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Small Business Saturday

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

Image by Scott Turnmeyer (c) (prints and other gift items with this image available at Turnmeyer Galleries.)

Remember to Shop Small on Saturday, November 30th!

Be on the lookout for Shop Small bags filled with goodies for local small businesses distributed by Small Business Committee volunteers and participating businesses. Join us downtown on Saturday evening for the unveiling of Front Royal IBA (Independent Business Alliance) Love Letters, at 5 p.m., at the Gazebo, followed by the official lighting of the Town Christmas Tree and Main Street lights at 5:15 p.m. Carolers from Valley Chorale of Front Royal will be downtown filling the air with delightful Christmas tunes.

EDA in Focus

EDA Executive Committee ponders strategies, assets and impediments

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

The Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority Executive Committee met virtually Friday, August 14, to discuss its Strategic Plan. That an economic development strategy must balance vision and process, as well as assets that make a community uniquely attractive to prospective clients versus impediments that would drive them away, dominated the 90-minute discussion.

EDA Board of Directors Vice-Chairman Jeff Browne moderated the virtual meeting attended by Executive Committee members Jorie Martin, Greg Harold, Tom Pattison, and Melissa Gordon, the latter by phone hook up as she drove her child to Virginia Tech to register for their first year of college. So, the topic of establishing a “Project Return Home” as some states and areas have to improve the quality of job opportunities available for the community’s college-educated next generation was of particular interest for her, Gordon told her colleagues near the meeting’s end.

The initial discussion focused on the process by which an updated Strategic Plan would be developed in conjunction with a refined “Vision Statement” for the EDA’s work. Then the committee, along with EDA Executive Director Doug Parsons and Administrative Assistant Gretchen Henderson, delved into the factors that would form that vision. Browne pointed to the County’s geographical location and commercial transportation access to Interstate highways and railroads as a key “Vision” variable.

Greg Harold may be flashing secret hand signals during virtually-broadcast EDA Executive Committee meeting Friday morning. Below, his organizational chart on updating the EDA’s Strategic Plan. Royal Examiner Photos/Roger Bianchini

Harold presented a draft of an organizational chart he had developed and commented that he is a great advocate of the “KISS” method of planning – “Keep It Simple, Stupid”. Maximum use of available technologies to disseminate information among board members and targeted industries was also cited by Harold as a necessary tool in forwarding the Strategic Plan.

After Gordon noted she did such strategic planning development in her real job, Harold deferred to his colleague’s professional experience for elaboration on the process of strategic planning. Gordon cited the necessity for, not only the development of a comprehensive strategic plan based on a community vision but of regular review to “establish where you are” and how the Strategic Plan is functioning to achieve the desired goals.

“When I look at the Strategic Plan I start very BIG in terms of what is our maximum potential and then break it down from there … to where are we today. And then coming up with measurable objectives over however the length of time we’re setting the Strategic Plan for; and then evaluation each year of what’s working well and what’s not,” Gordon said of the long-term game plan.

She also addressed the variables of regional economic development and Warren County and Front Royal’s place in that development. “The other thing I would say is, even though there are a lot of other counties around that are moving forward with economic development, deciding what makes us unique from them …”

Economic development assets
“Location, location, location,” Browne quoted a long-time observation about the “top three” factors in business development. “Logistics is something we have a great strength in – we are almost dead center in the mid-Atlantic; we’re eight hours from the Canadian border; we’re eight hours-and-change to Boston; eight hours going west gets you to Indianapolis; and eight hours south gets you all the way down to Georgia,” Browne recited of commercial driving times from Warren County.

“We have the Inland Port and train transportation that gets us to one of the two largest ports (Norfolk) on the entire east coast for importing and exporting goods,” Browne continued of the logistical advantages the county has as a commercial transportation hub near the intersection of two major Interstate highways, I-66 (east-west) and I-81 (north-south).

