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Roles of McDonald, EDA Board & Goodlatte described at EDA hearing

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The EDA board and staff, seated in foreground, meet with Town and County officials, background, at Villa Ave. Community Center, circa late 2016 – Royal Examiner File Photos/Roger Bianchini

The level of authority given former Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority Executive Director Jennifer McDonald to pursue client contact leads and a consequent lack of oversight from her board of directors was a primary issue in testimony and closing arguments on Friday, May 31.

In fact, some professional tension was palpable between McDonald defense counsel Jay McDannell and lead EDA attorney Cullen Seltzer as they summarized the cases they had presented over 2-1/2 days leading to closing arguments beginning at 12:45 p.m., Friday afternoon. The result of that third and final day of the EDA civil suit motions hearing was previously reported in Royal Examiner, below:

Some McDonald assets frozen, jointly-owned exempted in EDA civil case

In beginning his rebuttal to the plaintiff attorney’s closing statement McDannell referenced what he termed “vitriolic attacks on my client”. They were attacks he said he had tried not to respond in kind to – “That ends today” he told the court.


And he wasn’t kidding – McDonald’s attorney called the plaintiff case “craven and stupid” adding, “They put the cart before the horse” in an attempt to cover what he called “a failed filing” of the EDA $17.6 million civil action against nine defendants alleged to have engaged with McDonald in a wide, if compartmentalized conspiracy to embezzle or misdirect millions of dollars in EDA assets.

“The largest claim is a breach of contract claim for a contract that has never been breached – and it is against someone else,” McDannell noted of the $10 million loan the EDA secured from United Bank for ITFederal LLC and its CEO Truc “Curt” Tran.

Truc ‘Curt’ Tran on EDA-Royal Phoenix site on Dec. 20, 2018, the day Jennifer McDonald resigned as EDA executive director. Tran was checking progress on his one-story, 10,000 s.f. construction project.

In fact, a significant portion of former EDA board member Ron Llewellyn’s testimony, which was by far the lengthiest of four current or former board members called to testify Friday, addressed the process and rationale in acquiring that loan.

A nine-year board member prior to his resignation effective March 23, Llewellyn told the court that the ITFederal project “was considerably different than any other project we ever worked on … We were all excited about the first Brownfield site project,” Llewellyn noted of the first commercial client drawn to a planned 147-acre business park on the former 467-acre Avtex federal Superfund site in the Town of Front Royal.

Llewellyn testified he had concerns about the project early on due to an inability to find any substantive information about the company and its alleged $140-million or so in annual federal government contracts online. However, he noted that the EDA’s executive director always assured him she had verified the validity of the information about ITFederal and its government contracts.

“Did you ask how she verified it?” McDannell pressed Llewellyn on cross examination.

“No, not precisely,” Llewellyn admitted.

“Maybe because it was brought to us by the congressman due diligence wasn’t done. I couldn’t find anything online but Jennifer always had an explanation, I thought was through the congressman,” Llewellyn said.

“So it got credibility from Congressman Goodlatte – what would you say the impact of that was?” McDonald’s attorney asked.

“More than it should have,” Llewellyn testified about three-and-a-half to four years down the road from then U.S. Congressman Robert Goodlatte’s championing of ITFederal in 2014-2015 as a $40-million investor who would bring 600-plus high-paying tech jobs to this community.

Former Sixth District U.S. Congressman Robert Goodlatte promised ‘prosperity coming your way’ when he introduced ITFederal and its CEO to the EDA as a major Avtex site commercial redevelopment opportunity in 2015.

In fact, Llewellyn recalled a conversation with Goodlatte at the October 2015 ITFederal ribbon-cutting here launching the idea of a $10 million loan to Tran’s company. Llewellyn said he, McDonald, then-EDA Board members Patty Wines, who was board chair, and Jim Eastham who was in banking professionally, were in the group with whom Goodlatte first broached the ITFederal loan idea.

Llewellyn testified that McDonald reported back that when first offered the loan, Tran had balked. However, the EDA decided to continue pursuing the loan after Goodlatte explained he wanted to be able to promote the Avtex Brownfield site “to other prospects by saying, ‘We not only got you this nice piece of land but financing for your project too’.

