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Botanical Drawing 1

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When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

Learn and practice the art of botanical drawing in pencil with local artist and instructor Elena Maza.

Tuesdays: 1:30pm – 4:00pm, July 9th – 30th. Classes will be held in our upstairs studio at 205 E. Main St., Front Royal, Virginia.

This four week course will focus on learning basic drawing skills as applied to botanicals: basic line drawings of leaves, flowers, the different types, shapes, composition and layout, etc. from live plant materials. Students will take their drawings of sprigs of flowers and/or leaves and learn how to use shading techniques to create the illusion of three dimensions and depth.

Materials are not included. Recommended supplies listed on our website.


Class policies: We understand that scheduling conflicts do happen. You may cancel your class for a full refund up to 48 hours before the first class, by phone or in person. No refunds will be issued after this time.

In case of inclement weather, we will reschedule the class. Please check our Facebook page for updates on class cancellations due to weather.

Regional News

Judicial Watch sues Virginia County over secret Democrat Officials’ meeting on police response to BLM riot

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When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

Judicial Watch announced that it has teamed up with residents of Prince William County, Virginia, and their Virginia law firm, McSweeney, Cynkar & Kachouroff, PLLC to file a lawsuit against members of the Prince William County Board of Supervisors regarding a violation of Virginia’s open meetings law. The lawsuit was filed in Prince William County Circuit Court (Gloss, et al. v. Wheeler, et al. (No. 20-7521)).

On Saturday night May 30, various protests and rioting occurred in Prince William County, resulting in numerous injuries to police officers and extensive property damage. Police officers reportedly used tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd. The next day, a meeting of the police department’s Citizen Advisory Board was held. All five Democrat supervisors attended the meeting, but the board’s three Republican members were not notified of the meeting and did not attend. The individual who chairs the Citizen’s Advisory Board is the husband of one of the Democrat supervisors.

As explained in the lawsuit, the Democrat supervisors violated Virginia’s Freedom of Information Act/open meeting law by holding a meeting in secret, without notice any Republican supervisor nor advance notice to the public as required by law. Virginia law prohibits any gathering of two or more members of the same public body if public business is transacted or discussed. While no votes were cast during the meeting, the Democrat members posed questions and provided directives to the police leadership to curtail the use of crowd control measures in future disturbances. As set forth in the lawsuit, this constituted a discussion of public business in violation of Virginia Code section 2.2.-3707(A).

“Now, more than ever, citizens need transparency in their government. Secret meetings on police policy undermines public confidence and violates the law,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton.

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Local News

Town of FR Infuses 1+ Million into Local Businesses through CARES-Deadline Monday August 10th

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When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

WHAT MATTERS Warren–In this video, learn about the Town of Front Royal’s ongoing efforts that are infusing over 1 million dollars into small businesses impacted by the COVID crisis. Niki Foster Cales (of the FR/WC Chamber of Commerce) discusses the FR CARES program’s simple application process and encourages businesses to get their applications in by MONDAY’S 8/10 DEADLINE.  The Chamber is overseeing the program and is proud to partner with the Town of Front Royal to support our valued small business community.


Town of Front Royal is providing financial assistance to small businesses

WHAT MATTERS:
Are you or your group in need of a free video or article that could be created to help market your cause or event?   Or do you have an interesting story to share?  Beth’s WHAT MATTERS Warren videos post on Facebook and Youtube. They are also shared with the Royal Examiner online (most are distributed in their daily email blast to thousands of local residents). Sign up for the Royal Examiner at www.royalexaminer.com and check out the “WHAT MATTERS Warren” tab under “Features.”

Learn more about Beth’s nonprofit,  WHAT MATTERS, a 501 (c) (3), at www.whatmattersw2.com–check out the “Community” section to request a TOWN TIP or WHAT MATTERS WARREN BETHvid or contact her at 540-671-6145 or beth@whatmattersw2.com.

About WHAT MATTERS:
WHAT MATTERS is a 501(c)(3) that focuses on local and global outreach to help spread the word, support and raise funds for causes that matter (primarily through Facebook). WHAT MATTERS has ZERO overhead as 100% of the expenses are funded by Beth’s real estate business thanks to her clients and supporters.  Every cent donated goes to the cause.  If you’d like to get involved with her local or international nonprofit work, or travel to Africa with her on a future trip to work with the children of Light up Life Foundations, please visit www.whatmattersw2.com. Be sure to check out the “projects” tab for her current WHAT MATTERS Initiatives.

