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6 components of integrated pest management

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Overuse of chemical pesticides has led to issues like pesticide resistance, outbreaks of previously suppressed pests and environmental contamination. Integrated pest management (IPM) evolved as a response to these problems.

Here are the six components of IPM and how each of them helps make pest control more sustainable.

1. Prevention

Preventing pest problems eliminates the need to take further action. For instance, storing wood in a dry place off the ground prevents carpenter ants from taking up residence near crops.

Such measures may also mitigate the severity of any pest problems that do arise, which means less money spent on potentially harmful pesticides.

2. Identification
Because IPM relies on sustainable measures that target specific pests, it’s important to clearly identify the cause of an emerging problem.

Using broad-spectrum pesticides may be quicker, but in addition to causing problems down the line, they’re unlikely to be effective.

3. Monitoring
Many IPM techniques rely on timing. Knowing when a pest’s natural predators are more active makes complementary control methods more effective.

Regular inspections also let you know when a pest population is growing and where nests are located.

In cases where chemical pesticides are needed, close monitoring will increase their efficiency.

4. Assessment
You may not always need to take action against pests. For instance, clover is considered a pest by some growers, but others appreciate the plant’s contributions to soil fertility. Determining your damage threshold makes resource management easier.

5. Planning
IPM relies on synchronizing various methods of pest control, including:

• Cultural preventive methods such as introducing resistant varieties, pruning strategically and altering plant nutrition

• Physical methods such as putting up barriers, placing screens and using mulches

• Biological controls such as introducing beneficial organisms, predatory species and microbial controls

• Pesticides chosen for compatibility with other methods

The best strategy largely depends on the particular type of pest you’re dealing with.

6. Evaluation
Follow-up monitoring is a crucial part of pest management. Identify what worked and what didn’t and keep records for future reference.

Adopting sustainable pest control methods is a good way to avoid pesticide overuse as well as inefficient resource usage.

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3 reasons to visit a barber

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Have you ever wondered what it would be like to sit in a barber’s chair and get an old-fashioned hair cut? Here are three good reasons to give it a try.

1. Superior style
A good barber is a true expert and will make sure to trim your hair and beard so that the style suits your build and features perfectly. By going to a pro, you’ll avoid razor burn, nicks and uneven cuts.

2. Professional advice
Visiting a barber also means getting professional advice. Whatever style you opt for, they’ll be able to tell you how you should brush, moisturize and maintain your hair. If you’re trying to fix a patchy beard, your barber can give you some tips to stimulate growth or better style your facial hair.

3. A range of services
Don’t underestimate the importance of an eyebrow trim. It can structure your features and complete your look. Some barber shops also offer skin care, massages and other services.

Finally, remember that barber shops often sell specialized, hard-to-find products to help you maintain your hair and beard. Don’t hesitate to ask them if they have the product you’re looking for.

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Boredom can be a good thing

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When we were younger and complained of being bored, our parents told us to go outside and play. Find something to do. Figure it out.

Now? Many of us grab our phones to text a friend, check email, see how many Likes we got on our latest photo. And boredom is averted.

But is that a good thing? Probably not.

Boredom and its oft-related cousin, daydreaming, may serve a very important purpose in our brain, allowing it to rest while also sorting out the thornier issues of our lives. Creativity is born from mind-wandering, and it’s not just the artsy kind — engineers and tech folks can find solutions when they loosen their hold.

A recent story on Medium pointed out that most of the studies on the neuroscience of daydreaming have only been done within the past 10 years. But those studies have been enlightening.

When our brains wander, neuroscientists discovered, they use the “default mode.” Brain-imaging technology has found that the brain is still extraordinarily active in this mode, however. The medial temporal lobe, medial prefrontal cortex, and the posterior cingulate cortex are active.

For the non-neuroscientists among us, that means our organizing and understanding of things is hard at work. Reflection, which leads to insight, can better take place.

It’s why we step away from the laptop and get an ah-ha moment when out for a walk, or wake up in the morning with fresh ideas (albeit after a cup or two of coffee).

So maybe the next time we hear that cringeworthy, “I’m booored” from the next room, we can smile and think, “Good.”

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November Celebrity Birthdays!

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Dan Marsh [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]

Do you share a birthday with a celebrity?

1 – Penn Badgley, 33, actor, Baltimore, MD, 1986.

2 – Shere Hite, 77, researcher on sexual behavior, St. Joseph, MO, 1942.

3 – Kendall Jenner, 24, television personality, Los Angeles, CA, 1995.

4 – Markie Post, 69, actress (Chicago P.D.), Palo Alto, CA, 1950.

5 – Kevin Jonas, 32, singer, Teaneck, NJ, 1987.

6 – Sally Field, 73, actress, Pasadena, CA, 1946.

7 – Lorde, 23, singer, born Ella Marija Lani Yelich-O’Connor, Takapuna, New Zealand, 1996.

8 – Norman Lloyd, 105, actor (St. Elsewhere), director, Jersey City, NJ, 1914.

9 – Nikki Blonsky, 31, actress (Hairspray), Great Neck, NY, 1988.