“So Jennifer went back to Tran and explained that Goodlatte said it needed to be done anyway (whether he needed it or not), and he says, ‘Okay’,” Llewellyn said of the process he recalled achieving the ITFederal bank loan.

What Llewellyn didn’t explain, and wasn’t really asked to at this hearing level, was why the EDA board would agree to extend a 30-year payback on a $10-million loan to Tran that the EDA has a 7-year balloon payment due to First Bank & Trust of Abington on. For you non-bankers out there, on the surface, those conflicting schedules mean the EDA must pay the loan back to the bank in full after seven years, while Tran has another 23 years to pay the balance on the $10 million back to the EDA. Talk about economic development working for YOU!

However, EDA Attorney Dan Whitten explained to Royal Examiner that the EDA has the option of renegotiating the monthly amount of Tran’s payback; and will likely attempt to refinance its loan payment to First Bank & Trust after those seven years. So if things go well the EDA may be able to continue to have Tran’s payments cover the cost of a refinanced bank loan. Whitten said the discrepancy likely occurred because the EDA-Tran terms were signed in September 2015 when the Town bridge loan was made to the EDA, and the EDA-First Bank & Trust terms were signed three months later when the bank loan was realized in December 2015.

Maybe it’s not as bad as it seems – see above attorney’s explanation. So best case the bank agrees to stretch its payback term to match Tran’s and the EDA can continue to have the ITFed payments cover its loan costs. Worst case, the EDA defaults on the loan and the bank owns the Royal Phoenix Brownfield property put up as collateral – or is that a BEST case scenario? Hey, maybe these guys are smarter than they look …

And on the bright side, as Town Councilman Eugene Tewalt likes local media to stress, the Town of Front Royal DID get its twice-extended to three-months $10-million “bridge loan” to the EDA and Tran back in full when the loan through First Bank & Trust of Abingdon was accomplished. However as we also recall, the Town did lose out on two months of interest totaling around $8,000 because the term of the “bridge loan” was supposed to be a month and the bridge loan arrangement only included one month’s payment equal to what the Town had been collecting in monthly interest on those $10-million dollars in an investment account.

But back to the civil litigation hearing’s closing arguments of May 31, 2019: citing EDA “board failings of oversight” McDannell told the court of his clients’ culpability, “Her actions are attributable to them – not that she did everything right, but did she misunderstand the authority her board had given her?” McDannell asked rhetorically with a clear indication of his thoughts on an answer.

Testimony indicated there were minimal conditions imposed on how Tran spends that $10-million loan from the EDA. It appears he may spend about $2 million or so here if the ITFederal aspect of his project falls through, as it now seems it will. The EDA lawsuit is seeking recovery of the ITFederal loan.

However in the plaintiff’s closing statement delivered first, Seltzer pointed to the testimony of the four former and current EDA board members heard that day. They were asked in to testify about Defense Exhibit 8 offered the previous day to illustrate board approval of a McDonald purchase of up to $2.5 million for potential use as an industrial cattle farm operation by a Tran company, Front Royal Farms LLC. Testimony indicated the planned Tran operation would produce beef to be sold in the Far East, particularly to Vietnam, Tran’s native country.

Former EDA Treasurer William Biggs, current Vice-Chairman Bruce Drummond, current Front Royal Vice-Mayor William Sealock, and Llewellyn all testified that they had not previously seen the Closed Session, Confidential Resolution authorizing McDonald to spend up to $2.5 million on a property for the cattle ranch land purchase on Trans’ behalf. That was the defense exhibit EDA Attorney Dan Whitten described during his Thursday testimony as a “fabricated document” produced by McDonald.

All four past and present EDA board members said Friday that while it appeared their signatures were on the document, they had not previously seen that particular resolution. They also verified Whitten’s testimony of the previous day that such a resolution would not be signed in closed session or likely be marked “Confidential” as it was.

