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Governor Northam directs Virginia Employment Commission to speed up processing of unemployment claims

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On May 18, 2021, Governor Ralph Northam directed the Virginia Employment Commission to invest $20 million to dramatically expand the agency’s ability to process complicated unemployment insurance claims. Executive Directive Sixteen requires the agency to add 300 new adjudication staffers, make immediate technology upgrades, and complete a full modernization of the Commonwealth’s unemployment insurance system by October 1, 2021.

While Virginia ranks sixth in the nation for the timely payment of benefits to eligible applicants, the Governor’s action will speed up the resolution of cases flagged as potentially fraudulent or ineligible. These cases represent approximately four percent of all claims.

“Virginia is a national leader in getting unemployment benefits to eligible individuals, but it’s clear that complex cases must be resolved more quickly,” said Governor Northam. “That’s why I’m directing the Virginia Employment Commission to invest $20 million to significantly speed up its adjudication process and immediately implement long-overdue technology upgrades. This action will address many of the issues that have caused delays and ensure that we continue to deliver relief to Virginians who need it.”

Virginia’s unemployment system was set up to benefit businesses, not workers, and it has remained one of the lowest funded systems in the country for generations. In fact, Virginia ranks 51st out of 53 states and territories for the amount of federal funding it receives relative to what Virginia businesses pay in taxes. The problem was hidden by years of low unemployment and a consistently strong economy, and the pandemic has highlighted this reality.


Despite being underfunded, the Commonwealth’s unemployment insurance (UI) system has successfully distributed $12.9 billion in benefits to more than 1.3 million eligible Virginians since the pandemic started. Approximately 85 percent of Virginia applicants receive unemployment benefits within the first 21 days, making Virginia sixth in the nation—and first in the Mid-Atlantic region—for delivering unemployment benefits to eligible individuals.

If an individual’s initial claim is flagged for potential ineligibility or fraud, federal law requires the Virginia Employment Commission (VEC) to adjudicate the claim before proceeding with payment. Most individuals that are placed in the adjudication process are ultimately found ineligible for benefits.

Executive Directive Sixteen directs the VEC to take four immediate actions to adjudicate claims faster:

• Set a clear goal for resolving UI claims. Governor Northam has directed VEC to increase the number of adjudications being processed per week from 5,700 to 10,000 by June 30 and to 20,000 by July 31, 2021. This will be accomplished, in part, by finalizing a $5 million contract for over 300 additional adjudication officers. VEC is also coordinating with the Virginia Department of Human Resource Management (DHRM) to identify employees across Virginia’s state agencies who can temporarily support VEC.

• Continue investment in Customer Contact Center. Since the onset of the pandemic, VEC has quadrupled its customer service capacity in order to provide information and support to Virginians with questions about their claims. Governor Northam has directed VEC to expedite an additional contract for services and staff to augment the current expansion.

• Modernize the benefits system. Historic claim volume during the pandemic had previously delayed VEC’s progress in modernizing its 41-year-old benefits system. The agency has resumed the project, executing a contract for $5 million in state funding for technology upgrades. October 1, 2021, has been set as the target date for completing the final phase of the system. VEC will be implementing additional technology upgrades for customer service in the coming weeks to increase capacity.

• Collaborate with the Virginia congressional delegation to resolve federal funding disparity. States receive unemployment support from the federal government. The amount is based on how much Virginia businesses pay in federal unemployment insurance taxes. For Virginia, that ratio is among the lowest of all states and an increase typically requires businesses to pay more in taxes. This formula has underfunded Virginia’s UI system for years with respect to upgrading technology and maintaining staffing levels.

“As Virginia’s chief workforce official, I am always thinking about the Virginians behind the unemployment numbers,” said Chief Workforce Development Advisor Megan Healy. “As we move into the next phase of our recovery, the Governor’s actions will create additional capacity for processing the historic number of claims with indeterminate eligibility.”

