Connect with us

Trauma & Resiliency Training for Early Childhood Providers

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

Statistics show us that one in four children will experience trauma by the age of four. This trauma could be abuse, hunger, homelessness, witnessing violence, medical trauma, or grief.

We know that a child’s greatest learning occurs during the early childhood years. These traumas cause behaviors that we see every day in the classroom. As early childhood providers, we need to recognize the signs of trauma, and teach children how to cope with the feelings they experience.

This training will discuss:

  • Why trauma matters?
  • How trauma affects the brain?
  • How trauma affects behavior?
  • Individual resilience
  • Ways to help children cope

This training is free and open to early childhood providers, with priority given to those accepting state subsidy and serving the infant / toddler population. A two-hour training certificate will be given.

New requirement this year: We must have at least 10 people registered or the class will be cancelled.

Register: https://vachildcare.com/
Questions: donnaw@thechildcarenetwork.org

Local Government

Doug Stanley reflects on 25-years in Warren County government

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

In a statement emailed to the media at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, Stanley reflected on his time and career in Warren County.

“I have spent the past 25 years or half of my life serving the Front Royal-Warren County community, the last 20 as County Administrator. During that time, I have worked at the pleasure of the Warren County Board of Supervisors and appreciated the Board’s confidence, trust, and support over the years …

“I have been fortunate and blessed to work with an outstanding and professional staff of talented individuals who work hard to improve the quality of life of our citizens on a daily basis.

Above, the county supervisors and their administrator at distance as the meeting began. Below, Stanley acknowledged the board members following their action regarding his departure at the end of the month.

“Without a doubt, the past year has been the most difficult and challenging in my career. That said I believe we have made strides in bringing those responsible for the EDA embezzlement to justice and to recover what has been stolen as well as supporting the current EDA Board and staff to clean up the mess.

“To the community, I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to serve you over the past 25-plus years. Warren County has been able to strike a balance between economic growth and protecting the rural character, scenic vistas, and special places that we as a community treasure. I know in my heart that I leave Warren County a better community, a stronger more resilient community that is poised to continue to flourish in the coming years,” he concluded.

During that lengthy professional tenure here Stanley noted the challenges faced by the community regarding economic redevelopment after the closing of what was for decades beginning with World War II, one of, if not the county’s largest private-sector employer.

The north corridor commercial development overseen by County and EDA helped community bounce back from 1989 closure of the largest private-sector employer, Avtex.

“Over this period I have had the fortune and honor to be part of significant improvements to this community in replacing the lost jobs and tax base of the former Avtex facility with over $500 million in industrial development and the creation of over 2,000 jobs in the Route 340/522 corridor. This does not include the $1 billion invested by Dominion in the new power plant. The County has been able to attract significant retail development to the corridor which provides our residents with shopping and dining opportunities while generating revenue to reduce the County’s reliance on real estate taxes.”

And he noted the variety of capital improvement projects taken on, of particular note with the county’s public school system.

“We have also made tremendous strides in addressing the capital facility needs of our community thanks to the vision and support of the various members of the Board of Supervisors through the construction of numerous school, community, parks and recreation, and public safety facilities.

“I am proud that we have been able to make all of these improvements and additions to our community while still maintaining one of the lowest real estate tax rates in the region.”

EDA Board Chair Ed Daley will replace Doug Stanley on interim basis at month’s end

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local Government

EDA Board Chair Ed Daley will replace Doug Stanley on interim basis at month’s end

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

Following a 2-1/2 hour closed session convened three minutes after opening Wednesday morning’s Special Meeting, the Warren County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a “Separation Agreement” with County Administrator Doug Stanley and the appointment of current Economic Development Authority Board of Directors Chairman Ed Daley as interim county administrator effective August 3rd.

Daley, now retired, has 35 years’ experience in the municipal/city management field, including in Winchester; Dodge City, Kansas; Fairmont, West Virginia; Hopewell and Emporia, Virginia. He will be paid at a $70 per hour rate. Daley confirmed that he will resign his EDA board position at the end of the month with the hope of returning to it upon the end of his tenure as interim county administrator.

Following adjournment of the special meeting North River Supervisor Delores Oates, who made the motion on the Separation Agreement, explained that Stanley’s final day on the job he has held since April 1, 2000, will be July 31, 2020.

