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Religious Intolerance 2022

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historically speaking

Three years ago, I wrote an article about religious intolerance. My premise was that America had actually never been that religiously tolerant, that today religion, Christianity in particular, was the one area where intolerance was still acceptable, and that those who often cried for the most tolerance could be the most intolerant. I used the fact that The Book of Mormon won a Tony Award as evidence, as well as how Hollywood continues to criticize Christians while attacking any who dares say anything negative about Muslims or Jews, let alone anyone of a different race or sexual orientation. Upon seeing a preview of FX’s latest crime thriller “Under the Banner of Heaven,” I though it’s time to maybe reexamine religion in America amongst this new culture of political correctness. What I found is that history has not changed and that Hollywood has once again used a similar scapegoat to attack those who believe in a God.

Let me start by saying I am a fan of Jon Krakauer. Into the Wild and Into Thin Air, the two books he wrote before Under the Banner, are both amazing reads. It’s his fourth book where he turns from his themes of exploring and often losing to nature towards religion and violence that seems unfamiliar.  The premise of Under the Banner of Heaven is that religious people are irrational and, as irrational and fanatical people, they commit irrational violent acts. As with the musical The Book of Mormon, FX is targeting an easy sect of Christianity, one that even other Christians are Ok seeing attacked. While this particular story deals with a polygamous splinter group of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons), Krakauer’s premise is for all believers of God, as he wrote in Chapter Six of Under the Banner of Heaven, “All religious belief is a function of nonrational faith. And faith, by its very definition, tends to be impervious to intellectual argument or academic criticism.”

The TV adaption has not been released and so I do not know how closely it stays true to the book, but the book looks at the 1984 murders committed by two brothers belonging to the FLDS. Krakauer believes it was their fanatical devotion to God that allowed them to justify their cruel actions. As part of his evidence, he examines the history of the Mormon Church, which he links with violence and extremism. As a historian, I am clearly not going to argue that religion has not played a part in violence. Examples would take all the space in this article and then some, so instead I want to focus on one quote Krakauer used to title his work, “Under the Banner of Heaven.”

This quote was taken from a speech given by the third president or prophet of The Church of Jesus Christ, John Taylor, given in 1880 in which he said, “God is greater than the United States, and when the Government conflicts with heaven, we will be ranged under the banner of heaven against the Government. The United States says we cannot marry more than one wife. God says different.” While polygamy is appalling to the vast majority of Americans, historically speaking, the concept of standing up to authority for a higher cause has been common and even celebrated. In 1846 when America declared war on our neighbors to the south, not all Americans agreed with the invasion.  One such man was the author Henry David Thoreau. He so disagreed with America’s actions that he was imprisoned for his refusal to pay taxes to support what he believed was an unjust war. The year after the war he published his thoughts in an essay called “Civil Disobedience.” Thoreau wrote, “I cannot for an instant recognize that political organization as my government which is the slave’s government also. All men recognize the right of revolution; that is, the right to refuse allegiance to and to resist the government, when its tyranny or its inefficiency are great and unendurable.” He even went as far as to say about his own imprisonment, “In an unjust society the only place for a just man is prison.”

Starting in the 1920s, another man took up the cry for civil disobedience as he struggled for freedom against the British Empire. Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Civil disobedience becomes a sacred duty when the state becomes lawless or corrupt.” He believed people needed to resist the civil government when that government hurt the people. Unlike Thoreau, Gandhi actually pushed out his oppressors in the name of justice.

Finally, a few years after Gandhi, another man made a similar statement about resisting the government for higher laws.  In 1963 while in prison in Birmingham, Ala., Dr. Martin Luther King gave his justifications for breaking the law that landed him in jail. King wrote, “One has not only a legal, but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” Also, like Thoreau, King spoke to those in prison when he said, “An individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and who willingly accepts the penalty of imprisonment in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the highest respect for the law.”

I am not saying that John Taylor standing up for polygamy is the same as these men, but they were all standing up for something they believed in. They also had another thing in common: all their protests were nonviolent. As militant as Taylor’s speech may seem, there was nothing violent associated with him during his almost seven years as leader of the Church or any other church leader after him. If Taylor’s words condemn his as violent, then Thoreau, Gandhi and King must also be condemned as violent. If Krakauer’s thesis is correct and Mormon splinter groups, Latter Day Saints, and all religious people are inherently violent, then so must be all civil rights workers, Indians, and, I guess, students of American literature. If only some of those first groups are inherently violent, then his logic must agree that all Muslims are terrorists because some are.

