound I-66 will be closed nightly. The ramp from the northbound I-495 Express Lanes to westbound I-66 will be closed nightly, with a detour to I-66 East to Route 7 (Leesburg Pike) West, make a left at the traffic signal, then stay to the right and follow signs to I-66 West.

Ramp from I-66 East to I-495 North
Wednesday, Sept. 25, and Thursday, Sept. 26: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Single lane closure for bridge work. Drivers should expect occasional 20-minute stoppages and slowdowns on the ramp.

Ramp from I-66 West to I-495 South
Saturday, Sept. 28: Midnight to 5 a.m.
Overnight ramp closure for crews to set concrete barrier. Traffic will be detoured farther west to Nutley Street South, stay to the right for I-66 East, then follow signs to I-495 South.

Ramp from I-495 North Express Lanes to I-66 East
Saturday, Sept. 28: Midnight to 5 a.m.
Overnight ramp closure for crews to shift lanes. Traffic will be detoured to I-66 West to Nutley Street South, stay to the right and follow signs to I-66 East.

Commuter Alternatives
VDOT and the project team have invested in a broad range of programs to help commuters and others stay mobile and safe during construction. Learn more about carpool, vanpool, telework, and commuter bus alternatives.

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Local Government

Sign, sign everywhere a sign

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on

When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

This is the season where political signs are everywhere. Questions have been asked about these signs. The answers in this conversation with Warren County Zoning Administrator Joe Petty and Front Royal Zoning Administrator Jeremy Camp. They are in the Royal Examiner studio with our publisher Mike McCool.

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Legislative Update

Sixth District Perspectives with Congressman Ben Cline – September 21, 2019

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When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

This week I had the pleasure of welcoming U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Perdue, to Virginia’s Sixth Congressional District. Agriculture is the lifeblood of rural America, and the industry employs more than half a million Virginians throughout the Commonwealth.

Knowing the importance of the dairy industry is to our district, I asked Secretary Perdue to join me on a tour of Mt. Crawford Creamery in Mt. Crawford, VA. While there, the Secretary and I had the chance to see their operation firsthand and gained a better understanding of what it takes to succeed in the dairy industry. We also heard about the issues family farms in our region face, especially when it comes to the tariffs and crippling taxes imposed by the federal government. When the creamery’s owner passed away in 1997, his two sons were left with a massive estate tax that severely depleted their cash reserves. Fortunately, through their hard work, passion, and innovation, they were able to overcome the government’s roadblock and continue to remain successful to this day.

Following the tour, Secretary Purdue and I hosted an agriculture listening session with various stakeholders from the area. I was pleased that the Secretary and I had the opportunity to hear directly from farmers and producers in our district about the difficulties they face each and every day. I thank Secretary Purdue for coming to the Sixth District and look forward to working with him to ensure the long-term success of Virginia farmers.

Congress Passes Short-Term Funding Bill:
This week, Congress passed a continuing resolution (CR) to avoid a government shutdown at the end of the 2019 fiscal year on September 30. This temporary funding bill merely pushes discussion on important spending issues off until after November 21 and almost certainly ensures that Congress will be pressured to pass another bloated omnibus spending bill for 2020.

Our appropriations process is broken. CRs are intended to be used only in extreme circumstances, but yet again, the Senate has failed in their duty to pass any appropriations bill at all. Year after year, Congress uses CRs, which should be the option of last-resort, to postpone—or rather, altogether avoid—its duty to pass a responsible budget. During my time in the Virginia General Assembly, I worked to ensure that our rules required that the state’s budget deal be available for review for 48 hours before the General Assembly voted on it. This kind of transparency is important for our government. Unfortunately, our federal government does not heed the same rule, even when it’s required of them. In violation of the 72-hour House rule, the CR was considered less than 24 hours after its introduction.

Passing this CR is bad for our country. It extends funding for some programs beyond their originally prescribed levels, and it perpetuates an inability of Congress to properly wield its constitutional power of the purse to carry out annual appropriations. Our continued failure to control spending and address our mounting debt is a threat to our nation, our economy, and our children. Going forward, Congress must make meaningful changes to the appropriations process.