Doug Stanley, right, greets Ed Daley and leads him to the closed session discussion of the shakeup in county administration. Royal Examiner Photos/Roger Bianchini – Royal Examiner Video/Mark Williams

Board Chairman Walt Mabe said that a press release on the departure of the only county administrator Warren County has had this century would be forthcoming, along with a copy of the “Separation Agreement” about an hour-and-a-half following the 1:36 p.m. adjournment of the July 8 special meeting. The board was in open session for a total of six minutes, three on each side of the 150-minute closed session.

In the County press release Mabe states, “We appreciate Mr. Stanley’s service to the Warren County community over the past 25 years. He has many wonderful accomplishments that have helped make Warren County a great place to live, work, and visit. We wish him the best as he continues with the next step in his career.”

Over the past year and a half Stanley has been a target of criticism on social media and by a few citizens at county board meetings as a symbol of the “business as usual” governmental scenario some hold as a causal factor in the EDA financial scandal. Whether such criticism is factually based or largely opinion rooted in the length of Stanley’s tenure with the county government or interpersonal issues remains to be seen.

As the 11 a.m. meeting time approached at the Warren County Government Center, 14 county staffers from seven county departments with no business on the one-topic meeting agenda filled a number of seats in the back rows of the public seating area. One, past and Interim Social Services Director (as of July 9) Beth Reavis held an “I Support Doug Stanley” sign.

Retired and soon-to-be Interim County Social Services Director Beth Reavis holds sign indicating staff support of the departing county administrator.

Perhaps that county staff presence led Board Chairman Mabe to open the meeting with a notice that any “outbursts or cheers or tears” would not be tolerated and that he would have the room cleared by the two Sheriff’s Office deputies present if such behavior occurred. As the motion was made to approve Stanley’s “separation” from County employment over 2-1/2 hours later those staffers all remained, observing silently.

Resigned or shown the door?

The press release from County Human Resources Director Jodi Saffelle issued at 2:53 p.m. is titled “Doug Stanley Has Resigned as County Administrator”

The press release begins stating, “Warren County Board of Supervisors Chairman Walt Mabe announced today that Douglas P. Stanley has tendered his resignation effective July 31, 2020. Mr. Stanley has been employed with the County since December 19, 1994, and has served as the County Administrator since April 1, 2000.”

However, in the Separation Agreement added to the release, it is noted in Points 1 and 2 that:

1 – Mr. Stanley, at the request of the Warren County Board of Supervisors, agrees to resign as County Administrator effective July 31, 2020.

2 – The County Agrees that Mr. Stanley’s resignation shall be considered an involuntary separation as that term is defined in Section 51.1-155.2 of the Code of Virginia.

That Virginia Code Section states that, “Such member may retire without the reduction in retirement allowance required by subdivisions A 2 and A 3 of § 51.1-155.2 upon attaining age 50”.

During the lengthy closed session, Stanley informed the media that his 51st birthday was the previous day, July 7, 2020. – Well happy birthday a day late, Doug, looks like you won’t lose any accumulated retirement from this “involuntary separation” resignation.

Stanley began his employment with the County as Zoning Administrator in December 1994. He became both planning director and county administrator on April 1, 1996, and 2000, respectively; serving in the dual role of county administrator/planning director until June 30, 2008, when Taryn Logan was named planning director.

Above, Stanley kills time as the 2-1/2 hour closed session discussion of his ‘Separation Agreement’ from his quarter-century place of employment progresses. Below, flanked by Planning Director Taryn Logan, Stanley chats with county staff present at Wednesday’s meeting.

Logan was one of the 14 employees, including several other department heads, present to hear Wednesday’s announcement without the need of a law enforcement escort out of the building. Other department heads spotted, masked and unmasked, were Fire Chief Richard Mabie, Parks & Recreation Director Dan Lenz, Building Code Official David Beahm, and Reavis on an interim basis at DSS, along with other staff including Deputy Emergency Management Director Rick Farrall, Joe Petty, Mike Berry, semi-retired Finance Director Carolyn Stimmel, among others, including Administrative Assistant Shelley Hayes filling in as deputy board clerk.

See events unfold in this Royal Examiner video:

Doug Stanley reflects on 25-years in Warren County government

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Opinion

Thoughts on the debate that black lives matter

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

There is no legitimate debate that black lives matter. Without capitalization, those words capture an issue of tantamount importance in today’s America.

But there is extreme cause to be concerned over Black Lives Matter (capitalized).  If ever there was a wolf masquerading in sheep’s clothing, this is it.  This is no Aesop’s fable.  It is a treacherous strategy.  If unchecked, Black Lives Matter will destroy the very people it feigns to help – black lives.  And with them, the nation itself.