10 – Hugh Bonneville, 56, actor (Downton Abbey), London, England, 1963.

11 – Jon Batiste, 33, musician, Kenner, LA, 1986.

12 – Neil Young, 74, singer, Toronto, ON, Canada, 1945.

13 – Dana Vollmer, 32, Olympic swimmer, Syracuse, NY, 1987.

14 – Prince Charles, 71, Prince of Wales, heir to the British throne, London, England, 1948.

15 – Karl-Anthony Towns, 24, basketball player, Edison, NJ, 1995.

16 – Lisa Bonet, 52, actress (The Cosby Show), San Francisco, CA, 1967.

17 – Rachel McAdams, 41, actress (Sherlock Holmes), London, ON, Canada, 1978.

18 – Brenda Vaccaro, 80, actress (The Goodbye People), Brooklyn, NY, 1939.

19 – Patrick Kane, 31, hockey player, Buffalo, NY, 1988.

20 – Estelle Parsons, 92, actress (Oscar for Bonnie and Clyde), Marblehead, MA, 1927.

21 – Carly Rae Jepsen, 34, singer, Mission, BC, Canada, 1985.

22 – Guion S. Bluford, Jr, 77, astronaut, West Philadelphia, PA, 1942.

23 – Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, 32, television personality, Santiago, Chile, 1987.

24 – Brad Sherwood, 55, comedian, actor (Whose Line Is It Anyway?), Chicago, IL, 1964.

25 – Katie Cassidy, 33, actress (Melrose Place), Los Angeles, CA, 1986.

26 – Tina Turner, 81, singer, Anna Mae Bullock, Nutbush, TN, 1938.

27 – Jaleel White, 43, actor (Family Matters), Los Angeles, CA, 1976.

28 – Berry Gordy, Jr, 90, record and motion picture executive (cofounder of Motown), Detroit, MI, 1929.

29 – Lucas Black, 37, actor (NCIS: New Orleans), Speake, AL, 1982.

30 – Joan Ganz Cooney, 90, creator of Sesame Street, Phoenix, AZ, 1929.

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Honoring Native American veterans

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The US Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Virginia.

Native Americans have a long history of serving in our military. Since the Civil War, they’ve taken part in armed conflicts as U.S. soldiers. In fact, the terms of surrender between the North and South were written by Ely S. Parker, one of two American Indians to reach the rank of brigadier general during the Civil War.

Earlier this year, the United States Government announced the construction of a $15 million memorial celebrating Native American service members and veterans in Washington, D.C. In honor of Veterans Day on November 11, here are some of their achievements.

World War II

As many as 44,000 Native Americans joined the military during World War II. They saw their first engagement in the Pacific Theater and were involved in many critical battles. Notably, they fought at Iwo Jima, where the iconic picture of native soldier, Ira Hayes, raising the American flag with four of his fellow soldiers, was taken.

In addition, Native American code talkers played a crucial role in the war effort. Native soldiers formed telephone squads and together they used their native languages to craft coded messages. In fact, the United States asked soldiers from a variety of tribes to develop secret combat communication systems. Their codes were never broken.

Today
Over 31,000 Native Americans serve in the Armed Forces today. They continue to be active in the military, serving all around the world.

After 9/11, a large number of newly enrolled soldiers were Native Americans.

Approximately 140,000 veterans alive today are Native American.

This Veterans Day, take a moment to remember the long-standing involvement of Native Americans in our nation’s military history.

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The vet of tomorrow: no longer white and male

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As the U.S. military undergoes significant demographic shifts, so too does the veteran population. In honor of Veterans Day, celebrated every year on November 11, here are some facts about the future of American veterans.

More veterans are women
According to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the proportion of female veterans will almost double by 2043, from nine percent to 17 percent. In the wake of increased enrollment following the events of 9/11, women are actually the fastest growing group of veterans. They face particular challenges when trying to adjust to civilian life, many of which aren’t addressed by existing resources.

The average age of veterans is changing
Currently, people aged 50 to 69 make up 42 percent of the veteran population. By 2043, however, the proportion of veterans under the age of 50 will increase considerably, as will the number of those over the age of 70. This means that the services offered to veterans will need to accommodate the needs of a more diverse population in terms of age.

Veterans are becoming more ethnically diverse
As the U.S. military becomes more diverse, it’s expected that the veteran population will exhibit the same trend. The proportion of non-Hispanic white veterans is likely to fall to 64 percent in 2043 from 78 percent in 2013.

Since non-White veterans are disproportionately affected by issues such as homelessness and lack of access to resources, it’ll be important for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs to work with community leaders to help ensure their well-being.

Veterans of all genders, ages and ethnicity have sacrificed a lot to keep our country safe. On November 11, take a moment to thank them for their service.

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9 myths about hospice and palliative care debunked

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In recognition of National Hospice and Palliative Care Month, here are 9 myths about these two types of medical care.

1. Myth: Hospice and palliative care are exclusively about controlling pain.
Fact: While pain management is an important aspect of palliative and hospice care, treatment programs also include psychological, social, practical and spiritual support.

