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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Answers to your gardening questions and problems! E-mail questions and pictures to greenhelpline.warrenco@gmail.com

Mondays from 10:00am -1:00pm, April-October (except holidays)

Come in or call 540-635-4549  *in-person and phone help available after coronavirus emergency*

Local News

Front Royal/Warren County Chamber of Commerce Candidate Forum

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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

The Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce hosted a Candidate Forum on Thursday, October 20, at the Government Center at 220 N. Commerce Avenue in Front Royal, Virginia.

The forum included candidates for Town Council, Board of Supervisors, and School Board.

The candidates for Warren County Board of Supervisors include Vicky Cook, Fork District, and Jay Butler, Happy Creek District. Write-in candidates were not invited to participate in this forum.

Board of Supervisors Forum

The candidates for Front Royal Town Council include Amber Morris and Bruce Rappaport.

Town Council Forum

The candidates for Warren County School Board include Stephanie Short and Antoinette Funk for Happy Creek District, Andrea Lo, Fork District, Melanie Salins, and Angela Robinson, North River District.

Warren County School Board

 

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Local News

School Board sets 2022 grad date; approves higher substitute nurses pay rate, GT plan

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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

The Warren County School Board chose a May 28, 2022, graduation date for high schools in Warren County and unanimously approved the education plan for gifted students in Warren County Public Schools (WCPS), as well as an increased pay rate for substitute nurses.

School Board member Kristen Pence, who chaired the board’s Wednesday, October 20 meeting and work session, along with board members Ralph Rinaldi and Melanie Salins attended the meeting, while School Board Vice Chair Catherine Bower and member James Wells were absent. Wells arrived later and joined the work session portion of the meeting.

High school graduation for both Skyline High School and Warren County High School will be held on Saturday, May 28, 2022, which is Memorial Day weekend. Skyline High School students will graduate at 8 a.m.; Warren County High School students will graduate at 10 a.m. on the same day.

In another action agenda item, the board approved the WCPS Local Plan for the Education of the Gifted for school years 2021 through 2027. New items in the local plan include the addition of an online cognitive abilities test, also known as the CogAT, and the addition of two full-time gifted and talented (GT) resource teachers, “which will really increase our gifted offense this year at the elementary level,” WCPS Assistant Superintendent of Instruction Alan Fox told School Board members.

Both GT teachers, Faith Falkenstein, who teaches at A.S. Rhodes Elementary School, and Justyne Louk, who teaches at Ressie Jeffries Elementary School, provided a presentation to the School Board and shared some of the student work examples. They said they have also started an afterschool math club for students.

In other action, WCPS Superintendent Christopher Ballenger also received unanimous approval from the School Board to request that the Warren County Board of Supervisors increase the School Board’s fiscal year 2021-2022 Operating Fund Budget by $4,062,240. The money would be distributed to cover instruction ($2,907,875); operations and maintenance ($9,721); facilities ($1,042,644); and technology ($102,000).

According to Ballenger, since the original fiscal year 2022 operating budget was adopted on May 5, there has been $4,062,240 in federal and state grants awarded to WCPS. To receive and spend this unbudgeted revenue — which resulted from the receipt of federal pandemic relief grants and several state grants — an additional appropriation must be received from the Board of Supervisors, he said.

On another item, School Board action was postponed following a lengthy discussion on the Virginia School Screening Testing for Assurance (ViSSTA) program, which is being launched by a partnership between the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) and the Virginia Department of Education.

The ViSSTA program is a new, free COVID-19 screening testing program for Virginia public and private K-12 students, teachers, and staff for the 2021-2022 school year, according to the VDH website, which said that while it “strongly encourages schools to participate” in the ViSSTA program, it is optional.

Under ViSSTA, public and private schools in the state can be matched with vendors who will conduct pooled screening testing in schools, VDH said. Public schools can also receive funding for needed supplies and/or to hire local school staff to support the program, such as school division testing coordinators, school nurses, or mitigation specialists. There is no cost to schools to conduct screening testing in schools and schools may have to assign certain duties to the existing staff to help support the program and liaise with the vendor and school community to help make the program successful, VDH said.

WCPS Director of Special Services Michael Hirsch sought to have the board approve three new positions as part of WCPS joining the program — a COVID response coordinator and two clinical support specialists — who would support the school division’s ongoing COVID-19 mitigation efforts.