While I am not calling for any sort of cancellation, Hollywood has the right to air any kinds of program they want. Yet it reminds me of the saying that people who live in glass houses should not throw stones.  Also, that, historically speaking, America has had an interesting relationship with religion. While we still praise our concept of freedom of religion, we also have reserved religion as the one concept which is still politically correct to attack.


Dr. James Finck is a Professor of History at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma and Chair of the Oklahoma Civil War Symposium. To receive daily historical posts, follow Historically Speaking at Historicallyspeaking.blog or on Facebook.

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Is your child in middle school? Take time now to review survey being asked of our children

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URGENT Message for Parents re: 2023 Virginia School Survey of Climate & Working Conditions

Please find attached a copy of my address to the Warren County Public School Board last evening, Feb. 1, 2023. I was the ONLY public participant to address the Board and could not fully complete this message within the 3-minute limit. I politely stated that since I was the only one, could I please be able to finish? The Chair declined and said I could email them. I had the packets ready for all 5 Board members and left them with the clerk, which included:
*My address (speech)
*The letter to SMS Parents
*Superintendent’s memo #191-22
*Full survey questions (102)
*VA Code 22.1-279.8 B
*HB30 Item 135

I am a “passionate” driven individual, and I left feeling as if I failed the youth in making sure their parents were aware of this taking place, and ask you to PLEASE publish my address ASAP so parents to have still the opportunity to opt out their students if they wish to? I am aware that our SMS hasn’t taken the survey just yet, and the window is Jan. 9 – Feb. 24 (but no specific date) is being told. I, like other parents, have to make time to go online and click “links” to find out what this is all about, and some don’t have the time, but I feel if this is put out with a strong caption – they’ll be able to take notice.

Presented to the Warren County Public School Board – Feb. 1, 2023.
I am here this evening to present my concerns about the 2023 Virginia School Survey of Climate & Working Conditions that is being presented to 6th – 8th-grade students.

I am confident that this Board is aware of this survey and want to express my gratitude for receiving the parent’s letter in December from Interim Director Shamika McDonald and the school Principal providing the survey link and informing us that we will not have access to our child’s survey answers, even as parents, and gave the option to opt-out.

After reviewing the survey questions, I began a thorough online search and found the Superintendent’s Memo #191-22 from the VDOE, dated August 26, 2022.

• It states the VDOE and VA Dept of Criminal Justice Services are in partnership to coordinate the survey, which meets both VDOE’s legislative requirement and VDCJS’s mandate, but through reading the Legislative Item and the Virginia State Code listed on the memo.

• The VDOE’s legislative REQUIREMENT – Item 135-G does NOT require that students be surveyed. In fact, it makes no mention of students, only licensed personnel.

• The Virginia Code 22.1-279.8 B that the VDOE & VDCJS are using to back the “mandate” of this survey . . .is about the Virginia School and Campus Safety. It says . . . The Virginia Center for School and Campus Safety, in consultation with the Dept of Education, shall develop a list of items to be reviewed and evaluated, including incidents reported to school authorities and school inspection walk-throughs using a checklist. Each school board requires all schools to annually conduct school safety audits in collaboration with the chief law enforcement officer of the locality. Requiring a floor plan of each school building sufficiently detailed and accurate, etc.

• VA Code 22.1-279.9 C, which is not listed on the Memo, but is next in line in the VA Codes, states: the Superintendent shall establish a school safety audit committee to include representatives of parents, teachers, local law enforcement, emergency services agencies, local community service boards, and judicial and public safety personnel to review the completed safety audits and submit plans as needed to improve our schools’ safety. – Is there a Committee of such here in Warren County? What does it comprise? And is it active?

This survey is said to be a component of the annual school safety audit, and this audit itself is what is required. This survey is also said to be a tool provided by the VDOE & the DCJS to schools to help them meet their audit requirements. They claim it’s valuable information to assess student/teacher perceptions and can be used to improve school discipline and student support practices in order to maintain a safe and orderly school environment conducive to learning. I ask – has this Board looked to see if there are other possibilities out there to use instead of this survey that will help meet the audit requirements for the safety in our schools?

And the reason I ask is that this survey consists of 102 questions. It starts out positive, then takes a HUGE left turn! The following are just a few questions that are being asked of our 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade students (ages 11, 12 & 13) . . .