The quartet of EDA board members also expressed varying degrees of knowledge or a lack thereof about EDA board discussion of Tran’s prospective Front Royal Farms operation. However, all agreed whatever discussion had occurred was far from the authorization of millions of EDA dollars to be committed to the purchase of land for such an endeavor.

Previous hearing testimony indicated that those parcels referred to as “the Buck Mountain properties” were sold back to the original owner William Vaught Jr. a month or so after purchased by McDonald real estate company DaBoyz LLC at a $600,000 loss.

“Even after she left (the EDA) she continued to conceal against those board members we heard from today. She betrayed that trust in the most pernicious ways,” Seltzer told the court in summarizing his case for attachment of $3.17 million of McDonald or her real estate companies’ assets.

Of Defense Exhibit 8, the EDA attorney called it “unbelievable, bare-faced contempt”, not only of her former board members but of the court in its attempt to render a judgment on the freezing or releasing of McDonald assets related to the civil litigation.

“She has attempted to deceive the court – I’ve never seen anything like that in a courtroom,” Seltzer said of the introduction of an apparently fraudulent document in support of a defense motion not to enjoin defendant assets.

The Sands-Anderson attorney made it clear he was not implicating his legal adversary in that deception – “He has been used by his client to perpetuate shocking deceit,” Seltzer told the court.

However, McDannell disputed that assessment, noting his client’s agreement to withdraw the document and her voluntary assertion that two properties under her control were being held in a “constructive trust” for the EDA.

He also pointed out to the court that his client had not tried to convert her real estate assets into cash and flee prior to facing the civil and criminal charges now hanging over her head, those latter charges leaving her incarcerated as a flight risk.

As reported in our above-linked initial story of the court ruling, Judge Athey took a middle ground in attaching some McDonald cash and real estate assets and not others, on the latter front leaving those co-owned with other family members alone, and on the former leaving her funds to pay for her defense against the felony criminal charges she faces.

Judge Clifford Athey Jr. allowed McDonald access to some personal financial assets in order to be able to pay for her defense against criminal charges that now have her incarcerated without bond as a flight risk.

See Related Story:

EDA Attorney accuses former executive director of forging document

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Crime/Court

Linden man arrested, charged for child abuse

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On October 12, 2021, at approximately 8:20pm, Warren County Sheriff’s Office received a call about an 8-year-old juvenile walking on Freezeland Road, Linden, Virginia. The caller stated the juvenile advised them they were running away from home due to being abused by their father. Deputies responded to 78 Lookout Point Way, Linden, Virginia, where the juvenile resides to perform a welfare check. Upon arrival deputies spoke with Matthew Steven Lewis, the juvenile’s father, and made contact with the juvenile. During the welfare check, deputies observed that the juvenile had sustained multiple injuries. Deputies had Warren County Fire & Rescue respond to the residence, and the juvenile was transported to Warren Memorial Hospital for further treatment.

After the initial investigation Matthew Steven Lewis was placed under arrest for Domestic Assault (M), Child Endangerment (F), and Strangulation (F). Matthew Steven Lewis was held without bond at RSW Regional Jail, preliminary hearing is set for November 4, 2021.

Matthew Steven Lewis. Photo / RSW Regional Jail

Warren County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank Front Royal Police Department, Virginia State Police, and Warren County Department of Social Services for their assistance.


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Harrisonburg man faces Reckless Driving charge in fatal 3-car crash on I-81 in Rockingham County

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Virginia State Police Trooper M. Salladay is investigating a three-vehicle fatal crash in Rockingham County. The crash occurred Thursday, October 7th, at 7:10 p.m. along Interstate 81 at the 249-mile-marker.

A 2006 Buick Lucerne was traveling South on I-81 when it rear-ended a 2010 Honda CRV that stopped due to heavy traffic. The impact caused the Honda to be pushed into a 2017 Chevrolet Silverado that was also stopped due to traffic. The Honda then caught fire.

The driver of the Buick, Samuel C. Holtzman, 22, of Harrisonburg, VA, suffered minor injuries in the crash and was transported to Sentara RMH Hospital for treatment. Holtzman was wearing a seatbelt.