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What to do if you have a gap in your CV

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When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

There are many legitimate reasons to have a gap in your CV. But whether it was to recover from an illness, travel the world, or take care of your newborn, recruiters are unlikely to ignore the interlude. However, it won’t necessarily prevent you from getting a job. Here’s how to deal with a gap in your CV.

Be subtle
Avoid justifying an employment gap on your CV. The only reason to call attention to one is if doing so allows you to highlight relevant skills acquired during that time, such as through volunteer work. Remember, you have limited space to outline your qualifications on a CV so pertinent job experience should take priority.

Be honest

Never modify the start and end dates of your employment to eliminate a gap. However, if you were absent from the workforce for just a few months, you can choose to only indicate the years during which you held each position. Preferably, you should draw attention away from any gaps by making sure your CV thoroughly demonstrates your qualifications, skills, and attributes.

Be positive
Eventually, you’ll have to justify why there’s a gap in your CV. Make sure your explanation puts the situation in a good light. Emphasize that it was an opportunity for personal growth and assert that it won’t hinder your ability to carry out future responsibilities.

If you think an absence from the workforce will severely affect your candidacy, you can briefly justify it in a cover letter. Otherwise, wait to discuss it during an interview since it’ll likely be easier to explain in person.

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Local News

Town Talk: A conversation with Dr. Chris Ballenger, Superintendent, Warren County Schools

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on

When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

In this Town Talk, we’ll have a conversation with Dr. Chris Ballenger. Dr. Ballenger joined the Warren County School System on July 1, 2020. One of his first challenges was the two high-school graduations, which were a great success and well-received by both parents and students. This success he credits the hard work of his team of staff and teachers who made it happen.

In this conversation with our publisher Mike McCool, Dr. Ballenger outlines the plan for re-opening our schools and addresses some concerns of parents. He said, “As you can imagine, a tremendous amount of thought and planning has gone into the reopening plan for our students.  We have progressed through the development of our plan with guidance from the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) and the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE).” He went on, “It is possible that adjustments will be made to our plan as we receive new information and guidance as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve.  This year will require the entire school community to be flexible and patient as the school year progresses.”

The WCPS Reopening and Instructional plan can be found on our website along with the WCPS Health Plan (https://www.wcps.k12.va.us/index.php/parents/wcps-re-opening-options).

Town Talk is a series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders, and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea, topic, or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to news@RoyalExaminer.com


This is an overview of the re-opening plan:

The two instructional delivery choices for families for the start of the 2020-2021 school year are the Hybrid Model and the Full Virtual Model.

Hybrid Model:

Grades PreK-4:  In-person instruction four days per week and one day virtual.  In-person instruction will be supported and reinforced by online learning with students physically in the school buildings four days per week – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.  Virtual instruction will occur on Wednesday for all PreK-4 students.

Grade 5: In-person instruction four days per week and one day virtual.  In-person instruction will be supported and reinforced by online learning with students physically in the school buildings four days per week–Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.  Virtual instruction will occur on Wednesday for all fifth-grade students.

Fifth-grade students at E. Wilson Morrison, Hilda J. Barbour, and Leslie Fox Keyser Elementary Schools will report for in-person instruction at identified middle school buildings.  Fifth-grade students at A. S. Rhodes and Ressie Jeffries Elementary Schools will continue at their own elementary schools.  Classes will be taught by elementary teachers from their home schools.

Grades 6-12:  Students will attend in-person instruction one day per week and work remotely four days per week.  A flipped classroom model will be used where students use online instructional resources that have been assigned through the classroom learning management system.  In a flipped classroom model, students use online instructional resources that have been assigned through a learning management system.  Teachers support online learning with face-to-face instruction.  The face-to-face time is structured to include activities, practice with feedback, and collaborative tasks or projects

Teachers will support online learning with in-person instruction one day per week utilizing an A or B day schedule that is structured to include activities, practice with feedback, and collaborative tasks and projects.