The new hires would “have no fiscal impact on the school system,” Hirsch said, and the additional supports also would help implement voluntary pool screening, support building-level administrators and school nurses, and the division coordination of its COVID response.

“Our nurses and my department have been really, really bogged down… with the [pandemic] on an hourly and minute-by-minute basis throughout the last 18 months,” said Hirsch. “This will alleviate the stress on our nursing system so that they can focus on their clinics” and would allow them to get back to pre-pandemic “business as usual,” he added.

Nevertheless, because more information on ViSSTA is expected to be forthcoming from VDH and the state education department, the three present board members voted to postpone action on the item until the School Board’s November 3 meeting.

Speaking of nurses: “I can’t find nurses so I’m here to ask you for an increase in the substitute nurse daily rate,” which currently falls below the daily rate for substitute teachers, WCPS Personnel Director Shane Goodwin told School Board members on Wednesday night.

WCPS Personnel Director Shane Goodwin said that increasing the pay rate for substitute nurses would help WCPS build a solid pool of substitute nurses, which are in high demand across Virginia due to the ongoing pandemic. The board approved an increase from $90 a day to $100 per day for substitute nurses and a long-term substitute nurses’ pay rate to be set at $120 per day effective through June 2022.

Work Session
Several WCPS central office staff provided the School Board with updates on numerous items, including on Facilities, Child Nutrition, and Transportation operations, the WCPS Comprehensive Long-Range Plan for 2021-2026, as well as the WCPS Special Education Advisory Committee 2020-2021 annual report.

Other items under discussion included the advisability, scope, frequency, and method of discipline and incident reporting to the School Board, as well as possible revisions to board policy regarding Public Participation at School Board Meetings.

Watch the exclusive Royal Examiner video of the meeting and work session in its entirety, click here

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Community Events

Drug Take Back Day is Saturday, October 23rd

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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

The Warren County Community Health Coalition and Warren County Sheriff’s Office along with Valley Health will be participating in the DEA National Drug Take-Back Day this Saturday, October 23, 2021, from 10 am to 2 pm at the Valley Health Complex located at 120 N. Commerce Ave. in Front Royal.

Drug Take-Back Day is usually held in the spring and autumn each year for those municipalities who wish to participate in providing a safe, convenient, and anonymous means of disposing of prescription drugs.

This day aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible way of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the public about the potential for abuse of medications.

Prescription drug abuse is the fastest-growing drug problem in the U.S. When you have unused or expired medications lying around, they could fall into the wrong hands and be abused. Flushing medications down the toilet is dangerous to public health.

Dropping your medications off at a collection site is a quick and safe way to make sure they are disposed of properly. Drop off is free and anonymous.

Should you have any questions, contact Lt. Robbie Seal at the Warren County Sheriff’s Office at 540-635-4128.

Fauquier Health is also sponsoring a Drug Take-Back program in Warrenton this Saturday, October 23, 2021, from 10 am-2 pm at the Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office. We encourage community members to drive up and safely dispose of their unused or expired medications. The event is sponsored by Piedmont Crush, Fauquier County Sherriff’s Office, Warrenton Police Department, the Mental Health Association of Fauquier County, and our pharmacy team at Fauquier Health.

78 West Lee St.,
Warrenton, VA

By properly disposing of these medications, you’ll be helping to make your home and community healthier.


Safely Managing Medications Helps Make Our Community Healthier

By: Gary Matthew, Pharmacy Director, Fauquier Health

Most of us have taken medicine to help heal from illness or injury at some point in our lives. Medications are often an important part of the healing process and can be essential in treating ongoing conditions, but they can also be harmful to your health or the health of others if not managed appropriately.