“From a logistical standpoint, one of the critical things every company looks at, we’re really ideally situated. We’re close to Washington, D.C., I could keep going on and on, on the logistical advantages that we have here that are under-utilized in what we do,” Browne told the executive committee.

EDA Board Vice-Chairman Jeff Browne hosted the Exec Committee meeting on Strategic Planning, summarizing the community’s economic development assets and impediments. The major impediment is the current lack of a unified economic development front within the county. And that’s not likely to do anybody’s EDA any good – at least not anybody’s in Warren County.

The transportation hub discussion led to another geographical consideration, the Town of Front Royal as the northern gateway to the Shenandoah Valley and the county’s natural assets of the Shenandoah River, it’s north and south forks, and the Blue Ridge Mountains overlooking the river.

“That’s one of the reasons we live here,” Gordon chimed in from her trip south to Blacksburg and Virginia Tech, likely on I-81.

“Regionalism is another area that I think is under-utilized in what it is that we do. We are, in my mind, less competitive with all of our neighbors although on specific projects we might well be vying for the same dollars on grants and the like. But the reality is that we are the Gateway to the Northern Shenandoah Valley. And if we’re doing our job well, we all benefit from it,” Browne said of an intertwined regional economy that fosters a cooperative outlook.

“To me, regionalism and working cooperatively is a much more attractive thing for site developers and companies looking to be here. I would rather get a piece of the pie by going that way, than none of the pie by going it alone,” Browne reasoned of regionalism’s positive impact on economic development for all.

Impediments to Economic Development
Browne then segued to what he called “impediments” to economic development. And ironically his referenced regional cooperative outlook has been impeded, not by an outside community, but by one closer to home.

“We’re well aware of the issues with the Town,” Browne began of a co-founding and still legally at least participating member, the Town of Front Royal, adding, “We have lawsuits and other things we’re going to have to overcome and have strategies for what it is that we do.”

We later checked with Browne on his “other things” reference. He elaborated that it was to three projects the Town owes the EDA debt service payments on: the new Town Police Headquarters, Leach Run Parkway and the West Main Street Connector Road at the Royal Phoenix site, the latter two he estimated adding about $3 million to $4 million to the $9-million debt service on the FRPD headquarters.

Front Royal’s new police station, financed for the Town by the EDA to the tune of about $9-million, remains a monthly financial albatross for the EDA.

As previously reported, on June 1st the EDA presented the Town with an invoice for slightly over $441,300 paid thus far by the EDA on the FRPD headquarters project, with a remaining balance of $8.44 million with 3% interest accruing. The Town’s response through back-channel negotiations between council members Chris Holloway and Lori Athey Cockrell and supervisors Cheryl Cullers and Delores Oates was to offer to pay a recoverable $10,529, or half of the interest-only July payment of $21,102, without admitting any legal or moral obligation to pay anything on the police station debt service.

The Town also requested and received permission from the state government to become the first Virginia municipality to be given authority to create an independent, second EDA while still technically a member of the EDA it co-founded with Warren County in 1969.

After initially championing a “reform” the EDA movement, the Town Council opted out of that cooperative effort with the re-tooled EDA and Warren County in order to sue the EDA for “at least $20 million” mirroring the EDA initial civil action against former EDA Executive Director Jennifer McDonald and seven co-defendants totaling $21.3 million. The EDA’s civil action has climbed to nearly $26 million against McDonald and 23 co-defendants, while other than the above-referenced and apparently stalled “back-channel” effort, the Town has rejected EDA offers of “good faith” negotiations to establish exactly what Town assets were involved in the alleged EDA embezzlements.

Other impediments were cited, including one created by an asset – blocked roads from lengthy freight trains headed to the Inland Port in the county’s north side. Though there is hopefully some relief coming with grant funds being accessed for a Rockland Road “flyover” to ease one of those blocked sites, he observed.

Martin also noted a hopeful contact to expand broadband service throughout the county to solve another impediment, the lack of broadband Internet connection countywide. That is a particular issue, not only for economic development but education during the COVID-19 pandemic emergency measures requiring a certain amount of home Internet virtual instruction to students while social distancing limits their in-school time.

