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Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal.

  • Every Wednesday evening
  • Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m.
  • Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m.
  • Food and refreshments available
  • More Info on Facebook

Community Events

Ride for a Reason: Winchester Community Revs Up Support for Evans Home for Kids

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

Skyline Harley-Davidson Hosts Festive Fundraiser with Shenandoah Valley Christian Riders.

As the festive season approaches, the spirit of giving is revving up in Winchester, Virginia. The Henry and William Evans Home for Children has teamed up with the Shenandoah Valley Christian Riders (SVCR) for a unique Christmas fundraising event. Dubbed the “Christmas Fund Ride,” this event invites motorcycle enthusiasts and community members to hit the road for a noble cause: bringing holiday cheer to children in need.

Set against the scenic Shenandoah Valley backdrop, the event will kick off at the iconic Skyline Harley-Davidson, located at 140 Independence Road, Winchester. Registration begins at 2:00 p.m. on December 10, 2023, with engines starting at 2:15 p.m. In case of rain, the event has a backup date set for December 17, ensuring that the ride will go on, come rain or shine.

Leading the pack will be members of the SVCR, a local chapter of the Christian Motorcyclists Association, known for their commitment to community service and love for the open road. Participants are encouraged to contribute $20 per rider or non-motorcycle vehicle and $10 for each motorcycle passenger. These donations will go directly towards purchasing Christmas gifts for the children residing at the Evans Home, making the holiday season brighter for those who need it most.

Mitch Berkenkemper, the President of SVCR, is the go-to person for more information about the ride. He can be reached at berke777@hotmail.com or via phone at 540/520-0330. His enthusiasm for the event is infectious, as he calls on the community to show their support not just as riders but as benefactors of a heartfelt cause.

This Christmas Fund Ride is more than just a motorcycle event; it’s a testament to the power of community spirit and the joy of giving. As the engines roar to life on December 10, it won’t just be about the thrill of the ride but the collective effort to make a difference in the lives of children. In the true spirit of the holiday season, the Winchester community is invited to come together, ride, and spread joy where it’s needed most.

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Opinion

Front Royal Shines Bright: A Heartfelt Thanks for a Magical Christmas on Main

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

I’d like to extend a giant THANK YOU to everyone involved in making Christmas on Main – Christmas Parade & Merry Market such a HUGE success.

To our volunteers who helped get everything set up, assisted vendors ushered the carriage rides, made sure the parade entries were lined up, and helped to ensure a great day for everyone: you are appreciated, and these events can’t happen without you!

To our friends at the Town of Front Royal Public Works and Energy Services staff who blocked streets, cleared parking lots, picked up trash, made sure the electricity was working, and so much more: you are the best, and your efforts do not go unnoticed. To the Officers at the Front Royal Police Department who worked tirelessly to keep everyone safe during the day’s events: your vigilance and professionalism are outstanding. I’d also like to acknowledge the hard work of Lizi Lewis, Manager of Community Development & Tourism, and her team at the Visitor Center. They are always helpful, insightful, and great to work with on events and projects.

To our vendors and parade participants: You knocked it out of the park this year! I was in awe of the artistry and magic in your creations. You made us all feel like we were in a Hallmark movie.

To our merchants and residents downtown: thank you for your patience and for sharing our beautiful downtown with everyone.

Last but certainly not least, to our community: Thank you for showing up. It was truly amazing to look out and see such a remarkable crowd. I hope the event made your heart as happy as it made mine and that you created memories to enjoy for a lifetime.

There is quite a bit of time and effort that goes into planning events like these. At the Chamber, we are already looking forward to next year and thinking about how we can make this event even more enjoyable for everyone. We’re always open to hearing your thoughts and suggestions. Please reach out if you have something to share.

I wish you and yours a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year!

All the best,

Niki Foster, President
Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

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Automotive

Gear Up for Winter: Essential Car Accessories for the Cold Season

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

Four Must-Have Accessories to Navigate Winter Roads Safely.

Preparing your car for the season’s challenges is crucial as winter approaches. Equipping your vehicle with the right accessories can significantly ensure safety and comfort during the cold months. Here are four essential car accessories that are must-haves for the winter season.