Virginia has made a wide range of additional assistance available to those whose employment has been impacted by COVID-19. Low-income Virginians should refer to the Virginia Department of Social Services CommonHelp for guidance on applying for food, cash, childcare, and other assistance. Support is also available through the Virginia Career Works Referral Portal for those interested in workforce training, going back to school, or getting a job. This includes $36 million in funding through Governor Northam’s ‘Get Skilled, Get a Job, Give Back’ (G3) Program, which makes tuition-free community college available to low- and middle-income students who pursue jobs in high-demand fields.

“Starting the pandemic with low federal support and record low UI claims, the VEC has faced a greater than 1000% increase in workloads,” said Commissioner Ellen Marie Hess. “I am proud of the work our team has done and continues to do in the face of truly unprecedented demand. Weekly claims still exceed pre-pandemic levels, but each and every day, the dedicated public servants of the VEC continue marching forward and serving their fellow Virginians.”

The full text of Executive Directive Sixteen is available here.

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VSP 4:30 pm update on traffic crashes and disabled vehicles

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During the current winter storm impacting the Commonwealth, Virginia State Police troopers have responded to 369 traffic crashes and 282 disabled vehicles since 12:01 a.m. Sunday (Jan. 16) through 4:30 p.m. Sunday (Jan. 16). The majority of those crashes have involved only damage to vehicles. There have been no reported traffic fatalities during this time period.

Photo courtesy of Virginia State Police.


Since midnight on Sunday (Jan. 16), Virginia State Police have responded to:

Richmond Division: 28 Disabled Vehicles & 118 Traffic Crashes
At 1:40 p.m. Sunday, VSP narrowly escaped injury in Goochland County. The trooper was traveling east on I-64 when a vehicle tried to pass it. The vehicle lost control and struck the trooper’s patrol car at the 150-mile marker. No injuries were reported.


Culpeper Division: 37 Disabled Vehicles & 29 Traffic Crashes (Photo from Shenandoah County attached… crash with minor injuries.)

Appomattox Division: 41 Disabled Vehicles & 43 Traffic Crashes

Wytheville Division: 55 Disabled Vehicles & 59 Traffic Crashes

Chesapeake Division: 25 Disabled Vehicles & 26 Traffic Crashes

Salem Division: 60 Disabled Vehicles & 53 Traffic Crashes
At 3:25 p.m. Sunday, VSP responded to a multi-vehicle crash in Montgomery County. Four tractor-trailers and a pickup truck collided in the northbound lanes of Interstate 81 at the 127-mile marker. Two minor injuries were reported. The crash remains under investigation.

Fairfax Division: 36 Disabled Vehicles & 41 Traffic Crashes

As the storm continues to cross the state, Virginians are still advised to avoid travel Sunday and overnight into Monday, especially along the Interstate 81 corridor. Open highways allow VDOT crews to safely and effectively treat the roads.

If you MUST travel during the storm, please take these safety tips into consideration:

• Know Before You Go! Before heading out, check Virginia road conditions at www.511virginia.org or download the VDOT 511 app. Do not call 911 or #77 for road conditions. Please leave these emergency lines open for emergencies only.

• Clear ALL snow and ice from the roof, trunk, hood, and windows of your vehicle – car, SUV, minivan, pickup truck, commercial vehicle – before you travel.

• Use your headlights – in rain and snow. Virginia law requires headlights on when your wipers are active.

• Drive for conditions – slow your speed and increase your traveling distance between the vehicle ahead of you.

• Always buckle up.

• Avoid distractions – put down the phone.

• As the storm moves through the state, there will be an increased chance of encountering emergency vehicles assisting motorists. If it is safe to do so, carefully move over and give these responders plenty of room to safely work.

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Youngkin: Executive Order 2 – Reaffirming the rights of parents in the upbringing, education, and care of their children

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On January 15, 2022, Governor Glenn Youngkin signed several Executive Orders. Here is the complete text of Executive Order Two.

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby issue this Executive Order reaffirming the rights of parents in the upbringing, education, and care of their children.