Responsibly Handling Medications
While medications can provide many benefits, their misuse can pose a serious health risk to you and your community. According to findings from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, nearly 51 percent of people who misused pain relievers in the past year obtained them from a friend or relative. Fortunately, there are some simple steps you can take to get into the habit of practicing medication safety:

  • Take medications as directed. Carefully follow the instructions, and take your medications only as prescribed by your provider and for the intended purpose.
    • Always keep a current list of the medications you are taking, including ones you only take on occasion. Include the medication name, dose, how often you take it, the method for taking it (by mouth, injection, etc.), and the reason for taking it.
    • In addition to your prescribed medications, don’t forget to include over-the-counter drugs, herbals, vitamins, and dietary supplements. Share your list with close family members, and keep a copy in your wallet.
    • Include any allergies, the names and phone numbers of your providers, and your preferred pharmacy on this list.
    • Don’t hesitate to ask your provider or pharmacist if you have questions about side effects or drug interactions with your medications.
  • Do not share your medications with others. While this gesture may be well-intended, medicines can be just as dangerous as street drugs when taken without a prescription or if not used for the right reasons.
  • Ensure proper storage. Always relock the cap on medicine bottles, and keep your medicines in a safe and locked location out of the reach of children and out of sight from friends and visitors. Each year, approximately 50,000 children younger than 6 years old end up in the Emergency Room after accessing medications when caregivers aren’t present, and many people who misuse pain medications obtain them from a friend or relative.
  • Safely dispose of unused or expired medications. Don’t throw your medications in the trash or flush them down the toilet. Discarded medications can be easily retrieved and abused or illegally sold, and medicines flushed down the toilet can contaminate the community water supply. Safely disposing of your unused and expired medications can help prevent accidental poisoning, overdose, and abuse, and promotes a healthy environment for your family and neighbors.

If you would like more information on prescription drug abuse, visit www.DEA.gov, www.GetSmartAboutDrugs.com and www.JustThinkTwice.com.

If you would like more information about safe medication use, visit http://consumermedsafety.org/.

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Obituaries

Eleanor M. Ryan (1938 – 2021)

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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

Eleanor M. Ryan, 83, of Front Royal, Virginia, passed away on Tuesday, October 19, 2021, at the Lynn Care Center.

A graveside service will be held on Sunday, October 24 at 2:00 p.m. at Willis Chapel Cemetery with Sammy Campbell officiating.

Eleanor was born April 4, 1938, in Chester Gap, Virginia, the daughter of the late Dudley and Julia Pullen.

Surviving is a son, Chris Ryan of Marshall; five sisters, Ruby Reid of Culpeper, Ellsie Wines and Sue Taylor both of Front Royal, Barbara Morris, and Sandra Pullen both of Chester Gap; one brother, Bradley Pullen of Chester Gap; four grandchildren Lynzee Ryan, Shane Ryan, Kelsey Ryan, and Shyanne Ryan all of Florida; and two great-grandchildren Brantley Hill and Ryland Rudolph both of Florida.

Eleanor was preceded in death by her parents; two sisters, Gracie Himes and Ann Williams; and two brothers, Billy Pullen and Frank Pullen.

Friends and family may call at Maddox Funeral Home on Saturday, October 23 from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.

Condolences may be sent to the family at www.maddoxfuneralhome.com

Arrangements are being handled by Maddox Funeral Home, Front Royal.

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Local Government

Joint Town Planning – Council Meeting kicks off Comprehensive Plan rewrite push

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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

The Front Royal Planning Commission did not consider any new permit proposals this month, and instead met October 20 with the Town Council in a Leadership Forum to hear from the consultant team that will help the Town with a major rewrite of its Comprehensive Plan. The current plan dates from 1998. In that version of the Comprehensive Plan, the Town sought to address the problem of an increasing number of community residents who had to commute to the Washington DC metropolitan area leaving a bedroom community without a strong economic base or community character. The plan also identified the loss of the rural character of the area by residential developments in rural areas or mountain development as slowly robbing town residents of the public values contributed by surrounding farms and natural areas. Many of the themes and emphasis areas in the old plan are even more relevant in 2021.

Summit Design and Engineering, the firm that the town has tapped to provide expertise and staff to conduct the rewrite, provided an overview of the schedule and areas of concentration for the joint session, as they had in a one-on-one meeting with council the previous day. Ann Darby, the Summit Design representative, explained that the Comprehensive Plan is a guiding document that envisions what the future of a community looks like and outlines steps it takes to get there. A particularly important point is that although the plan itself does not have the force of law, it should lead to changes in the official zoning map and the Zoning and Subdivision ordinances that bring legal weight to the adopted guidelines.

Summit Design and Engineering representative Ann Darby, left, and Town Planning Director Lauren Kopishke address the Joint Leadership Forum of the Town Council and Planning Commission under questioning from Commission members.