  1. Snow Brush and Ice Scraper: A robust snow brush is indispensable for clearing snow off your car. A telescopic model with an integrated ice scraper is particularly useful. Opt for EVA foam or silicone scrapers to avoid scratching your car’s windows and paint. These materials are gentle yet effective in removing ice and snow.
  2. High-Quality Windshield Wipers: Visibility is key during winter drives, especially in snowstorms or on slush-covered roads. Investing in high-quality windshield wipers is crucial. Look for durable models with an extra rubber coating and a strong internal frame designed to withstand harsh winter conditions.
  3. Rubber Floor Mats: Winter road conditions can bring a lot of slush and moisture into your vehicle. Heavy-duty rubber floor mats with deep grooves are perfect for protecting your car’s interior and the electronic components beneath the front seats. Plus, they keep your footwear clean.
  4. Lightweight Shovel: A compact, lightweight shovel with an extendable handle is an invaluable tool if your car, or another’s, gets stuck in the snow. It’s much more efficient and safer than using hands or feet for digging.

Emergency Kit: In addition to these accessories, it’s wise to carry an emergency kit in your vehicle. This kit should include essentials like warm clothing, bottled water, a flashlight, and traction aids to handle unexpected situations.

Preparing your car for winter doesn’t just enhance your driving experience; it also plays a crucial role in ensuring your safety. By equipping your vehicle with these essential accessories, you’re not just preparing for the cold; you’re ensuring peace of mind. As the temperature drops, remember that a well-prepared car is the key to navigating winter roads safely and comfortably.

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State News

This Land is Our Land: States Crack Down on Foreign-Owned Farm Fields

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

Andy Gipson gets concerned even when American allies such as the Netherlands and Germany invest in large swaths of Mississippi’s farmland.

“It just bothers me at a gut level,” he said.

For Gipson, Mississippi’s commissioner of agriculture and commerce, the growing trend of foreign ownership could threaten what he views as the state’s most valuable asset: the land that grows its forests, rice, and cotton.

“It is our ability as a country, as a state to produce our own food, our own fiber, and our own shelter,” he told Stateline. “And I think every acre that’s sold to anybody outside of this country is one less acre that we have to rely on for our own self-interest, our own national food security.”

Gipson has spent recent months studying the growing amount of his state’s farmland being bought up by foreign interests. He chaired a study committee that just issued a 363-page report on the issue requested by the legislature after a lawmaker had offered a bill to ban foreign purchases completely.

Since its constitution was approved in 1890, the state has had provisions restricting land ownership by “nonresident aliens,” the report noted. But the committee concluded current state law “lacks a clear, workable enforcement mechanism.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that foreign interests held some 757,000 acres of Mississippi’s agricultural land, about 2.5% of the total. Gipson hopes the Republican-led legislature will stiffen the law in the upcoming session.

“I think the time is going to be right in 2024 for the legislature to tighten these laws up,” he said.

If the legislature acts, Mississippi will join a growing group of states seeking to ban or further restrict foreign ownership of farmland. Lawmakers are targeting nations considered hostile to U.S. interests, such as China and Russia, and looking for new enforcement measures. Many see Arkansas as leading the latter push; officials there invoked a new law in October that bans certain foreign owners and ordered a Chinese seed company to divest its land.

Nearly half the states have some restrictions on the books, some dating back to the 1700s.

While the debate is as old as the nation itself, the issue has been reinvigorated in recent years after Chinese firms purchased land near military installments in North Dakota and in Texas, said Micah Brown, an attorney at the National Agricultural Law Center at the University of Arkansas who tracks the issue.

Brown said lawmakers in 36 states proposed some sort of legislation on the issue this year, ranging from caps to bans to targets on certain countries, with measures passing in about a dozen of them. More bills are expected in upcoming sessions.

Some lawmakers and experts warn that such laws could go too far, making it difficult for some farmers to sell their land, discouraging economic development, or even leading to discrimination against certain groups of people, such as Asian Americans.

Foreign ownership of U.S. farmland probed at U.S. Senate hearing

Foreigners held an interest in about 40 million acres of U.S. agricultural land at the end of 2021, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Canadian investors own the largest share of that acreage, followed by investors from the United Kingdom and Europe. Foreign ownership represents only about 3.1% of all privately held U.S. agricultural land. But the number is quickly rising: Foreign ownership has increased more than 50% in the past decade, Brown said.

But USDA data shows Chinese ownership is still relatively rare: Chinese interests own less than 1% of the nation’s foreign-held agricultural acreage.

Federal law currently does not regulate foreign ownership of land beyond requiring foreign buyers to register with the USDA. But there is bipartisan interest in Congress in tighter restrictions and reporting on foreign ownership.