2. Myth: My condition isn’t serious enough to warrant palliative care.
Fact: Palliative care isn’t just for those facing a terminal diagnosis. Most people with life-limiting illnesses can benefit from it.

3. Myth: My doctor hasn’t recommended hospice or palliative care, so I don’t need it.
Fact: Patients who think they might benefit from hospice or palliative care should bring up the topic with their doctor.

4. Myth: I can’t access palliative care without a hospice.
Fact: Palliative care can be provided at home, in the hospital, at a hospice and in long-term care facilities.

5. Myth: If I receive palliative care, it means my life is over.
Fact: The goal of palliative care is to improve patients’ quality of life during every stage of their disease. Many continue to receive curative treatment in conjunction with palliative care.

6. Myth: I’m too young for hospice and/or palliative care.
Fact: People of all ages can benefit from hospice and palliative care.

7. Myth: I shouldn’t talk about dying with my loved ones — it’s too upsetting.
Fact: Addressing your end of life wishes and any advanced medical directives will save your loved ones a lot of stress and uncertainty down the road.

8. Myth: Palliative care is only for people who are at the end of their life.
Fact: This type of care can help patients from the time they’re diagnosed right up till the very end.

9. Myth: Children don’t need hospice or palliative care.
Fact: Palliative and hospice care are given on the basis of need. Everyone should receive the care appropriate for their condition, age and level of understanding.

Dealing with a chronic or terminal illness is challenging, but you don’t have to go through it alone. Hospice and palliative care are available and can provide you with the physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual help you require to manage your disease.

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‘Tis the Season

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Front Royal
42°
Fog
07:0016:56 EST
Feels like: 41°F
Wind: 3mph S
Humidity: 89%
Pressure: 29.84"Hg
UV index: 0
TueWedThu
52/36°F
51/30°F
54/43°F

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Upcoming Events

Nov
19
Tue
1:30 pm Botanical Drawing II: Drawing in... @ Art in the Valley
Botanical Drawing II: Drawing in... @ Art in the Valley
Nov 19 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Botanical Drawing II: Drawing in Color @ Art in the Valley
Learn and practice the art of botanical drawing in colored pencil with local artist and instructor Elena Maza. This four week course will focus on continuing to build drawing skills as applied to botanicals: students[...]
4:30 pm Science Scouts and More @ Samuels Public Library
Science Scouts and More @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 19 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Science Scouts and More @ Samuels Public Library
Tuesday, November 5: Kids will explore popular books and book series through science, games, food, and more! Based on the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, we will do some taffy pulling and have a[...]
Nov
20
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 20 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, November 6 and Thursday, November 7: It’s playtime! Come in for stories, songs, and a craft about our favorite toys, games, and imaginings! Siblings welcome.[...]
1:30 pm Botanicals in Watercolor I @ Art in the Valley
Botanicals in Watercolor I @ Art in the Valley
Nov 20 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Botanicals in Watercolor I @ Art in the Valley
This four week course with instructor, Elena Maza, will deal with the basic three-primary color palette, different pigments and how they interact, how to mix all colors from three primary colors, how to apply washes,[...]
7:00 pm Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Nov 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Drama Performance: "Loserville" @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
On Wednesday, November 20th, and Thursday, November 21st, Randolph-Macon Academy’s Performing Arts Department will present its 2019 fall production of Elliot Davis’ and James Bourne’s musical, Loserville. The musical, which will take place in Melton[...]
Nov
21
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 21 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, November 6 and Thursday, November 7: It’s playtime! Come in for stories, songs, and a craft about our favorite toys, games, and imaginings! Siblings welcome.[...]
7:00 pm Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Drama Performance: “Loserville” @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
Nov 21 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Drama Performance: "Loserville" @ Melton Memorial Gymnasium | R-MA
On Wednesday, November 20th, and Thursday, November 21st, Randolph-Macon Academy’s Performing Arts Department will present its 2019 fall production of Elliot Davis’ and James Bourne’s musical, Loserville. The musical, which will take place in Melton[...]
Nov
22
Fri
9:00 am Veteran Services Visit @ Able Forces Professional Services
Veteran Services Visit @ Able Forces Professional Services
Nov 22 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Veteran Services Visit @ Able Forces Professional Services
Able Forces will once again be hosting a visit by Andre Miller, Resource Specialist, Virginia Veteran and Family Support, Department of Veteran Services, Commonwealth of Virginia this Friday 22 November from 9AM to Noon. As[...]
Nov
23
Sat
10:30 am Children’s Class: Drawing A Self... @ Art in the Valley
Children’s Class: Drawing A Self... @ Art in the Valley
Nov 23 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Children's Class: Drawing A Self Portrait @ Art in the Valley
In this class students will learn how to draw facial features and the proportions used for placement of features on a face.  They will complete a self portrait using graphite. Classes are designed for the[...]
2:30 pm The Princess & the “P___” @ Samuels Public Library
The Princess & the “P___” @ Samuels Public Library
Nov 23 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
The Princess & the “P___” @ Samuels Public Library
Lyla sees no purpose to princes. They’re ugly, stupid—and obnoxious! Why can’t Hagabah see that, and why must the master insist that she keep the prince around three more days? The world would be a[...]