Town Planning Director Lauren Kopishke outlined the results of a Town Council session held on October 19 where council members identified their vision for the town. That vision included:

  • An abundance of retail options
  • A walkable community
  • Riverfront Development and Access
  • Preserve and enhance Downtown
  • Natural Resources
  • Small town charm and architecture
  • Community Appearance
  • Lodging Options
  • Public Transit options
  • Small area planning for key areas.

During the October 19 meeting, Council also identified areas that the members felt should be revisited during the Comprehensive Plan rewrite:

  • A Road Diet, described as a review of the roadways in the town and how they can be made appropriate to the traffic levels
  • Expansion of the entrance corridors
  • Minimization of trip time for basic necessities
  • Location of Industrial Zoning
  • Desirable vs. undesirable uses
  • Traffic Concerns
    • Congestion
    • Bike/Pedestrian safety
    • Public Transport expansion

The vision and goals identified during the process of rewriting the Comprehensive Plan are really only the beginning of the process. A useful Comprehensive Plan is the product of, not only the team assembled by the Town with participation of a consultant, council itself, and the Planning Commission, but the largest and most challenging part – public participation.

The traditional permit process used for individual projects or permit requests includes advertisements in the neighborhoods affected by the granting of a use permit, public hearings, and council approval, but it was noted the Comprehensive Plan needs much more. To properly address the small-town character, economic, environmental, and housing sustainability, tourism, mobility and accessibility, public health and safety, responsive and accountable governance, and public services, the plan needs input from citizens, businesses, and even visitors, in addition to the planning experts and government staff. The Town Planning Department will be reaching out to the public with a variety of tools to gather public input. The team will use public input sessions, an interactive website, online and paper surveys, comment sessions for draft documents, and vision statements to reach the widest population of those citizens, business owners, and visitors who will be impacted by the decisions made in the review and rewrite.

Because the plan must be grounded in current reality, the team intends to spend the initial months of the process gathering information on existing conditions. It must take account of what is working, and not working, Darby said. The plan will be ultimately organized around 11 general areas:

  • Community Appearance
  • Transportation
  • Land Use
  • Economic Development
  • Capital Improvements
  • Tourism
  • Housing
  • Parks & Open Space, Development Areas
  • Goals, Vision, and Future

The benefits of both the Comprehensive Plan and the ensuing Subdivision and Zoning Ordinances are for both citizens and businesses – Companies want to locate in places where their employees would want to live, and citizens want an active local economy for employment and supply for their everyday needs. A good plan builds realistic expectations, better transparency, and a healthier community. Work is expected to continue on the Comprehensive Plan into February of 2023.

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EDA in Focus

‘Ghosts of EDA Loans Past’ come back to haunt county supervisors

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on

When:
June 22, 2020 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
2020-06-22T10:00:00-04:00
2020-06-22T13:00:00-04:00
Where:
Warren County Extension Office
220 North Commerce Avenue
Suite 500
Front Royal VA 22630
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Warren County Extension Office
540-635-4549

The most interesting part of Tuesday evening’s Warren County Board of Supervisors meeting was likely behind closed doors after the board adjourned to Closed/Executive Session for a legal-based answer to North River Supervisor Delores Oates question as to what benefit to the County and its taxpayers there was in approval of a Resolution admitting a “moral obligation” to continue to pay the debt service on bank loans made by the EDA during its developing financial scandal, circa 2016 or so. There was one of three loans at issue of particular interest – the $10-million-dollar loan to Truc “Curt” Tran’s ITFederal company poised to jumpstart commercial redevelopment at the 149-acre portion of the former Avtex Superfund site known as the Royal Phoenix Business Park.

North River Supervisor Delores Oates particularly wondered why it remains in the County’s interest to continue covering debt service on the Town/EDA-sponsored ITFederal loan. Anxious to see commercial redevelopment begin on a portion of the former Avtex Superfund site in town, the Front Royal Town Council made a one-month, which grew to three-months, ‘bridge loan’ of $10-million to the ITFederal project to illustrate Town support of that project to a skeptical bank targeted to finance the project. Below, five-plus years later an unoccupied, un-permitted building constructed at an estimated cost of $2 million or less memorializes the entire debacle. Further below, I guess the building looks kind of like what ITFederal presented back in 2016 – at least the first floor. Royal Examiner Photos by Roger Bianchini

Of particular interest, because the “moral obligation” for that loan was initially believed covered by the Town of Front Royal, whose elected officials agreed to provide a $10-million-dollar “bridge loan” requested by then EDA Executive Director Jennifer McDonald to indicate to First Bank and Trust that “the community” stood behind the loan and proposed project it supported. That request for and Town show of financial support for the ITFed project came despite the fact the company showed virtually no assets other than the three acres at the Royal Phoenix/Avtex site valued at slightly over $2-million-dollars that was “gifted” to the company by the EDA behind closed doors for one dollar.