At the state level, much of the legislation has been proposed by Republicans, though Brown said it’s largely enjoyed bipartisan support — particularly when bills target ownership by nations considered hostile to American interests.


“It’d be pretty difficult for someone to step out and say, ‘Hey, I don’t think we should restrict North Korea.’ … That’s kind of where some of the politics come into this. It looks like you’re achieving something. There’s been a lot of bipartisan support on these efforts.”

Arkansas leads on enforcement

In October, Arkansas Republican Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders invoked the war between Israel and Hamas as she announced her state was taking its first action against foreign ownership of agricultural land.

Sanders described America’s “enemies,” naming not just Hamas, but also China, Iran, and Russia as “on the march.”

“Yet for too long in the name of tolerance we’ve let these dangerous governments infiltrate our country,” she said. “Arkansas will tolerate them no longer.”

The state ordered seed and pesticide maker Syngenta to sell 160 acres of land it owns in Northeast Arkansas and uses for research. Legislation passed during the 2023 session barred certain foreign countries from owning farmland and enabled the state to seek judicial foreclosure for those found in violation. The attorney general’s office said it was to date the only known property covered by the new law.

China Owns Little US Farmland, But Many Lawmakers Are Worried

Syngenta, which was given two years to sell its property, did not respond to a Stateline request for comment. The company previously criticized the Arkansas action as “shortsighted.”

Last month, Arkansas Attorney General Tim Griffin, a Republican, announced that Syngenta had paid a $280,000 civil penalty for failing to register with the state as required under legislation passed in 2021.

“This serves as a warning to all other Chinese state-owned companies operating in Arkansas — I am investigating these types of properties throughout the state and will exercise all powers afforded to my office under the law,” he said in a statement last month. 

Based in Switzerland, Syngenta was bought by ChemChina, a state-owned entity, in 2017.

Republican state Sen. Blake Johnson said he was unaware of Syngenta’s acquisition when he sponsored both pieces of legislation. He said the laws were broadly aimed at protecting national security.

“Our food safety is paramount to the national defense, in my opinion: feeding, clothing ourselves and our military if need be in the future,” he said. “That can be done by our own land. We don’t need to outsource that to our enemies.”

Johnson said he was careful to target the legislation at unfriendly nations. It applies to the same countries named in the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, federal rules that restrict weapons from certain adversarial nations. He noted that friendly nations are exempt: Canada, for instance, owns large swaths of timberland in southern Arkansas.

“That’s not a problem under this law,” he said.

The Arkansas action was closely watched by officials in neighboring Mississippi.

“To date, Arkansas is the only state that has actually enforced a law like this,” said Gipson, the Mississippi agriculture commissioner. “I like the way they did it.”

But he said there are plenty of complications.

Mississippi doesn’t want to hinder important agricultural research, Gipson said. Nor does it want to dissuade investments such as Japanese-based Nissan’s giant assembly plant in Canton.

“Some of the states have had unintended consequences, and we don’t want to have those, obviously,” he said.

Republican state Rep. Bill Pigott, who also served on the study committee, said he’s working on legislation he thinks will pass in 2024.

A farmer who raises peanuts, corn, and cattle, Pigott said he has not heard from other farmers about the issue, though he said many constituents are concerned.

“People who listen to the news and watch TV — they seem to be more concerned about it than actually the farmers themselves,” he said. “I do get people ask if we are doing anything.”

Pigott said the legislation will aim to target hostile nations such as China and Russia. Currently, investors from the Netherlands are the largest foreign owners in Mississippi, followed by Germany.

“Almost nobody has any concern with that,” he said. “It is the hostile nations, and No. 1 on that list is China.”

Striking a balance

In opening a U.S. Senate hearing in September, Michigan Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow acknowledged that the nation’s food system is an integral component of national security.

With more foreign entities buying up land, she said, the issue deserves scrutiny. But she offered a warning:

“We must also be cautious of our history of barring immigrants from owning land in our country and ensure efforts to protect our national and economic security do not encourage discrimination,” she said.

During hearings on foreign-owned agricultural land in Topeka, Kansas, state Rep. Rui Xi, a Democrat and the only Chinese American in the state House, in September warned about rhetoric casting suspicion on Asian Americans such as grad students lawfully admitted to the United States.