Teachers will provide virtual lessons to students that are working remotely on a daily basis.  Students are encouraged to attend the virtual lesson every day that a student is not being provided with in-person instruction.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
PreK-5 PreK-5 Remote Learning for All Students PreK-5 PreK-5
WCMS A Day WCMS B Day Remote Learning for All Students SMS A Day SMS B Day
WCHS A Day WCHS B Day Remote Learning for All Students SHS A Day SHS B Day

Full Virtual Model:

Students will participate in full-time remote learning, including both interactive, teacher-led live instruction and independent learning tasks.  Families interested in registering their child for full-time remote learning must contact their child’s school by Tuesday, August 18, 2020, to select the virtual model.

  • This virtual option is available to all students in grades pre-kindergarten through 12.
  • Students will be assigned to a WCPS teacher and receive a learning device that will enable students to access the division’s learning management systems.
  • Teachers will provide daily instruction via a learning management system so that students are provided quality instruction.
  • Teachers will also assign daily/weekly lessons through the learning management system and support students through in-person and virtual meetings.

School Schedules:

Daily Schedule for E. Wilson Morrison, Leslie Fox Keyser, and Ressie Jeffries

8:00 A.M.                    School day begins

1:30 P.M.                    School day ends

Daily Schedule for Hilda J. Barbour and A. S. Rhodes

9:00 A.M.                    School begins

2:30 P.M.                    School day ends

Middle and High School Schedules

9:00 A.M.                    School day begins

3:05 P.M.                    School day ends

High School Schedule for 2020-2021

For the 2020-2021 school year, we are going to utilize a 6 period day for the entire school year.  As we begin the year classes will be broken into two sections.   Each school will have two in-person instruction days, each section will be assigned one in-person day.  As soon as it is safe the two sections will be combined to create one in-person class that will meet together for the remainder of the year.    This change was made to make the best use of limited in-person time and to create an opportunity for daily instruction.

Mitigation Strategies – Minimizing Exposure

  • Designate six feet of spacing between desks and student seating
  • Reduce the number of students assigned to each classroom
  • Increase circulation of outside air, where possible
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces as much as possible
  • Deep clean and disinfect entire school on Wednesdays
  • Monitor arrival and dismissal of students to discourage congregate settings
  • Ensure students report directly to classrooms and designated areas
  • Designate, where possible, hallways and stairwells as one-way
  • Check the temperature of students daily as they enter school
  • Require daily health checks performed by the parent prior to coming to school
  • Require staff and students to wear face coverings at all times at the middle and high schools
  • Encourage staff and students at the elementary schools to wear face coverings while in school. Staff and students will be required to wear face coverings when physical distancing is not attainable.
  • Require frequent hand washing and utilization of hand sanitizer for all students
  • Provide hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes for all classrooms
  • Ensure students have their own learning materials and supplies
  • Reduce class interactions and hallway traffic, group gatherings and movement throughout buildings
  • Minimize exposure to other students by keeping the same groups as much as possible
  • Install water bottle filling stations are being installed in all schools
  • Limit access to schools to essential personnel and students. Parent conferences will be by appointment only. Visitors will be required to wear face coverings and submit to temperature checks.
  • Increase virtual field trips and cancel in-person field trips and assemblies to ensure there are no large gathering of students
  • Provide breakfast and lunch to elementary and middle school students in their classrooms

Transportation

  • Face coverings are required for students to ride the bus
  • The spacing of passengers, personal safety materials for operators and passengers with coverings being required of both, frequent cleaning and disinfection of buses
  • Parents/guardians are asked to not send their child(ren) to their bus stop if he/she has a fever, a cough, or shortness of breath or feels ill. This will lessen the chances of an entire bus load of children and bus driver being put at risk
  • Parents/guardians are asked to speak to their children about social distancing at bus stops. If possible, students remain in their parents’ cars until the bus arrives at the bus stop
  • When the bus arrives at the bus stop, students are to enter one at a time
  • Load to back of the bus first; unload front of the bus first
  • At schools, unload and load one bus at a time
  • Each bus will have a seating arrangement; students will sit in the same seat daily
  • There may be no more than 1 student per seat; if students are siblings or live in the same household, they may sit three to a seat
  • Students are not allowed to ride a bus home with a friend or make last-minute bus changes until further notice due to capacity rules on school buses. If riding a different bus in the afternoon than in the morning is part of a student’s regular schedule, for example riding to a caregiver’s house on a daily basis, would be allowed if there is sufficient space on the bus. This plan must be approved with the school’s principal and the Transportation Director at the beginning of the school year
  • If a bus driver suspects a student is sick when he/she enters the bus, the school will notify the parent if not at the bus stop. If the parent cannot be reached, the student will be given a face covering and socially distanced in his/her own seat at the front of the bus. The principal of the school will be notified that a possibly ill student is on the bus.  The principal and/or staff will meet the bus when it arrives at the school in order to care for any sick child
  • Buses will be sanitized after each run and at the end of the day
  • Any route changes will be communicated to parents through the school messaging system

