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Veterans Services Meeting at Able Forces

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on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

Able Forces Foundation will once again be hosting a visit by Andre Miller, Resource Specialist, Virginia Veteran and Family Support, Department of Veteran Services, Commonwealth of Virginia, and Danielle Cullers, Homeless Veteran Advocate-Volunteers of America on Friday, January 24, 2020, from 9am to Noon. As the VA does not have an office here any longer, Able Forces is making space available each month so that local veterans and their families have local access to VA representatives regarding claims, forms, or any other matter related to Veteran issues.

If you are interested in meeting with Andre or Danielle, please call our office at 540-631-9600 to make an appointment, or just come by 115 Chester Street, Suite B.

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Curved shapes: a 2020 design trend to try

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on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

Forget geometric forms and strong lines – 2020 is all about bringing the shapes found in nature into your home. Curves and arcs revitalize interior spaces and rounded shapes lend energy and inspiration. Here’s how to in¬corporate this trend into your home.

Furniture
Be on the lookout for C-shaped sofas, round dining tables, and chairs with curved backs and arms. In the bedroom, consider updating your bed frame for one that features a circular headboard or placing an oval bench under your window.

Accessories

If you’re not in the market for new furniture this year, turn to your accessories. Arrange bowls or round vases in pleasing clusters, or install globe-shaped light fixtures. You can also adorn your sofa with round cushions and dot- or wave-printed throws.

This year’s hottest home decorating trend is easy to try. Best of all, it can work in practically any room, regardless of space’s style and features.

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Home

3 benefits of opting for a custom-designed pool

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on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

Are you thinking about installing an in-ground pool? If so, here are three benefits of opting for a custom-designed model rather one that’s a standard size and shape.

1. A durable product
Custom-designed pools are particularly durable and water-tight. This is because they’re usually built from a single piece of concrete or similar material. These types of pools are constructed in a way that minimizes the risk of cracks and leaks.

2. A perfect fit

When it comes to the appearance of your new pool, you’re only limited by the size of your property. You can select the dimensions and shapes that work best for your lifestyle and backyard.

3. An eco-friendly option
A custom-designed pool can be environmentally friendly, provided you choose the appropriate building materials, sanitation method, and power source. For example, you can choose a structure made of clay or gravel, a natural filtration system, and a solar-powered water heater.

Additionally, if you opt to install a custom-designed pool, you get a feature that blends seamlessly with the rest of your landscape. Indeed, this type of pool will be uniquely suited to your property.

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Local Government

County: Town’s ‘half’ equals 27% if council wants to move alone with relief funds

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on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

If the Town wants to play its own “I, Me, Mine” (with a songwriting nod to late Beatle George Harrison) economic recovery game with its “equitable” share of federal Coronavirus Relief money, it is likely to find it is playing with less than the $1 million to $1.5 million town staff said it is anticipating of the $3.5 million in CARES (Coronavirus Aid Relief & Economic Securities) money Warren County received on June 1.

That is because in a population-based model upon which the CARES money is to be distributed to smaller municipalities within qualifying county’s, an 8-3 “unit” split, or 73% to 27% distribution of those funds has been estimated by county staff. Those numbers are based on the county population of about 40,000 and the town’s 15,000, that latter number who are also county residents, as Mayor Gene Tewalt explained to council on June 1st.

Some people just have a hard time learning to play well with others – is that a current trend among some elected officials inside Front Royal’s Town Hall? Some on the County side are beginning to wonder. Royal Examiner File Photos/Roger Bianchini

Those numbers equate to $946,000 the Town would get, with the County retaining roughly $2.5 million according to the government formula on “equitable” distribution of the CARES relief funds. The process and numbers were explained to county supervisors following Tuesday’s morning meeting, at an early Tuesday afternoon, June 2nd work session.

The topic was broached on the County side during a presentation by County Deputy Emergency Services Director Rick Farrall on the County’s receipt of the $3.5 million CARES money the previous day. As Front Royal Mayor Tewalt noted during council work session discussion of the same topic the previous evening, he and Vice-Mayor Bill Sealock met with county officials Monday afternoon to discuss a mutually acceptable distribution and relief plan.

However, as reported in our story “Money, money, money, EDAs and ongoing weekend downtown walking mall” council collectively did not appear initially receptive to the two-pronged plan Tewalt and Sealock brought them from the afternoon meeting with county officials. Contacted later, Farrall said in addition to him, Front Royal Mayor Tewalt and Vice-Mayor Sealock, present were County Board Chair Walt Mabe and County Administrator Doug Stanley. Farrall also later verified that the County received the CARES funding the day of that meeting, Monday, June 1. He noted it was applied for on May 20.