Congress Honors NASA’s “Hidden Figures”:
The House also honored several notable women this week. H.R. 1396, the Hidden Figures Congressional Gold Medal Act, awarded Congressional Gold Medals to Katherine Johnson and Dr. Christine Darden and posthumously awarded Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson. Much of the success of the early space program, including the 1969 Apollo moon landing, would not have been possible without the minds of these brave and brilliant women.

Katherine Johnson began her career as a “computer” in the segregated West Area Computing unit at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Despite the discrimination she initially faced, Johnson became one of the most instrumental figures in getting American astronauts in space and to the moon. Dr. Christine Darden’s work as a NASA aerospace engineer revolutionized aerodynamics design. Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, like Johnson, began in Langley’s West Area Computing unit. Vaughan, an expert FORTRAN programmer, became NASA’s first African-American supervisor. Jackson, a native Virginian, worked in and studied theoretical aerodynamics and contributed a dozen technical papers on the boundary layer of air around airplanes.

These four women, also known as the “Hidden Figures,” were integral to the success of the early space program, and their stories exemplify the experiences of the other brilliant women who played an integral role in building the space program in the World War II and Cold War era. Our nation owes them a great debt and a grand show of gratitude.

For the latest updates from Washington, please follow my social media accounts: Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your Congressman. If my office can ever be of assistance, please contact my Washington office at (202) 225-5431.

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Local News

TOWN TALK: A conversation with local entrepreneurs on bringing economic development to our community

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When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

Town Talk is a new series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea, topic or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to: news@RoyalExaminer.com

In this talk, we’ll meet Robert Hupman, Candidate for South River District, Ben Ferri, local real estate expert, Lloyd Knight, financial advisor, Alex Stieb, Lux Solutions and Stan Murzyn, SimpleRoof.

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Local News

Wildcat golfers suffer close loss to Hawks

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When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

Junior Michael Kelly led Wildcats in tough loss to Skyline on Wednesday

The WCHS Golf team had a match Wednesday, September 18, at Shenandoah Valley Golf Course in Front Royal. The team lost a hard fought match against Skyline High School 191 – 194. WCHS Coach, Matt Wadas, stated that “although they lost the match, the team had fun and played well. Jackson Pond posted a personal best of 47.”

WCHS junior Michael Kelly was top finisher for the Wildcats, placing second in the match, shooting a 45. Jackson Pond placed third overall in the match. First year Wildcat Will Waller shot a 50, placing third for Wildcats.

The Wildcats’ next match will be the District Conference Match on Monday, September 23 at Bryce Resort Golf Course at Basye, VA.

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Automotive

A history of roads in Virginia: Strengthening the organization

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When:
September 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
2019-09-12T16:00:00-04:00
2019-09-12T18:30:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A E. Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$180 per person
Contact:
Art in the Valley
540-252-2260

A mowing crew works on the median of I-95 north of Ashland in 1965.

Other study commission recommendations led in 1964 to steps aimed at equipping the Department of Highways to better meet the growing challenge. The General Assembly established the urban street system as a separate entity for the distribution of highway funds and directed that it receive a minimum of 14 percent of all revenue exclusive of federal interstate funds.

The urban system was to include extensions of the state’s primary routes within cities and towns and other local streets of adequate width and surface. Eighty-five percent of the cost of building improvements on this system was to be paid for with state highway funds or with a combination of state and federal funds, with the local governments providing the remaining 15 percent. In addition, millions of dollars in state road-user revenue were to be returned to the cities and towns each year for maintenance of local streets.

As another result of the study commission, the Department of Highways was reorganized to reduce the number of individuals reporting directly to the commissioner, giving him more hours a day to concentrate on broad policy and administrative issues.