The driver of the Honda, a 23-year-old female, of Chesterfield, VA, died at the scene of the crash as a result of her injuries. The female was wearing a seatbelt. The female’s identity is being withheld pending next of kin notification.


The driver of the Chevrolet, a 59-year-old male, of Thorn Hill, TN, was not injured in the crash. The male was wearing a seatbelt.

Holtzman was charged with reckless driving.

VSP’s Culpeper Division Crash Reconstruction Team responded to the scene and is assisting with the ongoing crash investigation.

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Early ‘Person of Interest’ convicted in 2008 murder of Marshall-based Zen Buddhist monk

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Over 13 years after a Korean Zen Buddhist Monk with ties to this community, known popularly by his ordained name Monk Mogu, was found stabbed to death in June 2008 several days after his death at his Marshall residence/temple, a fellow countryman and early suspect in the investigation has been found guilty of Second Degree Murder in the case.

Won Yung Jung, 62 at the time of his late November 2020 arrest in his home area of Georgia, will be sentenced in January in the death of Du Chil Park. According to observers at the courthouse, a jury deliberated for about three hours, Thursday, September 30, before returning the verdict.

Suspect Won Yung Jung arrested in Atlanta suburb in late 2020 for 2008 murder of Zen Buddhist Monk Mogu in Marshall, Va. Courtesy Photo Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office

While Jung never admitted to the murder, he led Fauquier investigators aided by FBI Korean language experts, on a twisting path of the initial denial of knowing the monk; to later admissions of being present and extremely intoxicated the evening of the June 23-24, 2008 murder, and awakening on the monk’s couch the next day to find Park’s bloody corpse in the monk’s bedroom.


According to Fauquier Times coverage of investigative agents testimony at trial Jung eventually admitted to going to the monk’s Free State area home/temple on June 23, 2008, to ask for help in paying off a gambling debt. He said while the monk said he did not have money to help him, he agreed to accompany his long-time acquaintance to his Atlanta suburb area home while he asked for help from family members on the gambling debt. Jung reasoned that having a monk accompany him would lend credence to his plea for financial assistance, an agent testified. One of the interviewing agents also testified that Jung told them his nickname was “coma” because he often blacks out when drinking. Jung was charged with Second Degree Murder due the apparent lack of premeditation, according to his recollection of events.

In the end, the jury rejected defense arguments that Jung had no motive to kill Park and that his inability to remember the murder due to his level of intoxication was sufficient evidence he did not commit it.

Information released by Fauquier authorities in the wake of his 2008 murder indicated Park came to America in 1998 and established the Jungtosa Zen Buddhist Temple in the Springfield area of Fairfax County, moving the temple to Marshall in March of 2004 and continuing his healing work in acupuncture and moxibustion, the latter also “an oriental medicine therapy”.

Born in Kyong Ju, South Korea around 1951-52, Fauquier authorities also noted that “in the 1970’s/80’s Park was an activist against former Korean military governments. He was imprisoned in 1974 for hiding an activist on the run and then became a Monk in 1978” and “operated a small temple in Chung Noung, a part of Seoul, where he treated poor people with acupuncture and moxibustion.”

Du Chil Park, aka Monk Mogu, was recalled by local friend for his spiritual commitment ‘to help alleviate pain for all sentient beings’. – Courtesy Photo

A Warren County resident with connections to Park and his healing work as Monk Mogu noted he often traveled to the Front Royal area to treat children and adults, some with serious physical disabilities. “His mantra was always ‘to help alleviate pain for all sentient beings’,” that area friend told this reporter.

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Former Christiansburg Police Officer sentenced to 40 years for distribution and possession of child pornography

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RICHMOND (September 29, 2021) – Former Christiansburg Police Department Officer Ethan Michael Havens, 26, of Christiansburg, has pleaded guilty in Montgomery County Circuit Court to three counts of distribution of child pornography and two counts of possession of child pornography. He was sentenced to three years of active imprisonment with an additional 37 years suspended. Attorney General Mark R. Herring made the announcement after the guilty plea was accepted by Circuit Court Judge Robert M.D. Turk.