  • The things I learn at this school reflect multiple cultural backgrounds, ethnicities, and identities?
  • Questions 58-63 ask if students at this school are being bullied about their race or ethnicity, their sexual orientation, their physical appearance, they’re having too little or too much money or their disability.
  • Questions 81-88 – ask the student if they ever feel sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks in a row. Then ask them to rate it on a scale, then goes on to ask whether the adults in the school care about their mental health.
  • Question 90 – asks if they ever seriously considered attempted suicide in the past 12 months. If they answer yes, they get asked “how many times?” and whether they have participated in suicide prevention or mental health training.
  • Questions 98-102 asks the student to clarify themselves. How do you describe your gender? Is your ethnic background Hispanic or Latino? What best describes your race? Do you have any of the following educational plans? IEP, 504 or LEP Plan? How old are you?

This Superintendent memo states that any schools with regular education programs serving students in grades 6-8 are required to administer the student survey, but the laws they use for backing this requirement do NOT state such.

The VDOE strongly encourages schools to achieve a participation rate of 80% for both students and adults, stating that low rates may mask areas of concern and celebration. For that reason, the random sample option of the survey has been eliminated! The window dates for schools to conduct this survey is January 9 – February 24, 2023.

The Interim Director of WCPS gave parents until December 21, 2022 (right at the start of Christmas Break) to opt-out if requested. That reason alone is so the VDOE could receive back a percentile of how many students each school district is going to survey. I strongly encourage parents to make time to review this survey before your child is administered this, and should you disapprove, contact your school’s principal immediately to opt your child out.

Leslie Mathews
Warren County

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Commentary: Let’s keep the Shenandoah clean

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Paddling on the South Fork of the Shenandoah River in the George Washington National Forest. (Virginia.org)

For years, herds of cattle wading and defecating in our rivers caused pollution and rendered the waters disgusting and, in some cases, dangerous for contact by those seeking recreation and drinking water. That’s why in 2020, Virginia passed legislation providing farmers with increased funding to fence herds of cattle out of streams and a deadline of 2025 by which to complete the process. Most farmers took advantage of funding and put in exclusionary fencing, which protects public health, the health of the river, the hospitality industry, and even the cattle themselves from getting mastitis from standing in a contaminated stream.

Now, as reported in these pages, a small group of those who failed to act responsibly to put in fences using those cost-share dollars want to delay the benefits of clean water for the rest of us by extending the deadline to 2030.

This sensible legislation, passed with bipartisan support, was necessary because having cattle in our rivers and perennial streams is a trifecta of bad things. First, cattle hooves destroy the streambank and cause erosion; the resulting mud makes life difficult for critters living on the river bottom. Second, the direct deposit of cattle fecal matter in rivers adds to elevated bacteria levels. Third, the nitrogen and phosphorus from cattle manure contributes to the significant rise in algal mats we have been experiencing throughout the Shenandoah River system – dangerous enough that in 2021, more than 50 miles of the North Fork were closed to human contact because of floating mats of the stuff.

 

Algae in the North Fork of the Shenandoah in August 2021. (Matt Kowalski/Chesapeake Bay Foundation)

Those supporting an extension plead that the COVID-19 pandemic created the need for delay. However, on the Shenandoah River’s Main Stem and North and South Forks, farmers have succeeded in reducing the number of cattle herds with access to the waterways from almost 80 down to single digits; this was accomplished over a period that included the pandemic.

And the pandemic is an easy excuse – but how about evidence that it really is the basis for a needed delay? Why doesn’t the soil and water conservation district make at least a preliminary investigation to determine whether the delay is warranted? If the facts show that there has been progress but supply chain issues impeded, fair enough. But if an investigation shows nothing but inaction, we should not reward laziness with an additional delay.

Any extension is unwise and unwarranted and should not be supported. We already know that the longer cattle stay in the river, the longer the persistent problem of algae growth will go unanswered. What’s the cost of that? In addition to making the Shenandoah, one of the nation’s most attractive waterways, undesirable to be near, there is the economic impact.  River users who support the region’s considerable river outfitter economy will stay home – and who then is paying the price? The river outfitters and fishing guides. An even more dramatic and pervasive impact will result from a downturn in tourism, as those who want a day in the Valley will stay at home rather than facing the sight of disgusting mats of algae in the waters where they had wanted to wade, swim and paddle.