As summarized by the mayor Monday night, the County proposal was to divide the $3.5 million in half; have the County and Town jointly administer a relief package to qualifying businesses and/or citizens inside and outside the town limits with $1.75 million; and let each municipality use their share of the remaining $1.75 million, based on the 73% – 27% County-Town “equitable” population formula split, as they saw fit.

“I don’t think it went too well,” Farrall told the supervisors of the mayor’s presentation to council the previous night.

“According to the formula they’re going to get the big cut of it and we’re going to get the crumbs,” as we reported of Councilman Gary Gillespie’s reaction Monday night.

Pre-pandemic file photo of council and then Interim Mayor Tederick and Councilman Tewalt. Gary Gillespie, gray sportscoat left, led the negative response, joined by Chris Holloway, near right, and Vice-Mayor Sealock, far right, to a County-conceived, partial joint pandemic relief proposal at a still-virtually conducted June 1 town work session.

Even Sealock, who was involved in the meeting with county officials the day the money was received; and who told his colleagues the County as recipient of the grant was “100% responsible” for documentation and accounting that all the money was used as federally prescribed, seemed perturbed that the County had developed a plan without the involvement of Interim Town Manager Matt Tederick.

“I’m just wondering why we weren’t consulted other than today of all days,” a frustrated Sealock said.

Despite the presence of county board Chair Mabe at the Monday meeting with the mayor and vice mayor, Chris Holloway wondered if the plan was formulated by the county administrator without county board authorization or approval.

Mayor Tewalt tried to derail the “we are being taken advantage of” train that was gathering momentum. “They want to take the $3.5 million and use half of it for economic recovery; and then take the populations and split it whatever that ratio would be of the other $1.7 million and use that the way we want to utilize that amount of money …

“But they just want to know if we would be agreeable tonight – just split the money, and use half of it for recovery and half of it to do the other (things) as far as the government’s concerned. So, we can pay whatever we have to pay and they can pay whatever they want to pay,” the mayor told council.

In response to Gillespie’s “They’re going to get the big cut … and we’re going to get the crumbs” remark, the mayor readdressed the population-based formula. “Yea, but … there’s 40,000 people in the county and we’re only 15,000. So, they should get the most of it,” Mayor Tewalt reasoned.

Vice-Mayor Sealock then explained the above-referenced “unit” split as based on a count of 5,000, with 5,000 divided into the town population three times and the county’s eight. Hence, the 8-3 “unit” or 73%-27% population-based divide of the money.

“Well, Mr. Mayor you asked us if we wanted yes or no on it – and my answer’s no,” Gillespie responded, unmoved by the numbers or the population-based distribution formula originating at the federal level with the CARES grant program.

Tederick said he believed the County had received the funding within the previous two weeks, but that Tewalt and Sealock’s presentation was the first he had heard of a distribution proposal developed on the County side.

“Well, I think they just put it together today,” the mayor replied.

As the “our money, our plan, our rules” momentum built on council, Lori Cockrell did voice a word of caution Monday night, telling her council colleagues, “I don’t want to say, no, we don’t want any money.”

Not so fast, cowboys – council’s newest member, appointed Lori Athey Cockrell who filled Tewalt’s seat after his election to mayor, urged caution against a blanket rejection of the County’s Coronavirus federal relief proposal.

“I understand the ask, I’m not offended by it; it makes sense why they’re asking. Maybe even the dollars could end up making sense when we see it spelled out,” Jacob Meza added. One repeated complaint voiced was the absence of more written documentation to accompany the mayor and vice-mayor’s explanation of the proposal, as well as the absence of a county official to answer questions.

Cutting nose off to spite …

Discussing the County proposal and an initially suspicious and negative reaction from several councilmen with Farrall later Tuesday afternoon, he reiterated a point to this reporter he made earlier to the county supervisors. That point was that the joint relief aspect of the County proposal could actually see an additional benefit to in-town businesses and/or citizens as recipients from both governments to whom they pay taxes as dual town-county citizens or commercial entities.

“You’ve got a 50/50 (split) with $1.75 million. I assume that could be more spent in-town,” Supervisor Tony Carter observed of the joint aspect of the county proposal.

A little quick calculating indicated that if the Town and its recipients were the potential beneficiaries of half of the jointly administered money ($870,000) and the Town got a flat 27% or three “units” of the other $1.75 million ($473,000) to do with as it pleased within documented CARES guidelines, their total take would be $1.34 million, some $400,000 more than taking their 27% share of the entire $3.5 million ($946,000).