“Anyone who possess and distributes child pornography must be held accountable for contributing to the exploitation of children, but especially when that person is a law enforcement officer who has taken an oath to protect his community,” said Attorney General Herring. “My team and I remain dedicated to keeping dangerous individuals off of our streets and out of our communities. I want to thank my team for their hard work as well as our local and state partners for their continued collaboration on important cases like this one.”

Evidence presented in court showed that Havens had distributed four images of child pornography through his Twitter account, all of which depicted the sexual exploitation of minor females. Officers subsequently interviewed Havens who admitted to viewing child pornography on his cell phone and to exchanging child pornographic images through Twitter. A subsequent forensic examination of his seized cell phone revealed 38 saved images of child pornography. Havens was employed as a police officer with the Christiansburg Police Department when he committed the crimes. As part of the plea, Havens will have to register as a sex offender in any jurisdiction where he works or resides following imprisonment.

This case was investigated by the Virginia State Police, as part of the Southern Virginia Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. Assistant Attorney General Cynthia Paoletta of Attorney General Herring’s Computer Crime Section prosecuted the case on behalf of the Commonwealth.


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11th St. verbal altercation leads to 2 malicious wounding charges

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On Friday, September 24, 2021, at approximately 11:15 am, Front Royal Police Department received a report of a fight in the 600 block of West 11th Street. Upon arrival, two victims were located outside of 654 W. 11th Street. Both were suffering wounds to their face and head. The offender had left the scene on foot but was located by officers approximately 2 blocks away. The victims were a 21-year-old male and a 50-year-old female who were both assaulted after a verbal altercation in the roadway. Both victims suffered blunt force trauma to the head and face after being struck multiple times by the offender. The victims were both transported to Warren Memorial Hospital due to injuries sustained in the assault.

As a result of this investigation, Front Royal resident Michael A. Craig Sr., 36, was arrested on two counts of § 18.2- 51; Malicious Wounding and transported to the Rappahannock Shenandoah Warren (RSW) Regional Jail where he is currently being held without bond. A court date for these offenses is set for November 30, 2021, at 10:00 am in Warren County General District Court.

Anyone with further information in connection to this investigation is asked to contact Front Royal Police Detective M.R. Ramey at (540) 636-2208 or by email at mramey@frontroyalva.com.

Michael A. Craig Sr. Photo / RSW Regional Jail


Name: Michael A. Craig Sr.
Description: 5’09” black male, black hair, and brown eyes
Address: 624 Massanutten Ave, Front Royal VA 22630
Offenses: § 18.2-51. Shooting, stabbing, etc., with intent to maim, kill, etc. (x2 counts)

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Judge dismisses Meza appointment/’election’ challenge a second time

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On Wednesday morning, September 22, counsels for Plaintiff Paul L. Aldrich and Defendants the Town of Front Royal and recently resigned councilman Jacob L. Meza, revisited oral arguments on the defendants’ Demurrer motion to dismiss the plaintiff case as not having the legal standing to proceed.

And the following afternoon Warren County Circuit Court Judge William W. Sharp issued a written ruling, upholding the defense demurrer motion to dismiss for the second time. That despite an earlier Thursday morning request from plaintiff attorney David Downes for an additional week to file supporting arguments on the aspect of immediate or preliminary injunctions for relief sought by the plaintiff, raised the previous day. Downes explained in his written request that he had not anticipated the issue of immediate relief injunctions remaining part of the arguments Wednesday, due to evolving circumstances – most prominently Meza’s resignation, effective immediately at council’s July 26 meeting – and previous rulings on the issue upholding that portion of the defense demurrer motion.

On Thursday, Sept. 23, the Plaintiff team of Paul Aldrich, right, and his attorney David Downes, pictured here after a May hearing, got a ‘strike 2’ call in the legal challenge of Jacob Meza’s January appointment to town council. But with Meza since resigned will they take another swing? Royal Examiner File Photos by Roger Bianchini

“As I write this, I am aware that Mr. Downes has filed a Motion seeking additional time to brief the de facto officer doctrine, raised by the Court. I see no reason to grant the motion. This appears to be a well-established common law doctrine, and I am confident it applies to this case. Further, the Court had previously raised this doctrine in ruling on the Demurrer to the original Complaint, yet the Plaintiff ignored that part of my opinion in his Amended Complaint,” Judge Sharp noted in denying the plaintiff counsel request for time to submit amended arguments.