Child Nutrition

  • All staff will wear face coverings and gloves during food preparation and service.
  • Grab and go breakfasts will be available at elementary, middle, and high school so students can go directly to their classroom on arrival.
  • At elementary and middle school, lunch will be served in the classroom with a teacher present.
  • Bagged lunches may be brought from home. No drop-offs of food items. If a student forgets lunch, they will be provided a school lunch for the day.
  • Visitors will not be permitted in school cafeterias.
  • Students participating in virtual learning will have the option to pick up 5-day meal packs once a week.

Technology

PreK – 2nd Grade:
Email applications will not be accessible by students.  Accounts will be created for Classroom and LMS accounts only.

Grades 3 – 8:
Email applications will be set to work within our WCPS domain only.  Incoming emails from sources outside of the school system’s domain will be blocked to the student’s email account.

Grades 9 – 12:
Email applications will be open for outside communication with restrictions on threats as monitored by SysCloud.

Connectivity:

Students will require high-speed internet access for virtual learning.  We recommend at least a home internet to be at least 5 Mbps per student.  If parents do not have access to high-speed internet at their homes the following options are available:

  • Available internet options:  Please check the internet options for your area.  WCPS keeps a detailed list of currently available internet services in our area.  WCPS will update this information as new services are available.
  • Wifi hotspots:  These will be available at the school library for check out.  Please note, they will not work in every area of the county.  If this option does not work, please return your hotspot to your school library.
  • Drive up hotspots.  WCPS is working on adding new hotspots in areas that have poor internet access.

Technology Support:

Parents may require tech support for virtual learning.  The technology department will provide support for parents regarding Chromebooks, login information, and any other school related technology needs.  These supports will include:

  • Documentation:  These may include directions on how to login into accounts, common troubleshooting tips, and standard WCPS technology practices.
  • Help Desk:  This may include contact information through web, email, and phone, support hours during both business hours and after hours.  If a tech needs to handle a device we will provide a drop off location for parents to leave the device with us for repair or device exchange.

Grading

All students will be required to complete work assignments and participate in class activities, regardless of hybrid or distance learning choice.

Teachers must be mindful of the transition back to school and the likely instructional gap/loss students may have. Varied instruction and opportunities for attaining the content must be presented for struggling learners and accelerated learners.

Participation and Attendance

Participation in school, no matter the mode of instruction, is required. Participation and attendance will be monitored.

  •   Full Virtual Model:
  • After 5 days of no interaction, school administration will attempt to make contact with the parent/guardian and develop a plan to address the issue
  • After 10 days of no interaction, school administration will refer the student to the Warren County Schools Truancy Officer
  •   Hybrid Learning:
  • After 5 unexcused absences, school administration will attempt to make contact with the parent/guardian and develop a plan to address the issue
  • After 10 unexcused absences, school administration will refer the student to the Warren County Schools Truancy Officer

Tracking Student Attendance in Various Instructional Delivery Models 

In-Person Remote – Online Remote – Other
Time-based Physical presence during the scheduled instructional day · Virtual presence for a synchronous online lesson

· Login time to a learning management system

· Activity log on a learning management system

· Total time log on a learning management system

· Phone call or real-time online chat

· Time-stamp for posts or submissions

· Submission of a time log

· Phone call

· Face-to-face meeting (may be an option for divisions have students come in for packet or work collection/drop-off)

Task-or Product- based Participation in classes/ submission of coursework · Participation in a synchronous online lesson

· Demonstrated evidence of engagement with peers for collaborative work

· Engagement on a discussion board

· Email exchange

· Phone call

· Submission of task or assignment

· “View” tracker for asynchronous online lesson

· Submission of task, product, or assignment

 Summary

This educational plan for Warren County Public Schools is designed with commitments to a high-quality educational experience while maintaining a safe learning and work environment for our students and staff.  Extensive work has been completed after the release of the Virginia Department of Education “Recovery, Redesign, and Restart” document.   This document provides key components and considerations for our reopening plan.   Please note that our plan may be altered due to evolving conditions and recommendations.