Could a council rejection of the County’s CARES Coronavirus pandemic relief proposal actually cost town recipients as much as $400,000? It seems a possibility, several on the County side have stated.

“Logically, if the Town would think about it, town business might benefit better from this model … they may get more money for town business in a joint pot, than saying ‘give me my little slice and I’ll see you’,” Farrall replied to Carter’s observation.

Fifteen minutes into the work session that led to a discussion of the anticipated third party roles of the EDA (County) and Chamber of Commerce (Town) acting as distributors of funds to accommodate state prohibitions on charitable giving by municipal governments. That discussion included difficulties created by the Town’s choice of hostile, shoot-for-the-moon civil litigation, rather than good faith negotiations with the EDA.

‘Equitable’ – dueling perspectives

County Board Chairman Mabe also observed that while town officials might consider “equitable” a 50/50 down the middle split, giving each municipality roughly $1,752,000 million of the $3,504,164 federal CARES funding to the County, it wouldn’t be based in the reality of the program guidelines.

“That could be what they want,” Mabe warned his colleagues.

Who are those masked men & women? – County Board and Joint Coronavirus Emergency Management Team Chair Walt Mabe, hands extended bottom right, told his colleagues several councilmen’s complaints about a County relief distribution proposal appear based solely on a desire for unilateral control of a larger piece of the federal financial pie.

Farrall responded by noting such a perspective did not fit the definition of “equitable” as it applied to the County.

“I would dismiss any talk of saying 50% down the middle. Because that is in no way equitable to the County; nor is it how the funds were generated in the first place,” Farrall said drawing immediate agreement from Mabe and Supervisor Delores Oates.

Farrall continued to note that in counties with smaller town municipalities that rely on their county governments for essential services like schools, parks and recreation, and emergency services, the CARES “equitable” formula of sharing can go beyond population considerations alone.

“In a county that has these smaller towns, it’s not just a straight population (equation) because those smaller towns are dependent on the county for many things they don’t have to pay for. So, back to Jason’s point, this is where in the language of the CARES Act we have to determine an equitable distribution where it is not 100% population.”

“Jason’s point” was County Attorney Jason Ham’s earlier observation, “It depends on how you define the word ‘equitable’.”

Ham continued, “Warren County has agreed to equitably share with the Town, and so you could determine equitability to be based on population. But then you also have to consider that, you know, Rick here is going to save somebody’s life if they’re in a burning house in the Town of Front Royal,” Ham said of Farrall’s employer, the County Fire & Rescue Department that serves county residents both inside and out of the town limits (and a HEART-felt God Bless Them for that, seven-plus years down the road from one in-town medical emergency survivor).

“And his salary is paid by people who live in the Town of Front Royal, as well as those in Warren County. It’s however you define equitable, and that’s one way to do it,” Ham concluded of a population-and-services formula tied to the federal CARES Act money.

Not on immediate call to run into a burning building to save anyone, the County’s Deputy Emergency Manager continued, “So somewhere between the pure population split and (the cost of shared services) you could negotiate if you will. But at the end of the day it’s up to the County to determine that split. We’re just trying to be nice …”

At Tuesday work session, County Deputy Emergency Management Director Rick Farrall, standing to left, explained procedural aspects and financial responsibilities of the County’s receipt the previous day of $3.5 million in federal ‘CARES’ Coronavirus relief funding.

“At the end of the day we’re all at the benefit of something we didn’t have,” board Vice-Chair Cheryl Cullers injected, adding, “I mean to fight over it at this point – you’ve got to do this a way it makes sense.”

“Well, the County’s not fighting it. The decision just has to be made between the Town and County. And what it amounts to now is just the split. We’ll work out the details, we’ll have to,” Mabe observed.

Noting the earlier observation that the mayor’s presentation of the county proposal to council “didn’t go well” Oates asked, “What were the objections, I’d like to understand that.”

“Just, they want more money. It’s as simple as that. They don’t agree,” Mabe replied, as Oates finished his sentence, “With the equitable solution we’ve come to.

“Okay,” Oates added of her developing understanding of the situation.

For now, listen to and watch the above-described County business in this virtual recording courtesy of Warren County Board of Supervisors:

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Crime/Court

Local arrest made after purchasing pickup truck with fake check

Published

on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

On June 1, 2020, David S. Twigg Jr. was arrested for using several forged and one fake check to purchase a 2020 Ford F-250 Super Duty Pickup Truck from a local Auto Dealer. Information obtained as part of this investigation has implicated Twigg in similar scams in West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and other parts of Virginia. A record check of Twigg returned an active arrest warrant out of Norfolk Virginia for a larceny charge.