Importance of the Issue
There is no greater priority than the health and welfare of Virginia’s children. Under Virginia law, parents, not the government, have the fundamental right to make decisions concerning the care of their children.

Recent government orders requiring virtually every child in Virginia to wear masks virtually every moment they are in school have proven ineffective and impractical. They have also failed to keep up with rapidly changing scientific information. For example, the August 12, 2021 Order of the State Health Commissioner explicitly relates to the Delta variant and not the Omicron variant, which results in less severe illness. The order states children under the age of 12 cannot obtain vaccines. Now children five and older are eligible.


The order also states vaccination rates for children that are now out of date. The order notes that “universal and correct mask use” helps reduce transmission. As parents and educators have observed, many children wear masks incorrectly, providing little or no health benefit. The masks worn by children are often ineffective because they are made from cloth material, and they are often not clean, resulting in the collection of impurities, including bacteria and parasites. Additionally, wearing masks for prolonged periods of time, such as for an entire school day, decreases their effectiveness. Masking may be more or less effective dependent on the age of the child.

At the same time that a universal masking requirement in schools has provided inconsistent health benefits, the universal requirement has also inflicted notable harm and proven to be  Impracticable.  Masks inhibit the ability of children to communicate, delay language development, and impede the growth of emotional and social skills. Some children report difficulty breathing and discomfort as a result of masks. Masks have also increased feelings of isolation, exacerbating mental health issues, which in many cases pose a greater health risk to children than COVID-19. Two years into the COVID-19 pandemic, mask mandates in schools have proved demoralizing to children facing these and other difficulties.

While the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends masks, its research has found no statistically significant link between mandatory masking for students and reduced transmission of COVID-19. And the CDC has acknowledged that certain masks may be ineffective due to the material from which they are made or how they are worn. A review of CDC, WHO, and other local and international health authorities’ recommendations reveal a lack of consensus on the costs and benefits of mask-wearing for children in school for many of the reasons noted above. In light of the variety of circumstances confronted by students in the Commonwealth, parents should have the ability to decide whether their child should wear masks for the duration of the school day. This approach is consistent with the broad rights of parents.

The Commonwealth recognizes in § 1-240.1 of the Code of Virginia, that “a parent has a fundamental right to make decisions concerning the upbringing, education, and care of the parent’s child.” Permitting parents to make decisions on where and when to wear masks permits the Commonwealth’s parents to make the best decision for the circumstances confronting each child. Parents can assess the risks and benefits facing their children, consult their medical providers, and make the best decision for their children based on the most up-to-date health information available.

While parents of some students with conditions that increase the risks of COVID-19 infection might require their children to remain masked during the duration of the school day, other parents may require masks for a more limited duration, if at all. Masks are not the only method to reduce transmission of COVID-19. Local schools must ensure they are improving inspection, testing, maintenance, repair, replacement, and upgrades of equipment to improve the indoor air quality in school facilities, including mechanical and nonmechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, filtering, purification, fans, control systems and window, and door repair. Other mitigation efforts can be made in consultation with health authorities. The benefit of mitigation efforts must always be weighed against the cost to children’s overall wellbeing.

Directive
Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia, by § 44-146.17 of the Code of Virginia, by any other applicable law, and by virtue of the
authority vested in the State Health Commissioner pursuant to §§ 32.1-13, 32.1-20, and 35.1-10 of the Code of Virginia, Executive Order Number Seventy-Nine (2021) is rescinded and the
following is ordered:

1. The State Health Commissioner shall terminate the Order of Public Health Emergency Order Ten (2021).

2. The parents of any child enrolled in an elementary or secondary school or school-based early childcare and educational program may elect for their children not to be subject to any mask mandate in effect at the child’s school or educational program.

3. No parent electing that a mask mandate should not apply to his or her child shall be required to provide a reason or make any certification concerning their child’s health or education.

4. A child whose parent has elected that he or she is not subject to a mask mandate should not be required to wear a mask under any policy implemented by a teacher, school, school district, the Department of Education, or any other state authority.