A clue to what the county supervisors heard over about 15 minutes in Closed Session may have been offered by the board’s action out of it. After some hesitancy in response to the Chair’s call for a motion on the Resolution, Oates’ motion for approval of the “EDA First Bank and Trust Support Agreement”, seconded by Walt Mabe, passed by a unanimous roll call vote. The vote commits the County to continue to absorb those “moral obligation” payments through the Fiscal Year 2021-22 at an estimated cost of $214,000.

In open session, responding to questions about the Resolution in support of the “EDA First Bank and Trust Support Agreement”, County Administrator Ed Daley mentioned consolidation of three loans, including the above-mentioned ITFederal loan (at $9,551,500), as well as a First Bank and Trust Line of Credit ($8,691,600), and a First Bank of Strasburg loan ($3,450,000). Contacted later, Daley cited one condition that would bring the EDA’s payments to the bank on the ITFederal loan in line with what ITFederal pays the EDA monthly at about $42,000. Before the EDA payments fluctuated to more or less than the ITFed payments, sometimes as much as $7,000 a month more.

After County Administrator Ed Daley, left, summarized the proposed ‘First Bank and Trust Support Agreement’ and Supervisor Oates asked ‘Why?’ the County should continue to assume moral obligation payments it may not be responsible for, Interim County Attorney Jason Ham, right, suggested a Closed Session might be most appropriate to answer that question.

Despite the commitment to an estimated $214,000 in payments through this fiscal year, the board’s unanimous vote in support of its moral obligation payments likely reflects negative consequences were the County to bail on covering an EDA debt mid-fiscal year. But again, the agreement is only to the end of the current fiscal year, June 30, 2022. What might the future of “moral obligations” related to the “Ghost of EDA Loans Past” bring in FY-2022-23? – Stay tuned for another seasonal episode of “A Front Royal-Warren County EDA Carol”.

Thermal Shelter bathrooms

County Administrator Daley was also prominent in responding to another matter raised by three speakers during Public Comments about things, not on the meeting agenda. That was the elimination of two bathrooms in the Health and Human Services Complex at the old 15th Street middle school utilized by the County and involved churches and civic organizations to house the community’s homeless indoors at night during the winter. Opening that discussion was First Baptist Church Pastor Christy McMillin-Goodwin, followed by Aneita Bryant and Jim Bunce.

First Baptist Church Pastor Christy McMillin-Goodwin opened Public Comments discussion of how communications broke down between involved Thermal Shelter parties on the removal and delayed replacement of indoor bathrooms nearest the winter homeless shelter.

That trio said an alternate plan for mobile outdoor restrooms was unadvisable due to security and additional personnel to monitor out-of-building night trips, as well as potential severe weather issues. Noting a replacement plan that would not have new indoor facilities in place in time for this winter’s thermal shelter setup, these speakers wondered how the removal plan had been initiated without notice to those involved in helping the County operate the thermal shelter. Bryant suggested allowing access to the next closest indoor facilities.

In responding, Daley said he had been at point for the County in initiating the bathroom removal due to failing pipes that caused toilet backup issues. He said he had envisioned a much quicker turnaround in replacing the removed indoor facilities in that section of the building than ended up being the case. He promised to work proactively with those involved to see that an adequate alternate overnight option was available when the thermal shelter opens as winter arrives.

Public Hearings

Also Tuesday following public hearings, the board unanimously approved three Conditional Use Permit applications, two for short-term tourist rentals and one for a private use campground. Following application summaries by Planning Department Deputy Director Matt Wendling the first two CUP applications, Charles and Lou Ann Dotson’s for the Private Use Campground on their property on Burma Road in the Man-Da-Lay Subdivision; and Jacob W. Lott Jr. and Sandra J. Kiepfer for a short-term tourist rental on their 1.6-acre lot on Little Indian Road in the Blue Mountain Subdivision in Linden went to a vote with no public hearing speakers. Wendling did note that a letter from the chairman of the Blue Mountain Property Owners Association had been received, expressing “no problem” with Lott and Kiepfer’s short-term tourist rental application.