Judge Sharpe quoted several past U.S. Supreme Court justices on the advised willingness judges should have to re-examine their own decisions in prefacing his own re-examination of his initial April 7 ruling in favor of the defense demurrer motion to dismiss.

“It is ‘the duty of every judge and every court to examine its own decisions … without fear, and to revise them without reluctance’,” Justice William O. Douglas quoting a judge of the New York Court of Appeals.

“Wisdom too often never comes, and so one ought not to reject it merely because it comes late,” Justice Felix Frankfurter.

“I see no reason why I should be consciously wrong today because I was unconsciously wrong yesterday,” Justice Robert H. Jackson.

Of his decision to allow an amended plaintiff complaint to be filed and revisit his original ruling for the defense, Sharp wrote in late April, “Not a small part of my decision to enter the stay order, and give one last chance for oral argument, is my realization that I gave a very poor articulation of my reasons for my original decision, and I do not want to make that mistake again. It is therefore my intention to give a written explanation of my decision, whichever way it goes, in which my words are more carefully expressed.”

But in his continued analysis of arguments on the standing and substance of Plaintiff Aldrich’s filing, made as a town taxpaying citizen potentially impacted financially and otherwise by votes of an illegally appointed council member, Judge Sharp upheld his initial ruling in favor of the defense motion to dismiss. The judge addressed the changed circumstance of Meza’s resignation removing major points of relief sought by the plaintiff. “Gone is any issue of removing an ‘illegally’ installed councilman,” Sharp observed.

After reading a prepared statement into the record at the outset of the July 26 Town Council meeting announcing his immediate resignation, Jacob Meza, right, shakes hands with Mayor Holloway, whose council seat he was appointed to fill on Jan. 4, as he exits ‘stage right’.

Of the plaintiff claim of potential damage from Meza’s appointment, Sharp wrote: “Mr. Aldrich’s second amended complaint establishes that he is a citizen and taxpayer of the Town of Front Royal. The complaint alleges several decisions of the town council in which Mr. Meza participated, resulting in expenditures. However, the complaint does not allege that any of these decisions impacted any of Mr. Aldrich’s rights. Furthermore, the complaint does not allege that Mr. Meza’ s presence on the council had a causal relationship to any of these expenditures. While he participated in the votes, including moving or seconding motions, there is no claim that the actions would not have passed but for Meza’s participation.”

Noting his previous ruling that council actions could not be voided due to Meza’s participation in votes prior to a ruling on the legality of his seating, Judge Sharp made it fairly clear a second request for an amended complaint might be a futile gesture. “As Meza is no longer subject to removal from office and his prior actions are not voidable, I do not see any potential ongoing justiciable controversy, much less impacted right of the petitioner, that would warrant permitting another Amended Complaint,” Sharp concluded.

But has the question of whether the wording of the Town Charter dating to 1937, supports the reappointment by “election” of council members within a year of their leaving office been resolved? The judge dealt with his interpretation of that core question in his written decision:

“While Mr. Aldrich’s lack of standing disposes of the case, even if he had proper standing to challenge the appointment of Mr. Meza to the council, this claim would also fail under the law. The chief phrase of the Town Charter in dispute concerns whether membership on the town council is an ‘office under the jurisdiction of the council.’ There can be no dispute that the members of the council are officers of the town, as provided under §4 of the Charter. The question, rather, is whether such officers are considered to be under the jurisdiction of the council in the context of §47.

Chapter 47 of the Town Charter was the basis of the plaintiff’s challenge of the Meza appointment. It states: “No member of the council of the Town of Front Royal shall be appointed or elected to any office under the jurisdiction of the council while he is a member of the council, or for one year thereafter,” the relevant Section 47 passage reads. However, the court continued to side with defense counsel arguments that other Chapters of the Town Charter applied to council appointments to fill vacancies, specifically 6D and 9.