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Virginia Supreme Court grants temporary statewide eviction moratorium

Published

on

When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

Governor Ralph Northam today, August 7, 2020, announced a temporary statewide moratorium on eviction proceedings in Virginia. The moratorium, which will begin on Monday, August 10, and remains in effect through Monday, September 7, halts all eviction proceedings related to failure to pay rent. Governor Northam requested this moratorium in a letter to Virginia Supreme Court Chief Justice Donald Lemons on July 24.

“Today’s decision comes at a time when we are still battling this public health crisis and need all Virginians to maintain safe, stable housing,” said Governor Northam. “As the ongoing Congressional stalemate leaves hundreds of thousands of Virginians without federal housing protection or unemployment relief, this is a critical step towards keeping families safe in their homes. I am grateful to the Virginia Supreme Court for granting this order, and I look forward to working with the General Assembly this month to develop more permanent legislative protections for Virginia homeowners and tenants.”

On June 29, Governor Northam launched the Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program (RMRP), which provides an initial $50 million in federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding for Virginia households facing eviction and foreclosure due to COVID-19. Eligibility and application information for the RMRP is available here.

Tenants are encouraged to know their rights and responsibilities and pay their rent on time if they are able. Please visit StayHomeVirginia.com for additional information and resources on tenant rights.

Governor Northam’s letter to Chief Justice Lemons requesting this moratorium is available here. Today’s order from the Virginia Supreme Court can be found here.

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Front Royal and Warren County first responders conduct mass casualty incident training at Christendom College

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on

When:
July 23, 2019 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
2019-07-23T13:30:00-04:00
2019-07-23T16:00:00-04:00
Where:
Art in the Valley
205-A East Main St | Front Royal
VA 22630
Cost:
$140
Contact:
Kelli Hart
540-252-2260

Personnel from Warren County Emergency Management, Warren County Sheriff’s Office, Warren County Fire & Rescue, and the Front Royal Police Department came together for three days of Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) training at Christendom College this week, taking an extensive review of what resources are in place for such an incident and how first responders can align their
operational responses to major incidents within the Town of Front Royal and Warren County.

“Preparing for this type of crisis is essential in the times that we find ourselves in,” said Front Royal Chief of Police Kahle Magalis. “We certainly hope that this type of training is never brought to bear, but the reality is that we must be ready if we ever have to deal with it. This is the first step.”

The training is the latest in a series of exercises that were conducted in the past year on separate key areas of responding to a major incident. An emphasis was placed on not only field operations at the patrol level, but also in Incident Command with a heavy emphasis on field supervisors understanding their roles in managing a critical incident involving multiple agencies. The exercises were developed to test the capabilities of neutralizing a threat, quickly addressing critically injured victims, incident management, and effective notification to additional resources.

Christendom College graciously allowed the use of their facilities to test these capabilities of area public safety agencies, while also integrating and testing their own facility’s emergency plans during the training exercises.

“It is crucial to be prepared for a crisis of this magnitude,” said Mark Rohlena, Executive Vice President of Christendom College. “While we pray we never have to implement our emergency plans, it is necessary to know that we are prepared in case such a situation ever occurs. We are grateful to the personnel of the Front Royal Police Department, the Warren County Sherriff’s Office, Warren County Fire & Rescue, and Warren County Emergency Management for their cooperation and assistance during these training exercises on campus.”

This week’s training resulted in a culmination of everything local first responder agencies learned this past year and put into practice. Responding to the scene of an emergency is never an easy task, but this training has better prepared the agencies as a result of these training exercises.

“These types of events simply cannot be managed by a single agency. I am very appreciative of the support from our local public safety partners and Christendom College in bringing this training exercise to fruition,” concluded Deputy Emergency Coordinator Rick Farrall.

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Front Royal
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