Up last were Nicole and Sean McMinn with a short-term tourist rental permit application for their 2.42-acre property on Sagar Drive in the Highland Estates Subdivision in the Fork District. Again, there were no public speakers after the applicants responded to the board chair’s offer to summarize their request. The D.C.-based couple told the board they had run into little opposition from neighbors, and what opposition there had been from neighbors was not from those closest, but with property over a thousand feet from theirs.

Nicole McMinn and her husband Sean marshaled neighbor and tourism-related business support for their short-term tourist rental permit application.

And while there were no public speakers, the McMinns noted a number of letters to the board from supporters of their short-term tourist rental CUP application, which they asked to be read into the meeting record. Board Clerk Emily Ciarrocchi then read nine letters of support, including one with “25 to 30” signatures. Several of the letters, including one from the owner of the Downriver Canoe Company, noted positive impacts on tourism-related businesses from short-term renters. One letter noted, “They come; they spend; they leave”.

The board then made its final unanimous vote of approval on a motion by Archie Fox in whose district the applicant’s property lies, seconded by Walt Mabe.

Following that vote, Happy Creek Supervisor Tony Carter noted a “Bless you” included in one of the letters read by the clerk that was well-timed to a sneeze by someone present in the government center meeting room.

Approaching an election he chose not to be a part of two days after Halloween this year, Tony Carter was on a comic roll Tuesday evening suggesting politician as perhaps the scariest costume for the Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 window.

In fact, facing a future out of the public eye politically – Carter did not file to be on the ballot for reelection to his Happy Creek seat in November – Carter appeared at times Tuesday to be auditioning for Comedy Club spots during his member report and at various other times during the meeting. In fact, his coming local election, Halloween costume advice during his member report led three of his four colleagues to decline to try and “follow that act”.

See all the fun, business, and other public perspectives, including opening Public Comments speaker Michael Williams question as to whether a recent church-sponsored candidates forum in which the moderator was shown prior to the forum to have contributed to one church-associated candidate’s campaign could threaten that church’s tax-exempt status on U.S. Constitutional separation of church and state guidelines, in the County video:

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
61°
Mostly Cloudy
7:29am6:24pm EDT
Feels like: 61°F
Wind: 3mph W
Humidity: 74%
Pressure: 29.91"Hg
UV index: 0
SatSunMon
63/46°F
70/55°F
73/55°F

Upcoming Events

Oct
23
Sat
11:00 am Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 23 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area.  During Fall Farm Days History Weekend, step back in time and see history come to life. Stroll through the Historic Area buildings, interact with our living historians and discover our links to historic[...]
11:00 am The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 23 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Blacksmith Shop in the Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and[...]
1:00 pm Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
This is a painting class for children 8 years old and up. Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at Strokes of Creativity. Date: Saturday, October 23,[...]
Oct
24
Sun
11:00 am Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 24 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area.  During Fall Farm Days History Weekend, step back in time and see history come to life. Stroll through the Historic Area buildings, interact with our living historians and discover our links to historic[...]
11:00 am The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 24 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Blacksmith Shop in the Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and[...]
6:30 pm Benefit Concert for Front Royal ... @ Riverton Church
Benefit Concert for Front Royal ... @ Riverton Church
Oct 24 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Benefit Concert for Front Royal Police @ Riverton Church
Riverton Church is hosting a benefit concert featuring the Mr. Ron Dye (director) and the Riverton Church Symphonic Wind Orchestra as well as Yesterday Swing Orchestra. Free Admission: Offering taken to benefit the Front Royal[...]
Oct
25
Mon
11:00 am Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 25 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Kindergarten and First Grade. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: Ages 5 and 6 Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at Strokes[...]
1:00 pm Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 25 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Grades 2nd and 3rd. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: 7 and 8 years old Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at[...]
Oct
28
Thu
10:00 am Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie at Strokes of Creativity. Tickets: CLICK HERE Cost: $80 for 6 weeks Dates: Thursdays – Oct 21, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18, Dec 4 Time: 10 am[...]
1:00 pm Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 28 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Grades 4th and 5th. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: 9 and 10 years old Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at[...]