5. The Superintendent of Public Instruction shall rescind the Interim Guidance for COVID-19 Prevention in Virginia PreK-12 Schools, issued January 14, 2021, and updated October 14, 2021, and issue new guidance for COVID-19 Prevention consistent with this Order.

6. School districts should marshal any resources available to improve inspection, testing, maintenance, repair, replacement, and upgrades of equipment to improve the indoor air quality in school facilities, including mechanical and non-mechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, filtering, purification, fans, control systems and window, and door repair.

Effective Date of this Executive Order
This Executive Order shall be effective 12:00 a.m., Monday, January 24, 2022, and shall remain in full force and effect until amended or rescinded by further executive order.

Given under my hand and under the Seal of the Commonwealth of Virginia this 15th day
of January 2022.

Glenn Youngkin, Governor

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Youngkin promotes unity, agenda at inauguration

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RICHMOND, Va. — Republican Glenn Youngkin was sworn in Saturday as Virginia’s 74th governor on the steps of the state Capitol.

The political newcomer and former private equity executive is the commonwealth’s first Republican governor since Bob McDonnell’s 2009 victory.

The commonwealth also made history in electing Republicans Winsome Sears as lieutenant governor and Jason Miyares as attorney general. They are the first Black woman and Latino man to hold statewide office, respectively.

“The people of Virginia just elected the most diverse leadership in commonwealth history,” Youngkin said in his inauguration speech. “Sending a message that Virginia is big enough for the hopes and dreams of a diverse people.”


Sears emigrated from Kingston, Jamaica at 6 years old. She made history in 2001 as the first Black Republican woman to win a House seat, and she did so beating out a Democratic incumbent in a majority Black district.

“It actually encouraged me to do what I wanted to do,” said Jeanette Harris-Robinson, who is originally from Jamaica. She traveled from Florida to support Sears, who is her cousin.
“I was a little bit afraid of actually moving forward because I want to run for [office in] the city of Florida, for my city,” Harris-Robinson said. “Coming out here and seeing my cousin and looking at her — it just opened up a whole new world.”

The 30-degree weather didn’t impact turnout. Roughly 6,000 people were expected to attend, many of who dressed in their Sunday best to watch the inaugural ceremonies.

Dan and Debbie Robinson are small business owners who traveled to Richmond from Prince George’s County to show their support.
“It’s been an interesting couple of years for running a small business,” Dan Robinson said.

“It’s nice to be a part of history as well,” Debbie Robinson added.

The Robinsons own ByreBarn, an animal auction website. The couple said they look forward to seeing how the new administration changes agricultural regulations.
“The governor seems very positive in all he says,” Dan Robinson said. “Hopefully he can work with a lot of people.”

Youngkin will lead a divided government, with a slim majority of Republicans in the House of Delegates and Democrats narrowly in control of the Senate.

“My fellow Virginians, the spirit of Virginia is alive and well,” Youngkin said. “And together we will strengthen it.”

A parade with organizations ranging from law enforcement to STEM education was held after the inauguration ceremony. The Virginia Union University choir performed a song they wrote for Youngkin, which touched on the theme of Virginia united to “rebuild and reimagine” the state’s future.

“Together we’ll renew the promise of Virginia, so it will be the best place to live, work and raise a family,” he said.

Youngkin signed nine Executive Orders and two Executive Directives shortly after taking the oath, ranging from public health to withdrawing from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

The first order prevents the use of “divisive concepts” in education, including critical race theory. Youngkin’s campaign centered on ending critical race theory in public education. The theory is not currently taught in K-12 public schools but became a contentious talking point during the gubernatorial race. There will be a review of all policies to identify and end “inherently divisive concepts.”

The second-order eliminates a mask mandate in schools. Youngkin also signed a directive eliminating the vaccine mandate for state employees. The moves were made a day after Virginia reported over 17,000 new cases of COVID-19. Richmond Public Schools Superintendent Jason Kamras stated shortly afterward on social media that the district would maintain its mask mandate.

