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UPDATE: Reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 5th at the Warren County Government Center

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On July 5th at 2pm, Colonel James Wood II Chapter of the Virginia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution will read the Declaration of Independence at the Warren County Government Center. This event is open to the public.

Here is an overview of the Declaration of Independence taken from the National Park Service:

Looking back on the Declaration of Independence almost 50 years later, Thomas Jefferson explained that the document’s purpose was never meant to be thoroughly original; its purpose wasn’t to articulate anything that hadn’t been saying before but to make the case for the American colonies in plain terms and persuade the world to see common sense. “It was intended to be an expression of the American mind,” Jefferson explains. He goes on to claim that “[the Declaration’s] authority rests then on the harmonizing sentiments of the day.” (Jefferson to Henry Lee, May 8, 1825)

Jefferson finished his timeless defense of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” in little more than two weeks, and like most writers, he was no stranger to the revision process. Between the Committee of Five and the Second Continental Congress, there were 86 edits to the document. The Second Continental Congress removed whole sections. Jefferson was most angered by the removal of one particular clause, a clause blaming the King for forcing the slave trade upon the American colonies.

The final draft of the Declaration of Independence contains a preamble, a list of grievances, a formal declaration of independence, and signatures.

Preamble
This first part of the Declaration contains an assertion of individual rights. Perhaps the most famous line states, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.” This part goes on to say that if the government tries to take these rights away, the people have the right to form a new government. Jefferson also addresses a counterclaim in this section, acknowledging that “Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes…” He counters by reminding his audience of the “long train of abuses and usurpations” that makes it “…their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Grievances
The longest part of the Declaration begins with “He has refused his Assent to Laws” and goes on to list the unfair actions of the British king and Parliament. In their complaints, the colonists make it clear that they are angry with the British king and government for taking away their rights as English citizens. They point out that the king has ignored or changed their colonial governments, as well as their rights to a trial by jury. The colonists accuse the king of sending a hired army to force them to obey unjust laws. They say the king is “unfit to be the ruler of a free people.”

Note: The norms and structure of argumentative writing in the 18th century were different from they are in the 21st century. The list of grievances that serves as the Declaration’s evidence seems largely anecdotal by today’s standards. However, the Declaration’s claim and underlying assumption (big idea) are especially applicable to the writing standards of 21st-century classrooms.

A formal declaration of independence
The final paragraph, beginning with “We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America,” affirms that the 13 colonies are free and independent states. It breaks all ties with the British government and people. As independent states, they can make trade agreements and treaties, wage war, and do whatever is necessary to govern themselves. This formal declaration of independence ends with important words. The words tell us what the signers of the Declaration of Independence were willing to give up for freedom: “…we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.”

Signatures
There are 56 signatures on the Declaration of Independence. Fifty men from 13 states signed the document on August 2 in 1776. The other six signed over the course of the next year and a half. As the President of the Second Continental Congress, John Hancock signed first. He wrote his name very large. Some of the men abbreviated their first names, like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. All the signers risked their lives when they signed the Declaration of Independence.

Legacy of the argument
Contrary to popular belief, the words of the Declaration of Independence did not gain immediate prominence. In fact, they remained obscure for decades. And yet the spirit of the Declaration caused ripples almost immediately, most famously with the French Revolution in 1789. The Haitian Revolution followed soon after, and the subsequent decades would see many Latin American countries continuing the fight for independence from colonial powers. In 1945, Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh also invoked the document when declaring Vietnamese independence from the French colonial empire.

Within the U.S., the women’s suffrage movement adapted the Declaration of Independence for their cause, asserting in the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments that “all men and women are created equal.” Meanwhile, the country’s celebrations of independence haunted enslaved people and abolitionists like Frederick Douglass, whose 1852 speech “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” pondered the nation’s shortcoming despite its dedication to values like liberty. As Douglass said, “This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn.”

As World War I came to a close, leaders from Eastern Europe gathered inside Independence Hall on October 26, 1918, to sign the Declaration of Common Aims of the Independent Mid-European Nations. Those gathering in Independence Hall that day sought to bring autonomy to the nations of the former Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires. The signers pledged their mutual support and their belief that “it is the inalienable right of every people to organize their own governments on such principles and in such forms as they believe will best promote their welfare, safety, and happiness.”

After the signing ceremony, Doctor Thomas Masaryk, the first president of Czechoslovakia, read the Declaration of Common Aims on Independence Square, just as John Nixon read the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776.

Read more from the National Archives here.