We also should not ignore the real health problem associated with algae in the river. In 2021, when Virginia’s Department of Health closed 50 miles of river on account of it, there were also scores of reports filed with the same authority regarding potentially dangerous algae elsewhere. Small children and pets are particularly susceptible to harm because of their enthusiasm and lack of caution; is this a worthwhile risk?

Further, the money has been allocated to support farmers to create fencing. What possibly can be gained by waiting five years when those same dollars will buy much less as a result of inflation?

To his credit, Gov. Youngkin’s current budget contains far more in agricultural cost-share dollars than any previous Virginia budget, including $81 million for Chesapeake Bay watershed cost-share best management practices, $15 million for soil and water conservation districts to provide technical assistance to farmers and $11 million to bolster operations and maintenance needs.

The Governor is also on record that Virginia will not meet the Chesapeake Bay 2025 cleanup goals, which the cattle exclusion would go some way to achieve. Pushing back the cattle herd deadline by five years will only worsen the problem. The commonwealth has no reason to sit on its hands for five years, especially when a cleaner Shenandoah River is within our sight and we have exercised the will to make it happen.

By Mark Frondorf

Mark Frondorf joined Potomac Riverkeeper Network in 2015 as the official Shenandoah Riverkeeper. Having guided on the Shenandoah and Potomac for almost twenty years, Mark Frondorf comes to the Shenandoah Riverkeeper position used to hard work and recognizing the importance of a hands-on approach to protecting our rivers. 


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Closing the Fitness Center is a poor decision – we deserve better

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Valley Health is taking away another community outreach and wellness program in order to increase the Corporation’s profit. In a letter dated Jan.16th, 2023, Valley Health’s Director of Fitness Services, Jeffery Jehren, abruptly announced that Valley Health would permanently end Front Royal’s popular fitness program, incidentally firing several trained and skilled healthcare professionals in the process.

Where are our elderly, or those of us with Parkinson’s Disease, Muscular Dystrophy, Multiple Sclerosis, and other like diseases and/or injuries, going to go to work against our declining health issues without the valuable health care benefits provided by our Fitness Center? I am 69 years old. Other local fitness centers cannot provide the same services that we are losing because of this ill-timed callous decision.

We urge you to let Valley Health know that closing the Fitness Center is a poor decision and that we deserve better treatment from our healthcare providers as a community.

Doug & Lyn Bement
Warren County

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Commentary: Credit company’s laxness jacked up my info; I got a lousy 5 bucks

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Equifax’s financial mea culpa arrived in my mailbox the other day. I eagerly tore open the envelope the credit reporting firm sent me.

Would the check be a cool $125, as the feds originally touted in helping reach the class-action settlement? Or, given the humongous number of claimants, something much, much less?

The company’s inattention to detail led to a massive data hack in 2017. The intrusion compromised the personal data of 147 million people – nearly half the U.S. population.

I had to file a claim and keep abreast of developments. It took several years for the payouts to start.

In 2019, then-Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring said that, despite knowing about a key vulnerability in its software, Equifax didn’t fully patch its system or replace software that monitored its network for suspicious activity.

I was among 4 million Virginians affected. Our names, birthdates, and Social Security numbers were imperiled, though Equifax still says there’s no proof the data “has been sold or used.”

We’ll see.

Would the settlement check let me go on a mini-shopping spree? Or could I barely afford a combo meal?

Drum roll: It was a measly $5.21.

With millions of plaintiffs, class-action lawsuits like this one usually mean individuals receive negligible amounts. Besides, the lawyers representing the class get a major cut.

A $425 million consumer restitution fund was established as part of the Equifax settlement, but the “fine print” said just $31 million was being used for reimbursements. If more than 248,000 people submitted claims – a tiny percentage of 147 million – payments would be lower than $125 to each person. Folks could opt for free credit monitoring instead.

I tried reaching Kenneth Canfield in Atlanta and Norman Siegel in Kansas City, two of the attorneys representing consumers as part of “class counsel.” I wanted to know, in part, how much they received. Neither responded to my messages by Tuesday afternoon.

A legal website noted plaintiffs’ counsel often “receives 25 to 33 percent of the amount of damages as their attorney fees.”

A spokeswoman for Equifax directed me to a company statement on the disbursements and the settlement administrator’s website.

You bet I’m cashing the check.

And cursing Equifax for its cavalier and cheap response to data security.