The new governor has more plans in alignment with his campaign promises.

“It’s a new day in Virginia, but the work is only beginning,” Youngkin stated.

By Tarazha Jenkins and Josephine Walker
Capital News Service

Capital News Service is a program of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Robertson School of Media and Culture. Students in the program provide state government coverage for a variety of media outlets in Virginia.

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Izzy’s arrival in Virginia nets 142 traffic accidents State Police have responded to before 1 PM

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During the current winter storm impacting the Commonwealth, Virginia State Police troopers have responded to 142 traffic crashes and 162 disabled vehicles since 12:01 a.m. Sunday (Jan. 16) through 12:45 p.m. Sunday (Jan. 16). The majority of those crashes have involved only damage to vehicles. There have been no reported traffic fatalities during this time period.

Photos courtesy of Virginia State Police

Since midnight on Sunday (Jan. 16), Virginia State Police have responded to:

Richmond Division: 12 Disabled Vehicles & 30 Traffic Crashes


Culpeper Division: 21 Disabled Vehicles & 6 Traffic Crashes (Photo from Culpeper County attached… crash with no injuries.)

Appomattox Division: 17 Disabled Vehicles & 20 Traffic Crashes

Wytheville Division: 45 Disabled Vehicles & 36 Traffic Crashes

Chesapeake Division: 18 Disabled Vehicles & 11 Traffic Crashes

Salem Division: 29 Disabled Vehicles & 32 Traffic Crashes
Virginia State Police remain on the scene of a multi-vehicle backup on Interstate 81 in Roanoke County. At approximately 12:05 p.m. Sunday, a tractor-trailer jackknifed and the cab disconnected from the trailer in the northbound lanes of I-81 at the 134-mile marker. A wrecker is on the scene working to get the tractor-trailer re-connected, so the northbound lanes can be cleared and traffic can begin moving again. However, in the backup of traffic, there are two additional reported traffic crashes – one with minor injuries reported and the other with no reported injuries. Fire and EMS have responded to the scene. Please follow 511 Salem for information on the detour.

Fairfax Division: 20 Disabled Vehicles & 7 Traffic Crashes

As the storm continues to cross the state, Virginians are still advised to avoid travel Sunday and overnight into Monday. especially along the Interstate 81 corridor. Open highways allow VDOT crews to safely and effectively treat the roads.

If you MUST travel during the storm, please take these safety tips into consideration:
• Know Before You Go! Before heading out, check Virginia road conditions at www.511virginia.org or download the VDOT 511 app. Do not call 911 or #77 for road conditions. Please leave these emergency lines open for emergencies only.
• Clear ALL snow and ice from the roof, trunk, hood, and windows of your vehicle – car, SUV, minivan, pickup truck, commercial vehicle – before you travel.
• Use your headlights – in rain and snow. Virginia law requires headlights on when your wipers are active.
• Drive for conditions – slow your speed and increase your traveling distance between the vehicle ahead of you.
• Always buckle up.
• Avoid distractions – put down the phone.
• As the storm moves through the state, there will be an increased chance of encountering emergency vehicles assisting motorists. If it is safe to do so, carefully move over and give these responders plenty of room to safely work.

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VDOT: Avoid all travel on Sunday afternoon into Monday morning in the Shenandoah Valley

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 Snow, ice, sleet, and rain are forecasted to enter the Commonwealth overnight and continue throughout the day Sunday. Precipitation combined with freezing temperatures will create treacherous driving conditions. The Virginia Department of Transportation is urging motorists to adjust travel plans and avoid being on the roads at all on Sunday, Jan. 16.

The current forecast indicates this event will drop significant snow, followed by freezing rain and ice in many areas, targeting the central region of Virginia and areas along the Interstate 81 corridor with the most extreme conditions.

The region, including Interstate 81, has terrain with steep grades that can increase the hazardous nature of travel during a heavy snow and ice event. This is very true for truck traffic and it is important that trucks avoid the region, particularly I-81, on Sunday and into early Monday.