American black citizens have for decades been victimized by the very Democrat party they thought to be their shepherd.  And now they are being victimized by Black Lives Matter.  The ruse is racism.  The reality has everything to do with destruction of America and little to do with racism.

For those who doubt that our nation’s black citizens have been victimized by the Democrat party, you need only review a bit of recent history.  Democrats collect votes on promises.  Once elected they fail to deliver. Between 1931 and 2016 the Democrat party held the majority in both houses of Congress for 62 years.  Yet, year after year, city after city, the record is the same.  Failure at education.  Failure at crime control.  City after city mired in debt.

So, if Black Lives Matter were truly about racism, about improving the lives of black citizens, they would direct their ire at the Democrat Party.

But BLM is not what it wants us to believe it is.  Jeff Minick (Intellectual Takeout, June 22, 2020) peels back layers of deception.   He writes, “The reality is that BLM is after power rather than justice, suppression rather than liberation, and class and racial warfare rather than peace.”

Minick, and fellow author Mike Scruggs (The Tribune Papers, September 28, 2016) lay bare the truth behind Black Lives Matter.

The violence and destruction we’ve seen in the wake of the George Floyd killing uses smoke and chaos to conceal BLM’s true objectives.  Make no mistake.  There is no excuse for police brutality.  Our nation must face and address its law enforcement problems.  Yet destruction of law enforcement agencies in an attempt to rectify abuse is nothing short of insane.  We’ve already seen black citizens suffer still more from lack of law enforcement owing to diminished police presence.  Were these citizens in any way protected or aided by Black Lives Matter leadership?

The answer to that rhetorical question is “No.”  And that is why we must return to revealing the reality of the BLM organization.

Here, along with my own reports, is some of what Minick and Scruggs have revealed, and what BLM has been concealing.

Black Lives Matter Global Network co-founder Patrisse Cullors is a trained organizer. “We are trained Marxists. We are super-versed on, sort of, ideological theories,” she said, adding that the group’s founders sought to “build a movement that could be utilized by many, many black folk.”

Marxist?  This fits well with the Democratic Party which embraces concepts such as ending capitalism, putting limits on speech and religious practices, and fundamentally transforming American laws, government, and society.   But neither Black Lives Matter nor the Democrats recognize the truth about Socialism and Communism.

Socialism and Communism are merely labels.  Even at its height, Russia was never a communist nation.  It was an oligarchy hiding behind the communist label.  The same is true for the Chinese Communist Party today.  Minick put it this way: “Like the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, also known as North Korea, Black Lives Matter is a fine name. And like the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, that name is a mask hiding reality.”

Yet another reality behind the Black Lives Matter label is its cozy relationship with the Muslim Brotherhood and other Muslim organizations.  “The Muslim Students Association (MSA), another Muslim Brotherhood front, recently joined BLM in a Chicago protest to disrupt a Donald Trump campaign rally,” Scruggs discovered.

Need more evidence?  “In a December 2015 speech to the Muslim American Society (MAS) and the Islamic Circle of North America (ICNA), Nihad Awad, the Executive Director of CAIR, urged American Muslims to support the cause of Black Lives Matter, saying:  “Black Lives Matter is our matter. Black Lives Matter is our campaign.”

So much is Black Lives Matter a Muslim agenda item of great interest that Muslims have been creating a Black Lives Matter Toolkit.

According to Margari Aziza of the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative, “I’ve helped facilitate roundtables on Black Lives Matter at ISNA, a panel at Mosque Cares. For almost two years, I’ve been curating the Black Lives Matter Toolkit.”

It is not at all clear how Black Lives Matter members see the benefit to American black citizens given this Muslim Brotherhood goal: “Their primary stated objective is to bring the whole world under Sharia Law.”

What is clear is this:  the next time we see a Black Lives Matter poster we ought to think long and hard how that organization plans to solve America’s problems with racism.

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local News

Virginia’s phased reopening plan for Virginia schools

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

Governor Northam announced a phased reopening plan for Virginia schools which gradually opens up in-person instructional opportunities for students as public health conditions permit. The first three phases of the plan are detailed below. While in-person instruction may vary by division and throughout the summer and next year, all divisions must resume new instruction with all students for the 2020-2021 school year. Regardless of the delivery format, all students are expected to cover the content over the course of the year.