If you have information on this individual, please contact Investigator Jeremy Seabright at 540-635-4128.

Photo courtesy of Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

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State News

Governor Northam authorizes City of Hampton to implement temporary curfew

Published

on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

Governor Ralph Northam today, June 3, 2020, granted a request from local leaders in the City of Hampton to implement a temporary curfew due to civil unrest. This follows an emergency declaration signed by the Governor on May 31 to assist localities in responding to escalating violence across the Commonwealth. Earlier this week, the Governor granted authorization to officials in the cities of Richmond and Virginia Beach to extend curfews.

The City of Hampton is authorized to implement a curfew between the hours of 8:00 PM and 6:00 AM from Wednesday, June 3, 2020, through Saturday, June 6, 2020. While the curfew is in effect, people must remain in their homes and may only leave to seek emergency services or travel to and from home, work, or places of worship.

The full text of amended Executive Order Sixty-Four can be found here.

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Local News

Governor Northam announces Phase Two guidelines to further ease public health restrictions

Published

on

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
2020-01-24T09:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T12:00:00-05:00
Where:
Able Forces
115 Chester Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Able Forces Professional Services
540-631-9600

Governor Ralph Northam on June 2, 2020, signed Executive Order Sixty-Five and presented the second phase of the “Forward Virginia” plan to continue safely and gradually easing public health restrictions while containing the spread of COVID-19. The Governor also amended Executive Order Sixty-One directing Northern Virginia and the City of Richmond to remain in Phase One.

Most of Virginia is expected to enter Phase Two on Friday, June 5, as key statewide health metrics continue to show positive signs. Virginia’s hospital bed capacity remains stable, the percentage of people hospitalized with a positive or pending COVID-19 test is trending downward, no hospitals are reporting PPE shortages, and the percent of positive tests continue to trend downward as testing increases. The Governor and Virginia public health officials will continue to evaluate data based on the indicators laid out in April.

“Because of our collective efforts, Virginia has made tremendous progress in fighting this virus and saved lives,” said Governor Northam. “Please continue to wear a face covering, maintain physical distance, and stay home if you are high-risk or experience COVID-19 symptoms. Virginians have all sacrificed to help contain the spread of this disease, and we must remain vigilant as we take steps to slowly lift restrictions in our Commonwealth.”

Executive Order Sixty-Five modifies public health guidance in Executive Order Sixty-One and Sixty-Two and establishes guidelines for Phase Two. Northern Virginia and the City of Richmond entered Phase One on Friday, May 29, and will remain in Phase One to allow for additional monitoring of health data. Accomack County delayed reopening due to outbreaks in poultry plants, which have largely been controlled through rigorous testing. Accomack County will move to Phase Two with the rest of the Commonwealth, on Friday, June 5.

Under Phase Two, the Commonwealth will maintain a Safer at Home strategy with continued recommendations for social distancing, teleworking, and requiring individuals to wear face coverings in indoor public settings. The maximum number of individuals permitted in a social gathering will increase from 10 to 50 people. All businesses should still adhere to physical distancing guidelines, frequently clean and sanitize high contact surfaces, and continue enhanced workplace safety measures.

Restaurant and beverage establishments may offer indoor dining at 50 percent occupancy, fitness centers may open indoor areas at 30 percent occupancy, and certain recreation and entertainment venues without shared equipment may open with restrictions. These venues include museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, and outdoor concert, sporting, and performing arts venues. Swimming pools may also expand operations to both indoor and outdoor exercise, diving, and swim instruction.

The current guidelines for religious services, non-essential retail, and personal grooming services will largely remain the same in Phase Two. Overnight summer camps, most indoor entertainment venues, amusement parks, fairs, and carnivals will also remain closed in Phase Two.

Phase Two guidelines for specific sectors can be found here.

Phase One guidelines sectors are available here.

Visit virginia.gov/coronavirus/forwardvirginia for more information and answers to frequently asked questions.

The full text of Executive Order Sixty-Five and Order of Public Health Emergency Six is available here.

The full text of amended Executive Order Sixty-One can be found here.

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
87°
Partly Cloudy
5:47am8:34pm EDT
Feels like: 91°F
Wind: 5mph SE
Humidity: 48%
Pressure: 29.87"Hg
UV index: 9
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