Money and board vacancies
As with its own initiatives and Strategic Planning efforts, it was noted that budget factors were always a limiting variable on the County side as well. But it was commented that the EDA should become an advocate for the type of expenditures that will help stimulate economic development on the positive side, whether in educational funding or elsewhere.

Toward the committee meeting’s end, the matter of the two board vacancies created by the resignation of Gray Blanton and Ed Daley’s move to the County as interim county administrator was raised.

Browne said he had yet to receive word from the county supervisors who make EDA board appointments on Blanton’s seat but that he believed a decision was close. He also raised the possibility that an interim replacement for Daley might be put on the table with the understanding it would be a short-term replacement. The EDA and County’s intent has appeared to be that former EDA Board Chairman Daley will return to his position when the County hires a permanent replacement for Doug Stanley.

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Local News

Skyline High School Scholarship Winners – Class of 2020

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

The Royal Examiner congratulates the following Scholarship Winners from Skyline High School. These scholarships will help students lessen the impact of college tuition costs, and decreases the number of loans that may be needed.

Carl and Emily Thompson Charitable Trust Foundation – Top Academic Female Student  – Taylor Bolt

Carl and Emily Thompson Charitable Trust Foundation – Top Academic Male Student – Jake Ross

Acorn Scholarship – Adrianne Kinsey and Mia Ralls

American Legion Auxiliary Unit #53 Scholarship – Kirsten Renz

Angel’s Korner Scholarship – Chloe Phillips

Beautification of Front Royal – Chloe Phillips and Walker Wilkins

J. Berkeley Pomeroy Memorial Scholarship – South Warren Ruritan Club – Kristal Nguyen

Beta Rho Chapter of Alpha Delta Kappa Scholarship – Andrew Thompson

Calvary Episcopal Church Scholarship – Zane Clark and Kristal Nguyen

Cedarville Ruritan Club – Roberta Close Grove Memorial Scholarship – Kristal Nguyen

Dr. Craig Zunka & Joellen McNeal Scholarship – Matthew Presley and Kristal Nguyen

Francis “Lou” Clark Powell – Warren County Retired Teachers’ Association Memorial Scholarship – Victoria Dunivan and  Andrew Thompson

Front Royal Axalta Scholarship – Taylor Bolt

Front Royal Chapter #6 Order of the Eastern Star Scholarship – Mia Ralls

Front Royal Church of the Brethren “Circle of Love” – Thomas Stelzl

Front Royal Elks Lodge #2383 Scholarship – Teagan Johnson and Thomas Stelzl

Front Royal Little League Scholarship – Samuel Harris

Front Royal Moose Lodge #829 – Mackenzie Amos

Front Royal Rotary Club – Jenna Stanley

Izaak Walton League Scholarship – Jordan Kenney

John W. Evans V Memorial Scholarship – Carrie Gibson

Kiwanis Club Scholarship – Ashleigh Dickman

Loyd Family Education Foundation Scholarship In Memory of Cody Loyd – Kristal Nguyen

Madelyne Rose Memorial Scholarship for Justice – Destinee Manning

OH Yeah! Keith Sanker Honor Scholarship – Wyatt Spiker

Royal Fury Basketball Scholarship – Heather Brogan and Andrew Thompson

Shenandoah Area Secular Humanist Scholarship – Mia Ralls

Skyline Caverns – Sabrina Wilkins

Skyline High School “Band Aids” Scholarship – Reid McMillin-Goodwin

Sodexo Scholarship – Sophia Conrow, Hudson Fortney, Bryona Foster, Alexandra Haffer, Kayla Hudson, and Reid McMillin-Goodwin