The new organizational structure provided for the commissioner to carry out his assignment largely through the delegation of responsibility to two persons — a deputy commissioner-chief engineer and a director of administration. The division organization also was to be changed somewhat to more effectively meet the public’s highway needs. Its landscape division, organized in 1930 to deal mainly with erosion control, beautification, and outdoor advertising control, was expanded into an environmental quality division to coordinate increasing ecological considerations. A metropolitan transportation planning division was established to prepare long-range, comprehensive plans for more than 45 cities and towns and to aid in development of urban mass transit  improvements. A data processing division was formed to take maximum advantage of the remarkable time savings permitted through computers. A management services division became  responsible for ensuring implementation of internal policies and procedures.

Through the 1960s and into the ‘70s, the emphasis of the organization continued largely on the interstate and arterial programs, and on upgrading older routes by elimination of obsolete bridges, poor alignment, and curves. The factor of “need” was added to others, such as population, land area, miles of road, and vehicular miles of travel, which long had been considered in apportioning funds.

Improvements also continued on the secondary road system. By 1972, four decades after the system was established, 27,000 secondary roads were hard-surfaced, compared to 2,000 miles at the outset. Only 400 miles remained unsurfaced, and most of them served fewer than a dozen vehicles daily. The public’s investment in Virginia’s highways was valued at more than $5 billion. With nearly 12,000 employees, the Department of Highways was the largest agency in state government and was among the half-dozen largest employers in the commonwealth.

A strong corps of private contractors had developed, and major construction projects were built under contracts awarded on a low-bid basis. Prospective bidders on this work were required to be “pre-qualified” on the basis of their experience, manpower, equipment, and financial resources, to ensure satisfactory completion of contracts.

Questions about the importance of road and bridge maintenance had vanished long before, and millions of dollars were spent annually to protect the public’s investment and to keep the facilities in safe condition.

Some 5,000 department employees were assigned to maintenance operations — snow and ice control, roadside mowing, as well as resurfacing, clearing side ditches, collecting litter, and a multitude of other jobs. The road system they maintained had become the nation’s third-largest, covering about 51,000 miles. But for maintenance personnel, the demands sometimes were far from routine. The night of Aug. 19, 1969, was an example.

It was then that rains from Hurricane Camille touched off flooding that swept across large portions of western and central Virginia, striking while people slept. The U.S. Weather Bureau said later that 27 inches of rain had fallen in about eight hours near the little community of Massies Mill in Nelson County. Great torrents of water streamed down the mountainsides, uprooting trees that became battering rams against the houses below. Ordinarily tranquil rivers and creeks poured out of their banks and rushed ahead with massive destruction. Some said it was the worst storm in America’s history, and it struck hard at much of the nation’s East Coast. In Virginia 114 persons were killed, 37 others were missing, and more than 100 were injured.

Two hundred miles of the state’s roads were destroyed, and nearly 100 bridges were wrecked. The cost of repairing the facilities alone would exceed $20 million. Less than three years later, on the night of June 19, 1972, rain from a new hurricane — one called Agnes and considered a tropical storm by the time it reached Virginia — caused similar destruction over a wider area from the western regions to the coast.

At least 13 people died; dozens were injured. The property damage climbed above that of Camille, and estimates placed the toll at $160.7 million. Six hundred miles of roads were damaged; 104 bridges were left useless — washed away, heavily damaged, or without passable approaches.

Road maintenance crews hadn’t seen problems of these proportions before. Yet, they worked around the clock, and traffic was moving again within hours in many of the flood-wrecked areas and within a few days in most other places. The urgency was underscored because frequently other emergency and rescue operations could not proceed until roads were reopened and river and creek crossings were restored.