In her Demurrer filing for dismissal, defense counsel Heather Bardot pointed to Section 6D and related wording on filling council vacancies, such as the one created by Councilman Chris Holloway’s November 2020 election to mayor. “The council may fill any vacancy that occurs within the membership of council for the unexpired term, provided that such vacancy is taken within 45 days of the office becoming vacant,” Section 6D states. No reference to a one-year hiatus per appointments is made here, Bardot noted. Only the court’s authority to make the appointment were council to deadlock and be unable to fill the seat within the prescribed 45 days, is acknowledged.

Meza’s appointment was made January 4, 2021, four days after Holloway relinquished his council seat to become mayor and four days after Meza, who did not run for reelection after a controversial final year in office, vacated his seat. In 2020 Meza appeared to have alienated a portion of his base related to his Valley Health employment during the previous year. Meza did not express support for the “Birth Local” movement seeking to have Valley Health include a Maternity Unit in the new Warren Memorial Hospital. And after recusing himself from previous discussion of the new hospital funding due to his employment, the councilman chose to cast a deciding vote authorizing that EDA funding on the Town side.

In oral arguments on the original complaint, plaintiff counsel Downes suggested that Chapter 47 was intended to include council seats in the one-year prohibition, not only because council members are “under the jurisdiction” of their colleagues, but also to avoid the appearance or fact of partisan political cronyism in town politics. With the four member majority that appointed him by a 4-1 vote coming from the county Republican Committee, of which he is also a member, plaintiff counsel suggested one might at least infer the appearance of political cronyism in returning Meza to office so quickly after a voluntary choice to leave that office.

However, the judge continued to side with the defense stance that the Chapter 47 one-year prohibition applied only to appointed Town staff positions.

Town Hall and former Councilman Jacob Meza have prevailed in the second go-round of a legal challenge of Meza’s appointment to fill a council vacancy four days after he voluntarily left council.

“A comparison with the other named offices-especially those clearly under the Council’s jurisdiction-is instructive. The town treasurer, town manager, and town clerk are explicitly appointed by the council as a general rule, rather than as an exception to fill vacancies. The Council is authorized to exercise considerable oversight on them, with the ability to remove them from office and/or reassign their duties to other officers. By contrast, the council may only remove one of its own members in the case of repeated absences and exerts no other comparable oversight on its members. Furthermore, while the Charter provides that only the Council has authority to appoint the treasurer, clerk, and town manager, the Council shares its authority with the Circuit Court to appoint members to the Council when a vacancy arises. The Council can fairly be said to exercise general power over the clerk, treasurer, and town manager, but not over its own membership. Therefore, it would be inappropriate to find that membership in the Council is an office of the sort meant to be governed by §47,” Judge Sharp wrote of his stance on the matter at the heart of the citizen challenge of Meza’s appointment.

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11:00 am Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
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Fall Farm Days: History of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area.  During Fall Farm Days History Weekend, step back in time and see history come to life. Stroll through the Historic Area buildings, interact with our living historians and discover our links to historic[...]
11:00 am The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 23 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Blacksmith Shop in the Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and[...]
1:00 pm Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
This is a painting class for children 8 years old and up. Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at Strokes of Creativity. Date: Saturday, October 23,[...]
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11:00 am Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 24 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area.  During Fall Farm Days History Weekend, step back in time and see history come to life. Stroll through the Historic Area buildings, interact with our living historians and discover our links to historic[...]
11:00 am The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 24 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Blacksmith Shop in the Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and[...]
6:30 pm Benefit Concert for Front Royal ... @ Riverton Church
Benefit Concert for Front Royal ... @ Riverton Church
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Benefit Concert for Front Royal Police @ Riverton Church
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11:00 am Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
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Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
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Thu
10:00 am Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie at Strokes of Creativity. Tickets: CLICK HERE Cost: $80 for 6 weeks Dates: Thursdays – Oct 21, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18, Dec 4 Time: 10 am[...]
1:00 pm Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 28 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Grades 4th and 5th. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: 9 and 10 years old Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at[...]