“The Mat Time Award”/Outkast Wrestling, Inc. Scholarship – Morgan Robinson

Town of Front Royal Scholarship – Andrew Thompson

Harry G. Turnmeyer FR Credit Union Scholarship – Jacob Lowery

Virginia Sheriffs’ Institute Scholarship – Teagan Johnson

Warren County Girls Little League Scholarship – Carrie Gibson

Warren County Sheriff’s Scholarship – Morgan Robinson

Warren County Youth Cheerleading Association Scholarship – Aaliyah Chunn

Warren County Education Association Scholarship – Jordan Kenney

Warren County Farm Bureau – Ashley Foster

Warren County Retired Teachers Association Memorial Scholarship In Memory of Robert Leonard, Frank Moxie and Fern Perry – Jordan Kenney

Warren County Rotary Club – Zane Clark, Jordan Kenney and Mia Ralls

Warren Memorial Hospital Foundation Scholarship – Megan Haun, Adrianne Kinsey and Matthew Presley

Wells Fargo National Bank Scholarship – Kristal Nguyen

Wells Family Scholarship – Jordan Kenney, Adrianne Kinsey and  Thomas Stelzl

WHAT MATTERS “Hometown Scholarship” – Andrew Thompson

Winchester Frederick County Conservation Club, Inc. Scholarship – Chloe Phillips

Women of the Moose Scholarship – Heather Brogan

Lord Fairfax Community College Scholarships

Michael E. Smith Principal’s Scholarship – Chloe Phillips

SHS College Career Pathways Scholarship – Avery Smith

SHS College Board Scholarship – Mia Ralls

Blue Ridge Technical Center Awards

Pam McInnis Award – Teagan Johnson

Senior Carpentry Award – Benjamin Mandiak

Senior Nurse Assistant Award – Emily Nicola

Skyline High School Athletic Honors & Scholarships

SHSAA Scholarship – Emma Benson, Heather Brogan, Aaliyah Chunn, Zane Clark, Sayf Smadi, Andrew Thompson

Hawks Water Scholarship sponsored by Air Serv of Front Royal, Jack Evans Chevrolet of Front Royal, and Skyline Athletic Association – Mackenzie Amos, Lauren Heflin, Morgan Robinson and Andrew Thompson

Students who have earned a credential or certificate through Lord Fairfax Community College:

Samuel Baugher – Certificate: General Education & Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Emma Benson
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Taylor Bolt
– Associate of Science Degree: Science; & Certificate: General Education

Heather Brogan
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Charles Carey
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Owen Chenery
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Kierstyn Cornwell
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Sydney Crafton
– Certificate: General Education

Ashleigh Dickman
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Eve Fincham
– Certificate: General Education

Hudson Fortney
– Certificate: General Education

Ashley Foster
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Alyssa Foxwell
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Marcus Funk
– Career Studies Certificate: Basic Electrical Tech; HVAC; & Industrial Maintenance Tech – Basic

Megan Haun
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Lauren Heflin
– Certificate: General Education

Kayla Hudson
– Certificate: General Education

Alex Lalumondiere
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Destinee Manning
– Certificate: General Education & Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Seth Mills
– Career Studies Certificates: Emergency Medical Technician & Pre-Allied Health

Kristal Nguyen
– Certificate: General Education & Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Jasmine Payton
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Mia Ralls
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Ethan Reinhardt
– Career Studies Certificates: Basic Electrical Tech; HVAC;  Industrial Maintenance Tech – Basic

Kristen Renz
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

David Shenk – Career Studies Certificates: Basic Electrical Tech; HVAC; Industrial Maintenance Tech – Basic

Jenna Stanley
– Associate of Science Degree: Science; & Certificate: General Education

Jaime Stewart
– Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Sabrina Wilkins
– Certificate: General Education & Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Walker Wilkins – Certificate: General Education & Career Studies Certificate: Pre-Allied Health

Skyline High School Class of 2020 Graduation Ceremony

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Regional News

Fauquier Health offering student specials for sports and scout physicals

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

Dr. Fida and Dr. Song, Family Practice at Bealeton.