“If we want to take a look at foreign investment in ag land and it’s narrow, that’s great,” Xi said. “If you try to cast a shadow and it continues to cast suspicion on people who are here innocently, who are just trying to learn, who are trying to attend our universities, I think that’s where we really, really need to urge caution.”

While more American agricultural land is being bought up by foreign interests, it’s generally not governments that own it, said David Ortega, a food economist at Michigan State University. Syngenta garnered plenty of attention in Arkansas, but it’s more common for foreign individuals and firms to buy land as investments, he said.

So far, Ortega said, there’s no evidence that foreign purchases have raised ag prices or pose any threat to American food security.

Ortega said policymakers should consider carefully the potential effects of new laws on the broader agricultural economy. China, for instance, is often targeted by legislators. But it’s also the largest buyer of American agricultural exports and could retaliate against American farmers.

“It’s far easier for China to find a new source to buy [from] than it is for us to find new export markets,” he said in an interview.

Ortega said there are specific, local concerns about foreign ownership worth addressing. And while there are many good-faith debates occurring, he does worry that the conversation could lead to discrimination against groups such as Chinese Americans.

Youngkin halted Ford battery plant efforts in Virginia over concerns about China

“I don’t think that the root cause of lawmakers’ concerns over this issue is rooted in xenophobia,” he said. “But I am worried that the way this issue is talked about can lead to xenophobia and those types of issues. And that’s why I and others are urging caution.”

Since Congress has not enacted any legislation, state lawmakers say they are willing to act.

“While I would prefer we send one message from our Congress to address this issue, that’s beyond the scope of what I can do,” said Georgia state Rep. Clay Pirkle, a Republican. “What I can do is formulate a state response to this issue.”

Pirkle grows cotton, peanuts, rice, and butterbeans on about 1,000 acres in southern Georgia. Earlier this year, he introduced legislation in Atlanta that would prevent nonresident aliens from purchasing farmland near military bases if they were from nations deemed adversarial by the U.S. Department of Commerce — a list that currently includes China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, and Russia. The bill didn’t progress, but Pirkle plans to pursue it again next session.

He said crafting legislation on the matter is complicated because he does not want Georgia to dissuade purchases from people who have fled other countries for the United States.

“I really made every effort to avoid unintentional consequences of folks from these countries that have come to the United States because they really desire liberty and freedom,” he said. “And I wanted to make sure that I did not unduly burden them.”

But Pirkle believes something needs to be done. American agricultural land is not a renewable resource. Developers continue to encroach on farmland for the development of new housing and industry.

“The land that we have that we grow crops on to feed the world is the land that we have in ag production,” he said. “We’re not making any more, and it is a scarce resource.”

 

by Kevin Hardy, Virginia Mercury


Stateline is a sister publication of the Virginia Mercury within States Newsroom, a nonprofit news network supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Stateline maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Scott S. Greenberger for questions: info@stateline.org

Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Local Government

Discussion of Poultry Policy in Urban Agriculture Becomes Impassioned at Town Council Work Session

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

On Monday, December 4, at 7 p.m. in the Front Royal Town Hall at 102 East Main Street, the Front Royal Town Council met for a work session in which they spent a considerable amount of time discussing a proposed ordinance amendment to Town Codes related to poultry policy for Urban Agriculture uses. The discussion had been postponed from council’s regular meeting on September 25. The item was again postponed after an impassioned discussion in which Councilwoman Amber Morris expressed a strong opinion against certain included conditions.

Front Royal Town Council meets for a work session on the evening of December 4 in the Front Royal Town Hall. Royal Examiner Photos Brenden McHugh.

The proposed amendment to Town Code respecting chickens allows for an increase in ownership from six chickens to ten chickens by any residential dweller in possession of a permit, but it may capsize when it comes to a vote because of the regulations that are attached to it. It is these regulations that Morris strongly opposes. They would keep all chickens in coops with a floor space of four square feet for each chicken “and or” – in the language of the amendment – a run space allowing for eight square feet per chicken. “No poultry shall be permitted to run at large,” the amendment reads. Planning Director and Zoning Administrator Lauren Kopishke explained that this “codification” would not be unprecedented, as it reflects the standards by which the Town has operated in the past; it would simply give “teeth” to those prerequisites for owning chickens in residential areas which the Town has historically applied as it inspects, and grants permits. But allowing the chickens to range free in a fenced in area is a priority for both Councilwoman Morris and Councilman Josh Ingram.