 

by Roger Chesley, Virginia Mercury


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Warren County Democrats candidate interest open house Saturday. January 28th

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As Chair of the Warren County Democratic Committee, I am excited to announce our Candidate Interest Open House on Saturday, January 28, from 10-2 pm at the Warren County Community Center. This event is designed to be a service to members of the community and not a closed-door, partisan exercise. The open house is not a place for rehashing political debates but one where interested parties can come in good faith to learn if the public office is right for them. One might ask why the chair of a Democratic committee would share helpful information about how to seek office without requiring party pledges.

One part of the answer is that our community is no place for the kind of partisan divisions and theatrics that hound Washington. We need problem-solvers who care about their neighbors more than any political party. That means providing this publicly available information to as many citizens of Warren County as possible. Too many people in recent years have tried to bring divisive drama to our School Board and other local offices, but that is not how we move our community forward.

Warren County has a long history of voting for Republican candidates, but whether you are a multi-generational native like myself or a newer resident, most people would agree that there is room for improvement in how local government meets the needs of business owners and working families. We can change the nature of our local governing body to reflect a more diverse set of experiences. Whether you studied law at a prestigious college, got a job at the local grocery store right out of high school, or like many, are still trying to find your passion, you might the person to bring a perspective to our local or state political system that helps kickstart a new era of vitality for the residents of Warren County.

Our community will only thrive when our School Board and Board of Supervisors are made up of people who are passionate about making our schools top-notch and ensuring that our growth is environmentally sustainable. People whose kids attend our schools should know how they can be a part of shaping educational outcomes. Folks living with the limitations of affordable housing and job opportunities can and must be part of how decisions are made for managed growth.

Even attendees of the event who do not decide to run for office can now leave with more information about the duties of their elected officials. This knowledge is important for holding our officials accountable.

Paul Miller
Chair, WCDC

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2023 Reassessment Notice – sticker shock

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Last week I checked the mail and found my 2023 Reassessment Notice from Warren County. While not a bill, the assessment change was up nearly 33%.

I took a hard swallow, even though I had been forewarned, for I had been in the audience at the January 3rd Board of Supervisors meeting when it was discussed that these reassessments, expected to show 25-35% increases in many cases, would cause sticker shock.

The BOS more or less acknowledged the need to lower the tax rate toward a level that — offsetting the assessment increases — would be “revenue-neutral” for the county.

However, I would suggest a more drastic approach. Throw out the reassessments altogether. They are based on outdated information.

While it’s unclear exactly what data was used to calculate the increases, the fact is that the real estate market peaked in May or June 2022 and has been in a precipitous decline ever since.

The reported prices used in any assessment calculation come with a serious time lag. For example, the oft-referenced Case-Schiller index is only up-to-date through October closings, which reflects contracts that were signed in the July-to-September timeframe.

Whatever selling prices were used to develop the new assessments, they were based on a roaring market and constituted prices that almost no one selling a home could get today.

Today, 30-year fixed rates are 6.15%, up from 3.45% a year ago. This rapid increase has kneecapped the housing market.

And in December, existing home sales posted the 11th straight month of declining volume.

Pending home sales are down about 35% year over year.

Days on the market (selling time) is up nearly 25%. The percentage of asking price offered to sellers is shrinking, and affordability is getting worse except for all-cash buyers.

Consider a local couple that has saved up $84K to buy a house and can afford a $1500 monthly payment (not including property taxes and insurance).

With $84K in hand, at the 3.45% interest rate a year ago, they could have bought a $420K house with 20% down.

Today, at a 6.15% rate, they can only buy a $330K house with their nest egg.

That is $90K in purchasing power lost into thin air due to rising interest rates.

Since our market is roughly balanced in terms of buyers and sellers, it means that the seller of that $420K home just lost $90K in equity. Yet Warren County sees fit to increase her assessment by 30%.

In all likelihood, anybody who thinks they can sell their house today for what it may have sold for a year ago is in for an unpleasant surprise.

Most of us would be unable to sell our homes for the newly assessed value in any reasonable amount of time, even if we wanted to.

This is why the reassessments should be scrapped altogether, or at a minimum; the increases should be cut in half to reflect the recent downturn in the market. And on top of that, the BOS should indeed lower the tax rate to offset any increase in assessments, such that the real estate tax haul for the county is revenue-neutral.

Families in Warren are paying more for food. Car taxes are up based on increased assessments. Electricity prices will likely increase as well.

A real estate tax hike based on outdated data is too much for our families to stomach.

John Stanmeyer
Warren County

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