It’s that time of the year again. Fauquier Health’s Piedmont Internal Medicine and Family Practice at Bealeton are offering student specials for all sports and scout physicals at a savings of $25 each. Piedmont Internal Medicine is located at 419 Holiday Court, Suite 100, in Warrenton, VA and can be reached by calling (540) 347-4200. The Family Practice at Bealeton is located at 6200 Station Drive in Bealeton, VA and can be reached by calling (540) 439-8100.

Ultimately, a sports physical gives the provider a chance to analyze a student’s current health and uncover any health needs that could be considered as a performance hindrance. Students getting ready to head back to college can get a sports physical as a preventative care measure to ensure their well-being over the upcoming year. During the sports physicals appointments, providers have the opportunity to learn more about the students to develop long-term relationships and can offer students best practices, tips to increase performance and advice on how to reduce common forms of injury (through stretching, warm ups and exercises).

According to Dr. Christopher Nagle, at Piedmont Internal Medicine, “We at Piedmont Internal Medicine are lifelong athletes. We are ball players, marathoners, competitive weight lifters, triathletes and even aerobatic pilots. The sports physical is a focused examination geared towards preventing injury in the athlete. The sports physical is also a chance to screen the young and healthy who might not otherwise come to the doctor. We love caring for athletes – from high school to professional – to guide them in optimizing their health and fitness for maximum performance.”

Dr. Christopher Nagle, Piedmont Internal Medicine.

Scout physicals this time of year are especially important. With the warmer weather, community residents venture outside more frequently and partake in a variety of outdoor activities. A scout physical is an overall health assessment including review of the most up-to-date vaccinations and review of allergies and medications to be used for any scout activities, weekend tours or overnight trips.

Family Practice at Bealeton offers appointments through telehealth. Patients visiting the offices in-person can expect to receive their physicals in a safe and clean environment. Care may look a little different than before, but this is because all Fauquier Health Physician Services clinics have implemented new processes and procedures to further protect patients’ health in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the core elements of properly managing infectious diseases is the cleanliness of our physical facilities. The staff follows the most effective cleaning and disinfection protocols available. A major focus of keeping the facilities clean surrounds disinfection of the reception areas, hallways, and high touch areas such as chairs, desks, hand rails and elevators.


About Fauquier Health

Fauquier Health is a community health system dedicated to high-quality, patient-centered care in a unique environment that considers the multiple facets of healing and respects the individuality of each and every patient. Located at 500 Hospital Drive in Warrenton, Virginia, Fauquier Health serves the residents of Fauquier and several surrounding counties. It comprises Fauquier Hospital, a fully-accredited, 97-bed hospital; Fauquier Health Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, a 113-bed long-term care and rehabilitation facility; the Villa at Suffield Meadows, an assisted living facility; the Wound Health Center and a medically supervised Wellness Center offering health and wellness programs. Fauquier Health also operates nine physician’s offices, including primary care and specialties. More information on Fauquier Health is available online at or by calling (540) 316-5000.

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LFCC and Shepherd University sign nursing transfer agreement

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

LFCC and Shepherd University have signed a new 2+2 (two years at LFCC and two years at Shepherd) R.N.-B.S.N. agreement that will provide a seamless pathway for nursing students from LFCC to earn their bachelor’s degree at Shepherd.

Under the agreement, LFCC students who earn an associate of applied science degree in nursing, have a minimum grade point average of 2.7, and who have not matriculated at any other institution of higher education will be guaranteed transfer admission to Shepherd to earn a bachelor of science degree in nursing.

“We now more than ever need healthcare professionals,” said Dr. Scott Beard, Shepherd provost, during a July 30 virtual signing ceremony. “We’re in an area with vulnerable populations where there is a lack of access to healthcare, and there’s a critical shortage of nurses and advance practice nurses nationwide, so this initial pathway from the R.N. to the B.S.N. is just one step in those students’ journeys.”

Dr. Anne Davis, LFCC vice president of academic and student affairs, called the agreement a win-win for students.