This phased approach closely aligns with those outlined in the Forward Virginia Blueprint which allows businesses to gradually open up activities. Specific gating criteria, as defined by public health officials, must be met prior to entering into each new school reopening phase. If conditions worsen and the public health data indicate increased risk, school operations may need to revert to requirements in earlier phases. At all times, schools should be prepared for intermittent dismissals or closures depending on local public health circumstances. Finally, the guidance and requirements of each phase are subject to revision and updates as public health conditions evolve in the Commonwealth.

The phases for reopening school provide the parameters of maximum flexibility for in-person instruction that a division may utilize. Nothing prohibits a locality or region from being more stringent than options permitted here, and some divisions or regions may choose to provide fewer in-person offerings in any given phase based on local public health conditions.

The state has outlined the details of the first three phases of reopening schools and resuming in-person instruction. Phase I continues remote learning as the predominant mode of instruction but permits some very limited in-person options including extended school year, special education programs, and child care for working families in school buildings. Phase II expands options to more children, including summer camp in school settings, and in-person instruction for preschool through third-graders, and English Learners – for whom in-person instruction is not as easily replaced. Phase III permits in-person instruction for all students, but with strict physical distancing that may require staggered schedules. In all phases, schools should follow school guidance from the CDC, including enhanced social distancing measures, physical distancing, and cleaning, disinfecting, and other mitigation strategies.

Virginia’s phased reopening plan
The following guidance is intended to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 transmission in public and private school settings while supporting the resumption of peer-to-peer learning and providing crucial support for parents and guardians returning to work. These recommendations should be implemented in accordance with the Forward Virginia Blueprint, any existing Executive Orders, CDC Interim Guidance for Schools and Day camps and CDC Considerations for Schools, and in partnership with local and state public health officials.

Phases will be determined by monitoring public health data and key measures on disease transmission, healthcare capacity, testing capacity, and public health capacity to trace contacts of cases, and other relevant factors. The phased approach is intended to allow a gradual scale-up of operations and local school divisions and private schools may choose to proceed through phases at a slower pace if local public health conditions necessitate. Community mitigation strategies (e.g. physical distancing, enhanced cleaning, etc.) will be necessary across all Phases to decrease the spread of COVID-19.

Summary of Phases

Allowable Programs
• Phase I is effective immediately but is not intended to change the school division’s continuity of learning plans as they close the 2019-2020 school year.
• Remote learning is still the dominant method of instruction.
• School divisions may elect to provide in-person instruction for students with disabilities in both extended school year services and school year special education services, including private placements, with strict social distancing. Students will only attend such programs if the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team agrees it is appropriate and the parent consents. Virtual instruction may remain appropriate for certain students who may be challenged with adherence to the strict social distancing and safety guidelines as determined by the IEP team and the parents’ consent.
• With the approval of the Division Superintendent, accommodations may be offered for students to access the school building for critical instructional needs, such as accessing a secure assessment, if all health, safety, and physical distancing measures are adhered to.
• As is currently permitted, child care for working families may operate in schools but are subject to existing operational requirements for childcare programs and should be focused on providing programming/care to children of working families and limited to children in the local geographic area.
• The State Superintendent may continue to consider variances for other in-person instruction on a case by case basis. Such programs should follow all mitigation guidance.
• Schools may continue to ensure the provision of student services such as school meal programs.

Health, Safety and Physical Distancing Measures
• Schools should follow operational guidance from the CDC, including enhanced social distancing measures, physical distancing, occupancy, cleaning, disinfecting, and other mitigation strategies.
• Physical distance should be created between children on school buses (e.g. seat children one per seat, every other row) limiting capacity as needed to optimize the distance between passengers. In Phase 1, schools should limit bus capacity to 10 persons to the extent possible.
• The number of persons in a classroom should not exceed 10, and physical distancing of at least 6 feet should be maintained to the greatest extent possible.
• Other social distancing precautions should include, but are not limited to:
• Restrict mixing groups of students.
• Close communal spaces.
• No large gatherings, per the Governor’s Executive Order.
• No athletics or extracurricular activities may be offered.