Background of the Sons of the American Revolution

Chartered in 2007, Colonel James Wood, II Chapter has grown into one of the best chapters in the state of Virginia, being named the best chapter 8 times in 13 years and receiving numerous awards. Based in the Northern Shenandoah Valley, the Chapter covers a five-county area of Frederick, Clarke, Page, Warren, and Shenandoah Counties plus the City of Winchester.

The chapter continually supports the purposes of the Sons of the American Revolution which are patriotic, historical, and educational. They strive to ensure that the patriots who gave us the United States of America are not forgotten; to promote patriotism in support of our country and its modern-day heroes and; to support teaching the history and values of the American Revolution and our constitutional freedoms.

The Objects of this Society are declared to be patriotic, historical, and educational; to unite and promote fellowship among the descendants of those who sacrificed to achieve the independence of the American people, to inspire them and the community-at-large with more profound reverence for the principles of the government founded by our forefathers; to foster true patriotism; to maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom.

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This week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of August 7th

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Are you looking for the full movie-going experience without having to wait in the long lines that often accompany that experience? Then look no further because Royal Cinemas movie theatre is the answer. Get the whole gang together and enjoy a movie! We are continuing to practice “6 Foot Social Distancing” with 25% capacity reserved seating in all auditoriums.

Outdoor Main Street Movie is this Friday and Saturday at 8:50pm:

  • Friday, August 7: “The Empire Strikes Back”
  • Saturday, August 8: “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”
  • Bring your own lawn chair and enjoy the outdoors! (Weather permitting)

Here is a list of this week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of Friday, August 7:

• Daily: 3:50 & 6:30
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 55 min

• Daily: 3:40 & 6:40
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 2 hour 4 min

• Daily: 3:50 & 6:50
Rated R  |  Run Time: 2 hour 16 min


COVID-19 Throwbacks Ticket Prices: All Seats $3.00


Other movies coming soon to Royal Cinemas:

  • “RoboCop”
  • “Footloose”
  • “The Greatest Showman”
  • “Singing in the Rain”
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Coming to the Table video conversation and invitation to virtual gathering on Thursday, July 30

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WHAT MATTERS Warren–The community is invited to watch the virtual healing discussion shared below and to attend the Coming to the Table (Northern Shenandoah Valley Chapter) ZOOM virtual gathering on Thursday, 7/30, from 6:30pm-8:30pm. The group’s mission is to promote “truth, justice, healing and working together to create a just and truthful society that acknowledges and seeks to heal from the racial wounds of the past, from slavery and the many forms of racism it spawned.” CTTT encourages all to be willing to be uncomfortable, willing to learn and step out of comfort zones, to make time to become educated and to engage in healing as well as transforming conversations in a safe space.

This video is a thought provoking ZOOM discussion between Beth Medved Waller, Judith James and Ira Chaleff (co-chairs) as well as Sarah Downs, a Reaching Out Now Volunteer and Shenandoah University student. During the conversation, a powerful theory that “pain that is not transformed is transferred” and “hurt people hurt people” is presented as well as the concepts of forgiveness, inclusion, respect, honesty, transparency, compassion, reconciliation and using non-violence to bridge the divide through love and peace.

According to the CTTT Facebook page, “Our goal is to provide leadership, resources, and a supportive environment for all who wish to acknowledge and heal wound from racism that is rooted in the United States’ history of slavery and, unfortunately, is ongoing.

The essential element that is needed for us to do the work of healing is to have blacks, whites, and others well represented. Toward that end, PLEASE REACH OUT TO FAMILY MEMBERS, FRIENDS, NEIGHBORS, FELLOW PARISHIONERS, STUDENTS AND CO-WORKERS – BLACK AND WHITE – AND EXTEND AN INVITATION TO THIS WORK. THE MORE DIVERSE OUR GROUP, THE RICHER WILL BE THE CONVERSATION” Learn more at comingtothetable.org/front-royal, and contact them at ctttfrontroyal@gmail.com or on Facebook to receive the ZOOM link and/or to sign up for their mailing list.

WHAT TO EXPECT DURING MEETINGS–During the gatherings (in person or ZOOM), attendees do not need to speak but are encouraged to share, make connections, discuss history, brainstorm about paths to healing, express and challenge hard truths in a safe space without shame, listen thoughtfully and take action they feel called to take. As volunteer Sarah Downs shares, people don’t have to feel obligated to speak–healing is fostered when people who are hurt are heard.