Among the many inputs Virginia Cooperative Extension Services Agent Corey Childs gave to council, he claimed that in his experience, six chickens are on the high end for a residential permit. And in a scenario where chickens are ranging free in a fenced area, he remarked that clipping their wings would be a deterrent, but it would not absolutely prevent them from flying over the barrier. While he did not precisely say that free range is out of the question he raised some concerns, emphasizing the importance of cleanliness and advised council to stay on the safe side.

Council hears from Virginia Cooperative Extension Service Agent Corey Childs on concerns related to poultry policy in Urban Agriculture. Staff relies on Childs for his expertise.

For Morris, this issue is freighted with gravity as she promised one of her predecessors that she would pursue the goal of making urban space friendlier to agriculture. Unlike other council members, including recently installed Glenn Wood, who questioned whether a discussion on chickens surpassing half an hour is a legitimate use of council’s time, Morris considers it time well spent and believes there are many constituents who care deeply about this issue. The reality is that not all permit holders are completely in line with Planning and Zoning expectations, and Morris feels the codification of those expectations would be unfair to them. Non-compliance to the conditions under which the permit was given is a misdemeanor, but Kopishke explained in a private conversation after the public portion of the meeting that in such cases, the Planning and Zoning Department is content to simply revoke the permit without bringing a criminal charge.

After Mayor Lori Cockrell gathered a consensus that further discussion and informed guidance were needed, the item was postponed to a future work session. Having heard from Director of Finance B.J. Wilson, prior to the Urban Agriculture discussion, about a bid from Snyder Environmental Services, Inc., for the 2023 Sewer Rehabilitation Project, a bid which council expects to vote in favor of at the December 11 regular meeting, council quickly addressed several additional agenda items, and then went into closed meeting at 8:40 p.m. to receive legal counsel pertaining to HEPTAD litigation.

Click here to watch the December 4, 2023, Town Council Work Session.

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Town Talk

Vietnam Veteran Shares Tale of Grit and Brotherhood

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When:
March 4, 2026 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
2026-03-04T18:30:00-05:00
2026-03-04T21:30:00-05:00
Where:
Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
221 N. Commerce Avenue | Front Royal VA 22630
Contact:
FRWC RFL Wednesday Night Bingo

Tom LaCombe Reflects on His Time in Vietnam and the Unbreakable Bonds Formed.

In a moving interview, Tom Lacombe, a Vietnam War veteran and the proprietor of the OJ Rudacille General Store in Browntown, Virginia, shared his experiences from one of the most tumultuous periods in American history. His story is one of resilience in the face of adversity and the unspoken bonds forged in the heat of battle.

Called to serve during the Vietnam War, LaCombe found himself in the thick of action as an infantryman in the Army’s 4th Infantry Division. His days were filled with grueling search-and-destroy missions along the treacherous Cambodian border. Lacombe recalls the intensity and brutality of these operations, highlighting the physical and psychological toll they took on him and his fellow soldiers.

Among the harrowing tales, Lacombe recounted the tragic loss of his comrade, Ziggy, whose seemingly minor injury led to an unexpected fatality. These moments of loss and survival deeply impacted him, etching into his memory the fragility and value of life in war.

Yet, amidst the hardships, Lacombe also recalls moments of profound human connection. He shared a particularly touching memory of a fellow soldier sharing water during a challenging mission, a simple act that forged an immediate and lasting bond. These instances of camaraderie amidst chaos became beacons of hope and humanity.

Returning home, Lacombe, like many Vietnam veterans, faced a nation divided and often indifferent to their sacrifices. This led him to conceal his military past for years, a silence shared by many veterans of the era. It wasn’t until much later in life that Lacombe and others like him began to open up about their experiences, driven by a desire to share their stories and ensure they are not forgotten.

Today, LaCombe maintains a strong connection with fellow veterans, sharing a bond that transcends the specific details of each individual’s service. “They’re like brothers,” he says, reflecting on the deep kinship he feels with others who have shared the military experience, regardless of where or when they served.

Tom Lacombe’s journey through the Vietnam War and beyond is a poignant reminder of the complexities of military service and the enduring impact of war on those who serve. His experiences, captured in his book “Light Ruck,” offer a personal glimpse into a critical moment in history and underscore the importance of peace and understanding. Lacombe’s story is not just his own; it is a testament to the shared experiences of many veterans who have yet to tell their tales.