“This feels like it’s a great fit for our students because they’re accustomed to an environment with that personal touch and small class size,” Davis said. “I think Shepherd is a place where LFCC students will find a home, somewhere where they’ll be valued for who they are as a person. It’s an exciting opportunity. It’s pivotal for healthcare in the environment that we’re in now, so we thank Shepherd for opening its doors to our students and giving them this pathway.”

“We’re just thrilled to receive Lord Fairfax students,” said Dr. Sharon Mailey, dean, College of Nursing, Education, and Health Sciences, and director, School of Nursing at Shepherd. “They’re motivated, they’re excellent academically, we just really enjoy having them here, and we want to make this their home. We also want them to keep the connectivity with Lord Fairfax. They don’t lose their identity; they just take on a new mantle of being a B.S.N. from Shepherd University.”

Learn more about LFCC’s nursing program at lfcc.edu/nursing.

Pictured (top row, l. to r.) are Dr. Virginia Hicks, assistant provost, Shepherd Academic Community Outreach; Kathryn Tagnesi, interim director, Lord Fairfax Health Professions; Dr. Scott Beard, Shepherd provost; second row, Dr. James Gillispie, dean, Lord Fairfax Humanities, Social Sciences, and Student Development; Dr. Craig Santicola, dean, Lord Fairfax Professional Programs; Dr. Sharon Mailey, dean, Shepherd College of Nursing, Education, and Health Sciences, and director, School of Nursing; third row, Dr. Michael Groves, coordinator, Shepherd R.N. to B.S.N. Program; Dr. Richard Stevens, dean, Shepherd School of Graduate and Professional Studies; and Dr. Anne Davis, vice president, Lord Fairfax Academic and Student Affairs.

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What should you do if your child has behavioral problems?

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

Is your child failing to respect class rules or acting in a disruptive or violent way? If so, you may not know what to do. Here’s how you can find a solution to this type of problem.

Uncover the source
If your child is acting in an inappropriate manner, it’s important to understand why. Try to determine if the behavioral issue is occurring only at school or if it’s happening at home too. Understanding when and where the behavior is exhibited could provide insight into the situation.

Children may act out for a variety of reasons. In some cases, it’s because their social needs aren’t being met. In others, it’s that the child finds the learning objectives difficult to meet. Tensions at home can also make it difficult for children to manage their emotions. Alternatively, bullying may be the culprit.

Work with specialists
The right professional can help root out the cause of your child’s behavioral issues. This includes:

• Audiologists
• Special educators
• Doctors
• Optometrists
• Speech and language therapists
• Psychoeducators
• Psychologists

These experts are especially helpful if your child’s issues are linked to mental health problems, learning impediments, vision problems or dyslexia. Health-care workers and trained educators can provide your child with a treatment plan. With professional help and a bit of effort, you’re likely to see an improvement.

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3 great reasons to finish your basement

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When:
November 30, 2019 all-day
2019-11-30T00:00:00-05:00
2019-12-01T00:00:00-05:00
Where:
Downtown Front Royal
Main Street | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
Front Royal IBA
(540) 635-7064

Are you wondering whether to invest time and money into finishing your basement? Here are three good reasons to go for it.

1. To lower your heating and cooling bills
An unfinished basement is often uninsulated, making the rest of your house more difficult to heat and cool. Since a key step to finishing a basement involves insulating the walls and floor, a positive side effect of undertaking this project is having a comfortable temperature throughout your home.

2. To expand your living space

Whether you want to make a playroom for the kids, an office for you, or a home theater for the whole family, the basement is the perfect location. If space allows for it, you can also convert it into a small apartment, which might be ideal for your adult children or elderly family members.

3. To add value to your property
If you decide to sell your home, a finished basement typically provides a 50 to 75 percent return on investment. In addition to the increase in value, your property will likely be more attractive to potential buyers.

Keep in mind that renovating a basement may not be as expensive as you think. This is because you can choose different materials than those used in the rest of your home. In fact, the same hardwood flooring that’s ideal for a living room is a terrible option for a basement due to the higher risk of moisture problems.

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