Crews are conducting final stages of pre-treatment on interstates, primary and major secondary roadways statewide in advance of the storm and stand ready with the necessary equipment and adequate materials to clear and treat affected areas during and after precipitation falls.


VDOT crews and contractors will be prepositioned on Sunday to begin plowing and treating roads as the weather begins. Wreckers have been staged and tree crews have been notified for deployment as needed.

VDOT reminds motorists, bridges and overpasses freeze before roadways. If there is snow or ice on roadways, travel is hazardous.

With the risk of high winds, contractors are on standby to assist with downed trees, branches, and debris. Downed trees and power lines are expected and pedestrians and motorists should remain aware and cautious of these risks.

Remember:

  • Avoid travel
  • If you must travel during adverse weather conditions:
    • Review forecasts along your entire route
    • Allow plenty of time to reach your destination
    • Review and be familiar with alternative routes to your destination
    • Do not pass snowplows
    • Give crews time and room to treat roads
  • Visit 511Virginia.org for the latest road conditions before traveling. If possible, avoid travel until precipitation stops and road conditions improve.

For more information on winter weather travel, visit virginiadot.org/travel/snow.asp.

VDOT has a variety of traveler resources including Welcome Centers and Safety Rest Areas located throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Rest area locations can be found on the VDOT website at https://www.virginiadot.org/travel/map-rest-area.asp.

Road conditions and traffic cameras can be found on the VDOT 511 website at http://www.511Virginia.org, Roads with snow conditions will be marked minor, moderate, severe, or closed.

Road condition definitions:
Closed – Road is closed to all traffic.
Severe – drifting or partially blocking the road.
Moderate – snow or ice on major portions of the roadway.
Minor – bare pavement except for isolated spots of snow, ice, or slush. Driving with caution is recommended.

 

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Governor Glenn Youngkin signs 11 Day One Executive Actions

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Executive Orders:

• Executive Order Number One delivers on his Day One promise to restore excellence in education by ending the use of divisive concepts, including Critical Race Theory, in public education.

• Executive Order Number Two delivers on his Day One promise to empower Virginia parents in their children’s education and upbringing by allowing parents to make decisions on whether their child wears a mask in school.

• Executive Order Number Three delivers on his Day One promise to restore integrity and confidence in the Parole Board of the Commonwealth of Virginia.


• Executive Order Number Four delivers on his Day One promise to investigate wrongdoing in Loudoun County.

• Executive Order Number Five delivers on his Day One promise to make government work for Virginians by creating the Commonwealth Chief Transformation Officer.

• Executive Order Number Six delivers on his Day One promise to declare Virginia open for business.

• Executive Order Number Seven delivers on his Day One promise to combat and prevent human trafficking and provide support to survivors.

• Executive Order Number Eight delivers on his Day One promise to establish a commission to combat antisemitism.

• Executive Order Number Nine delivers on his Day One promise to withdraw from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI).

Executive Directives:

• Executive Directive Number One delivers on his fulfilling his Day One promise to jumpstart our economy by cutting job-killing regulations by 25 percent.

• Executive Directive Number Two delivers on his fulfilling his Day One promise to restore individual freedoms and personal privacy by rescinding the vaccine mandate for all state employees.

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Upcoming Events

Jan
19
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6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 19 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
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Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
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7:00 pm FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
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FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
The Front Royal Women’s Resource Center presents: WomanGathering – 7 PM, Virtual via Zoom Webinar with guest Dawn Devine, the Executive Director for the Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum. Topic: Why Children are our most valuable resource. Click[...]
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January 21 – FRWRC Book Circle – Free Virtual Event – Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. Questions about FRWRC Online Book Circle, please contact: Lyn Bement at dlbement@comcast.net or (540) 635-3000. In person Book Circle Postponed until[...]
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6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 26 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
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6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Feb 2 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
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Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
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Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area: Discover our International Dark-Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and light conservation. Then join NASA Jet Propulsion[...]