Phase II
• Extended school year and special education services that are allowed in Phase I may continue to operate.
• Emergency child care for working families that are allowed in Phase I may continue to operate.
• Summer camp in schools may be offered to children of all ages. Programs should ideally be limited to children in the local geographic area.
• Schools may offer limited in-person instruction to preschool – third grade and English Learners students given the unique challenges of providing remote academic and social-emotional support to young learners and English language learners. Operational requirements include enhanced social distancing measures including physical distancing and other mitigation strategies.
• The State Superintendent may continue to consider variances for other in-person instruction on a case by case basis. Such programs should follow all physical distancing and mitigation guidance.
• Schools should continue to ensure the provision of student services such as school meal programs.
• Extracurricular activities (such as clubs) may be offered if social distancing mitigation strategies can be implemented.
• Athletics should be limited to an individual or team-based practice, skill-building drills or conditioning activities that allow maintenance of physical distancing at all times.
• VDH recommends that no youth recreational/school sports competition take place in Phase II unless physical distancing can be maintained at all times (e.g. individual swimmers showing up at scheduled times to have their event timed, etc.). A competition that involves contact with other athletes should be avoided.
• If socially distancing competitions are taking place, the following conditions must also be met:
• Outdoor recreational sports are allowable if 10 feet of physical distance can be maintained by all participants and spectators at all times and all shared items can be disinfected between uses. The total number of attendees (including both participants and spectators) cannot exceed the lesser of 50% of the occupancy load of the venue (if an occupancy load exists) or 50 persons.
• Indoor recreational sports (including practices and classes) may occur if 10 feet of physical distance can be maintained by all participants at all items and all shared items can be disinfected between uses. The total number of attendees (including participants, referees, coaches, etc.) cannot exceed the lesser of 30% of the occupancy load of the room in which the sport is being held or 50 persons.

Spectators may not be present except parents or guardians who are supervising children. Spectators must wear face coverings consistent with any active Executive Orders and due to behaviors that may bring greater risk (e.g. cheering), it is recommended that spectators be separated by 10 feet of distance from other persons.

Health, Safety and Physical Distancing Measures
• Schools should follow operational guidance from the CDC, including enhanced social distancing measures, physical distancing, occupancy limits, and cleaning, disinfecting, and other mitigation strategies.
• Physical distance should be created between children on school buses (e.g. seat children one per seat, every other row) limiting capacity as needed to optimize the distance between passengers.
• Physical distancing of at least 6 feet should be maintained to the greatest extent possible in all buildings.

Other social distancing precautions should include, but are not limited to:
• Restrict mixing groups of students.
• Close communal spaces.
• Limit outdoor activities/recess to 50 people, with a priority on social distancing and restricting mixing of classrooms.
• No gatherings (assemblies, graduations, etc) of more than 50 people (indoor or outdoor).
• No field trips.
• Limit extracurricular activities to those that can maintain social distancing, support proper hand hygiene, and restrict attendance to avoid severe mitigation.
• No athletics may be offered.

Phase III
Allowable Programs
• In-person instruction can be offered for all students, however, strict social distancing measures should be implemented.
• Remote learning exceptions and teleworking should be options for students and staff who are at a higher risk of severe illness.
• Mitigation strategies may impact operations and capacity limits. A multi-faceted instructional approach should be planned for Phase III.

Health, Safety and Physical Distancing Measures
• Social distancing and other measures will remain important prevention strategies. Additional operational requirements will include measures such as physical distancing, gathering limits, and other mitigation strategies (e.g. face coverings, class size limitations, etc). Schools should follow all guidance from the CDC.
• Physical distance should be created between children on school buses (e.g. seat children one per seat, every other row) limiting capacity as needed to optimize the distance between passengers.
• Physical distancing of at least 6 feet should be maintained to the greatest extent possible in all buildings.

Other social distancing precautions should include, but are not limited to:
• Consider restricting mixing groups of students.
• Consider closing or stagger use of communal spaces.
• Limit outdoor activities/recess to 50 people, with a priority on social distancing and restricting mixing of classrooms.
• Large gathering limits to be determined by Executive Order in effect at that time.
• Athletics and extracurricular activities may continue with some mitigation measures. More guidance will be forthcoming.

Beyond Phase III
• School divisions will return to a “new normal” for instructional and extracurricular operations in consultation with public health officials.
• Some restrictions may still be in place at such a time.
• Additional guidance will be forthcoming as public health data, safety precautions, and guidance evolve.