Produced by the
Virginia Department of Transportation
Office of Public Affairs
1401 E. Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23219
VirginiaDOT.org

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King Cartoons

Get Your Zombie Walk Shirt

Front Royal
74°
Rain Shower
07:0019:09 EDT
Feels like: 74°F
Wind: 4mph W
Humidity: 78%
Pressure: 30.16"Hg
UV index: 0
SatSunMon
min 63°F
90/68°F
90/59°F

Upcoming Events

Sep
21
Sat
all-day Huge Annual Yard Sale @ YARD SALE
Huge Annual Yard Sale @ YARD SALE
Sep 21 all-day
Huge Annual Yard Sale @ YARD SALE
Huge Annual Yard Sale, Sept 19 – 21 Location: 136 Passage Manor Drive, Strasburg, VA Flash Sale: Thursday: 10am – 2pm  |  Friday: 8am – 2pm  |  Saturday: 9am – 1pm
Sep
23
Mon
6:30 pm Monument to Mosby’s Men @ Front Royal's Prospect Hill Cemetery
Monument to Mosby’s Men @ Front Royal's Prospect Hill Cemetery
Sep 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Monument to Mosby's Men @ Front Royal's Prospect Hill Cemetery
The Col. John S. Mosby Camp, SCV, will lead the annual ceremony at the Monument to Mosby’s Men, 6:30pm on September 23rd, at Front Royal’s Prospect Hill Cemetery. Past Camp Commander Richard W. Hoover will[...]
Sep
24
Tue
1:30 pm Watercolor Landscapes @ Art in the Valley
Watercolor Landscapes @ Art in the Valley
Sep 24 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Watercolor Landscapes @ Art in the Valley
This four week course with instructor Elena Maza will focus on learning basic skills to create watercolor landscape paintings: basic composition and use of color and value to create a sense of depth and distance.[...]
Sep
25
Wed
8:00 am Senior Safety & Health Expo @ Moose Lodge
Senior Safety & Health Expo @ Moose Lodge
Sep 25 @ 8:00 am – 1:00 pm
Senior Safety & Health Expo @ Moose Lodge
The purpose of the Expo is to keep our seniors safer and healthier, and to strengthen communication between the law enforcement and senior communities. And have some fun and fellowship along the way! Topics may[...]
10:30 am Children’s Art Class “Back to Sc... @ Art in the Valley
Children’s Art Class “Back to Sc... @ Art in the Valley
Sep 25 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Children's Art Class "Back to School" Session @ Art in the Valley
We are offering classes for children ages 7-12 who would enjoy expressing themselves through art. The students will expand their creative side with drawing, painting and constructing, using various mediums such as acrylic, pastels, watercolor[...]
11:30 am Women In Networking @ Middle of Main
Women In Networking @ Middle of Main
Sep 25 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Women In Networking @ Middle of Main
Guest Speaker: Samantha Barber Topic: Voice for the Voiceless THIS IS A FREE EVENT – Please join us and other women looking to be inspired! “More than just another networking group.” FRWRC WIN is open[...]
1:30 pm Botanical Drawing @ Art in the Valley
Botanical Drawing @ Art in the Valley
Sep 25 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Botanical Drawing @ Art in the Valley
Learn and practice the art of botanical drawing in pencil with local artist and instructor Elena Maza. This four session course will focus on learning basic drawing skills as applied to botanicals: basic line drawings[...]
Sep
26
Thu
12:30 pm Watercolor Painting Essentials @ Art in the Valley
Watercolor Painting Essentials @ Art in the Valley
Sep 26 @ 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Watercolor Painting Essentials @ Art in the Valley
This class will teach you the necessities to create your own watercolor paintings. Setup of materials and proper studio techniques will be shown. Indispensable ideas about drawing and color mixing as well as paint application[...]
4:00 pm Sketching with Pencils @ Art in the Valley
Sketching with Pencils @ Art in the Valley
Sep 26 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Sketching with Pencils @ Art in the Valley
Pencil sketching is a great way to capture a visual record of your experiences and ideas. This class will give students a strong foundation for making pencil images for a journal or sketchbook. Principles for[...]
Sep
27
Fri
10:00 am The Fundamentals of Oil Painting @ Art in the Valley
The Fundamentals of Oil Painting @ Art in the Valley
Sep 27 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
The Fundamentals of Oil Painting @ Art in the Valley
This class will focus on proven approaches for successful oil paintings. Subject matter will be the student’s choice. No previous painting experience with oils necessary. The class will introduce students to fundamental concepts of color[...]