WHAT MATTERS INITIATIVE

Are you or your group in need of a free video that could be created to help market your cause or event? Beth’s WHAT MATTERS Warren videos post on Facebook and YouTube.

Learn more Beth’s nonprofit, WHAT MATTERS, a 501 (c) (3), at www.whatmattersw2.com – check out the “Community” section to request a TOWN TIP or WHAT MATTERS WARREN BETHvid or contact her at 540-671-6145 or beth@whatmattersw2.com.


About WHAT MATTERS:

WHAT MATTERS is a 501(c)(3) that focuses on local and global outreach to help spread the word, support and raise funds for causes that matter (primarily through Facebook). WHAT MATTERS has ZERO overhead as 100% of the expenses are funded by Beth’s real estate business thanks to her clients and supporters. Every cent raised goes to the cause she’s promoting and most are matched by Beth. If you’d like to get involved or travel to Africa with her on a future trip to work with the children of Light up Life Foundations, please visit www.whatmattersw2.com.

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This week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of July 31st

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Are you looking for the full movie-going experience without having to wait in the long lines that often accompany that experience? Then look no further because Royal Cinemas movie theatre is the answer. Get the whole gang together and enjoy a movie! We are continuing to practice “6 Foot Social Distancing” with 25% capacity reserved seating in all auditoriums.

Outdoor Main Street Movie is this Friday and Saturday at 8:50pm:

  • Friday, July 31: “The Notebook”
  • Saturday, August 1: “Pitch Perfect”
  • Bring your own lawn chair and enjoy the outdoors! (Weather permitting)

Here is a list of this week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of Friday, July 31:

• Daily: 3:40 & 6:40
Rated PG13  |  Run Time: 1 hour 52 min

• Daily: 3:30 & 6:30
Rated PG13  |  Run Time: 2 hours

• Daily: 3:50 & 6:50
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 45 min


COVID-19 Throwbacks Ticket Prices: All Seats $3.00


Other movies coming soon to Royal Cinemas:

  • “The Breakfast Club”
  • “Footloose”
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Northwestern Prevention Collaborative’s Faith Based Web Series: Highlighting the intersection of trauma and substance misuse

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In the third installment of their virtual Faith Based Series, the Northwestern Prevention Collaborative will be highlighting the intersection of trauma and substance misuse. The training will be led by Robin Blumenthal, an ACEs, Trauma, and Brain Development educator within the faith community, and a Children’s and Family Pastor of 28 years. Topics covered will include the general relationship between trauma and substance misuse, youth ministry, and the impact of trauma on interactions within faith communities.

The August meeting will follow two successful webinars held in June and July. The first two parts of the series included a discussion on stress and anxiety and a conversation on suicide, both in the context of substance misuse and COVID-19. By offering information on relevant issues and creating space for dialogue, the Collaborative hopes to give faith leaders additional tools to utilize in their service of their communities.  Recordings of the previous sessions can be viewed on the Collaborative’s YouTube channel.

The webinar will take place on Tuesday, August 4th from 10:00-11:30am. Community members interested in attending can use THIS LINK to register. In keeping with their belief that everyone has a role in addressing the opioid epidemic, the Collaborative is excited to bring together leaders within the faith community for a morning of learning and collaboration.


About Northwestern Prevention Collaborative

The Northwestern Prevention Collaborative covers the Lord Fairfax Planning District, encompassing the City of Winchester and the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren. One of their current areas of focus is on opioids, with dual goals of preventing young people from misusing prescription drugs and reducing the number of heroin/prescription drug overdose deaths. The Collaborative is a partnership between Page Alliance for Community Action, Family Youth Initiative, Warren Coalition and the Prevention Department of Northwestern Community Services and is funded, in part, through the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services.

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Northwestern Prevention Collaborative offering free online training on how to administer the opioid overdose reversal drug

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The Northwestern Prevention Collaborative in collaboration with Northwestern Community Services Board is sponsoring online trainings that teach people how to administer naloxone (the drug that reverses an overdose of opiates) and provides naloxone free of charge to participants who complete the online course. The training is being offered beginning at 12 noon, on July 31st or August 28th. There is a rapid REVIVE training which will last 20 minutes or a longer more in-depth version that provides information on why overdoses happen and risk factors that contribute to overdoses which will end by 1:30. Participants must preregister for the training ONLINE.