Town Talk is a series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders, and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea topic or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to news@RoyalExaminer.com

 

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Aders Insurance Agency, Inc (State Farm)

Aire Serv Heating and Air Conditioning

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Avery-Hess Realty, Marilyn King

Beaver Tree Services

Blake and Co. Hair Spa

Blue Mountain Creative Consulting

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Card My Yard

CBM Mortgage, Michelle Napier

Christine Binnix - McEnearney Associates

Code Jamboree LLC

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Down Home Comfort Bakery

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Explore Art & Clay

Family Preservation Services

First Baptist Church

Front Royal Independent Business Alliance

Front Royal/Warren County C-CAP

First Baptist Church

Front Royal Treatment Center

Front Royal Women's Resource Center

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

Fussell Florist

G&M Auto Sales Inc

Garcia & Gavino Family Bakery

Gourmet Delights Gifts & Framing

Green to Ground Electrical

Groups Recover Together

Habitat for Humanity

Groups Recover Together

House of Hope

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jean’s Jewelers

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Key Move Properties, LLC

KW Solutions

Legal Services Plans of Northern Shenendoah

Main Street Travel

Makeover Marketing Systems

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Merchants on Main Street

Mountain Trails

Mountain View Music

National Media Services

Natural Results Chiropractic Clinic

No Doubt Accounting

Northwestern Community Services Board

Ole Timers Antiques

Penny Lane Hair Co.

Philip Vaught Real Estate Management

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Rotary Club of Warren County

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Cinemas

Royal Examiner

Royal Family Bowling Center

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Oak Computers

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Ruby Yoga

Salvation Army

Samuels Public Library

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

Shenandoah Shores Management Group

St. Luke Community Clinic

Strites Doughnuts

Studio Verde

The Arc of Warren County

The Institute for Association & Nonprofit Research

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

The Vine and Leaf

Valley Chorale

Vetbuilder.com

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren Coalition

Warren County Democratic Committee

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warren County DSS Job Development

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

WCPS Work-Based Learning

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

Front Royal, VA
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Feels like: 36°F
Wind: 13mph NW
Humidity: 53%
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Upcoming Events

Dec
6
Wed
5:30 pm Free Holiday Meal @ Trinity Lutheran Church
Free Holiday Meal @ Trinity Lutheran Church
Dec 6 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Free Holiday Meal @ Trinity Lutheran Church
If one has read the Surgeon General’s 2023 report on America’s epidemic of loneliness and crisis of disconnection, one can then understand the significance that a Holiday Meal can have on the community at large. [...]
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 6 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
9
Sat
8:00 am Breakfast with Santa @ Rivermont Volunteer Fire Department
Breakfast with Santa @ Rivermont Volunteer Fire Department
Dec 9 @ 8:00 am – 11:00 am
Breakfast with Santa @ Rivermont Volunteer Fire Department
Rivermont Volunteer Fire Department is having a Breakfast with Santa on Saturday, December 9th, from 8:00 a.m.- 11:00 a.m. Adults are $10.00 Kids are $5.00 Children 5 and under are free!
12:00 pm Christmas Lunch for Kids, Vets a... @ Front Royal Elks Lodge
Christmas Lunch for Kids, Vets a... @ Front Royal Elks Lodge
Dec 9 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Christmas Lunch for Kids, Vets and Seniors @ Front Royal Elks Lodge
The Front Royal Elks Lodge will hold it’s annual Holiday Lunch for Kids, Veterans and Seniors on Saturday, December 9. Festivities will begin at 12 noon. Mr. and Mrs. Clause are said to be coming!
4:30 pm Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Dec 9 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. Discover our International Dark-Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and light conservation. Then join NASA’s Jet Propulsion[...]
Dec
12
Tue
7:30 pm American Legion Community Band C... @ Boggs Chapel at R-MA
American Legion Community Band C... @ Boggs Chapel at R-MA
Dec 12 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
American Legion Community Band Christmas Concert @ Boggs Chapel at R-MA
The American Legion Community Band, located in Front Royal, Virginia, was formed in 1986 and has been playing concerts in the area ever since. The conductors and band members are all volunteer musicians from the local[...]
Dec
13
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 13 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
16
Sat
7:00 am Pancake Breakfast @ Riverton United Methodist Church
Pancake Breakfast @ Riverton United Methodist Church
Dec 16 @ 7:00 am – 10:00 am
Pancake Breakfast @ Riverton United Methodist Church
Join us for pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, biscuits, sausage gravy, and juice/coffee! All are invited for this FREE event. Offering will be accepted.