Public Health Guidance for All Phases
Schools should follow all CDC guidance for reopening schools. This includes, but is not limited to, the following:
• Implement strategies to prioritize the health of staff and students, mitigate disease transmission and maintain healthy environments.
• Provide remote learning exceptions and teleworking options for students and staff who are at a higher risk of severe illness.
• Daily health screenings should be conducted for staff and students upon arrival. These should be done safely and respectfully, in accordance with privacy laws.
• At this time, public health is still developing its contact investigation guidance/outbreak response guidance for school settings.
• Staff and students should use cloth face coverings when physical distancing cannot be maintained, as is medically and developmentally appropriate. Face coverings are most essential in times when physical distancing is difficult.
• Cloth face coverings should be worn by staff in times when at least 6 feet of physical distancing cannot be maintained. For example, a teacher standing in a classroom 7 feet from students
could teach without a face covering. During meetings or gatherings or in narrow hallways or other settings where physical distancing may not be easy to maintain, a face covering would
be prudent to wear. Other considerations such as speaking loudly, singing, etc. should be considered and may require additional distance.
• The role of children in the transmission of COVID19 is unclear at this time. Face coverings may be challenging for students, especially younger students, to wear in all-day settings such as school.
• Cloth face coverings are most important to wear in times when physical distancing cannot be maintained. Schools will have other prevention strategies in place (e.g. health screenings,
physical distancing, enhanced hygiene and cleaning protocols, limits on gatherings, etc.).
• Schools should encourage the use of face coverings in students as developmentally appropriate in settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained. Schools should strongly encourage older students (e.g. middle or high school) to use face coverings in settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained.

Local Division Plans
Before entering Phase II and III, every school in Virginia will be required to submit to the VDOE, and make publicly available, a plan outlining their strategies for mitigating public health risk of COVID-19 and complying with CDC and VDH recommendations, including face-covering policies and procedures. The Virginia Council for Private Education (VCPE) will receive plans submitted by private schools accredited through a VCPE Approved State Recognized Accrediting Association.

Additionally, public school divisions will be required to submit to the VDOE, a plan for providing new instruction to all students in the 2020-2021 academic year, regardless of phase or the operational status of the school at the time. This plan must also include strategies to address learning lost due to spring 2020 school closures. This should include a plan for fully remote instruction should public health conditions require it. Plan templates and additional guidance from VDOE is forthcoming.

New survey: Warren County Public Schools need feedback on fall back-to-school plans

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local News

Town Talk: A conversation with Fern Vazquez, community garden update

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

In this Town Talk, we’ll have a conversation with Fern Vazquez about the community “victory garden” off Luray Avenue. Fern gives us an update since it was planted in mid-May with a group of nearly two dozen volunteers.

You can still participate in this community project by volunteering to help harvest the crop or just pull weeds. They are also seeking volunteer canners in anticipation of a large tomato crop.  Volunteers are required to sign waivers, which are available at Fussell Florists or by e-mailing CHEOcommunitygarden@gmail.com. The telephone number to call is (757) 630-2362 to reach Fern Vazquez.

Let’s embrace this community effort and be generous with others when reaping our own gardens and filling our pantry shelves. Learn more on their Facebook page.

Town Talk is a series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders, and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea, topic, or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to news@RoyalExaminer.com

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Legislative Update

Cline to hold Coronavirus Update Telephone Town Hall July 9th

Published

on

When:
February 29, 2020 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
2020-02-29T11:00:00-05:00
2020-02-29T12:30:00-05:00
Where:
Samuels Public Library
330 East Criser Rd. | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
The Child Care Network

Congressman Ben Cline (VA-06) announced that he will host a Coronavirus Update Telephone Town Hall. Cline will be joined on this call by Dr. Laura Kornegay, the Health Director of Central Shenandoah Health District at the Virginia Department of Health, and Steve Bulger, the Acting Regional Administrator for Mid-Atlantic Region III of the Small Business Administration.

The telephone town hall will take place Thursday, July 9, 2020, from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Constituents planning to participate should register at cline.house.gov/live or dial (855) 933-0825 during the time of the call.

“I look forward to hearing from constituents from across the Sixth District this week,” Cline said. “This telephone town hall will not only give me the opportunity to engage directly with those I represent but will also allow me to provide them with the latest information regarding the health and economic implications stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic.”

This event will mark the third coronavirus telephone town hall held by Congressman Cline since the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic.

Share the News:
Continue Reading

King Cartoons

Front Royal
70°
Clear
5:56am8:40pm EDT
Feels like: 70°F
Wind: 2mph W
Humidity: 88%
Pressure: 29.94"Hg
UV index: 0
ThuFriSat
91/68°F
90/70°F
88/68°F