The Center for Disease Control just listed its preliminary numbers for overdose deaths in the US for 2019 at 70,980 an increase of 4.8% over 2018. In Virginia, the fatality rate increased 7.5% from 2018 rates. So far this year there have been 18 fatal overdoses in Page, Shenandoah, and Warren Counties through July 21st. This compares to a total of 11 for all of last year for the three counties according to reports from the Northwest Virginia Regional Drug and Gang Task Force. Nonfatal overdoses have increased significantly as well.

Please take advantage of the free training and dose of naloxone particularly if there are pain medications in the home.


About Northwestern Prevention Collaborative

The Northwestern Prevention Collaborative is focusing on the heroin/opioid epidemic in the Lord Fairfax Planning District, encompassing the City of Winchester and the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Page, Shenandoah and Warren with dual goals of preventing young people from misusing prescription drugs and reducing the number of heroin/prescription drug overdose deaths. The Collaborative is a partnership between Page Alliance for Community Action, Family Youth Initiative, Warren Coalition and the Prevention Department of Northwestern Community Services and is funded through the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services.

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Virtual children activities by Samuels Public Library for the month of August

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These are the virtual events that are being hosted by the Youth Services Department at Samuels Public Library for the month of August.  Most events can be viewed from the Samuels Library Facebook page or YouTube channel.  More information about Samuels Library and the programs and services available can be found at www.samuelslibrary.net or call (540) 635-3153.

Children, teens, and adults are challenged to Dig Deeper:  Read.  Investigate.  Discover.  Samuels Library’s Summer Reading Clubs have begun, and readers are invited to register for Summer Reading Club, log their books read, complete challenges, attend virtual programs, and collect badges online.  Then come to the library for your prizes!  Summer Reading Club continues through August 10.


Tuesday, August 4

  • 2:00 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  This week we will investigate chemical reactions as we make elephant toothpaste.  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, August 5

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  Author June Smalls will have a special reading of her children’s book, Odd Animal ABCs, just for Samuels Library patrons!
  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, August 6

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  Author June Smalls will have a special reading of her children’s book, She Leads, just for Samuels Library patrons!

Monday, August 10

  • 2:00 Virtual Symphony of Sound.  This series of programs explores many sounds, including sounds found in nature and the science of sound as well as musical instruments. Children will be able to explore many kinds of sounds and reflect creatively on them as well as create their own sounds via crafts.  This week we will explore the brass family of instruments.  Intended for ages 6 – 11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Tuesday, August 11

  • 4:30 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  Learn how to make a maze, using magnets!   Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, August 12

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, August 13

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  What’s new?  Join Miss Pattie for story time as she reads some of the library’s new books!  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Saturday, August 15

  • 2:00 Virtual Discuss This.  Join Ms. Michal for a virtual teen discussion group.  Are you inspired by good books, articles, movies, and art? Do you write, draw, or enjoy playing music? If so, join us as we discuss books and share our creations. This is a group for those who wish to talk seriously about a variety of topics.  Sign up in advance to participate on a platform to be determined.  For ages 12-18.

Tuesday, August 18

  • 4:30 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  How do you make a balloon walk?  Find out during our time today, as we learn more about friction.  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, August 19

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, August 20

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  What’s cooking?  We’ll have some fun stories that feature food and the kitchen during this week’s story time.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Saturday, August 22

  • 11:00 Virtual Aspiring Artists.  Are you aged 7 or older?  Do you enjoy art?  If so, please join us for our children’s art class.  This month we will learn about the art of Vincent Van Gogh, and recreate his iconic painting, Starry Night.  You can watch this program on the Samuels Library Facebook page or YouTube channel.

Monday, August 24

  • 4:30 Virtual Symphony of Sound.  This series of programs explores many sounds, including sounds found in nature and the science of sound as well as musical instruments. Children will be able to explore many kinds of sounds and reflect creatively on them as well as create their own sounds via crafts.  This week, join us for a musical story time:  Peter and the Wolf!  Intended for ages 5 – 11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Tuesday, August 25

  • 4:30 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.   Learn how to make water move using capillary action.  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, August 26

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, August 27

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time. There are so many to choose from, but what is your favorite?  This week our stories will be about favorite colors.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Friday, August 28

  • 2:00 Little House Lore.  Do you the love the Little House books?  Or, would you like an introduction to those books?  In this program, we’ll dig deeper into some fun aspects of the series by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Monday, August 31

  • 2:00 Virginia Fossil Finds.  Did you know that Thomas Jefferson named a fossil?  Do you know the best places to find fossilized shark teeth?  What are trace fossils?  Join Ms. Michal for a discussion and show-and-tell of fossils that are native to Virginia.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.
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