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Attorney General Herring holds gas station accountable for price gouging

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RICHMOND (November 17, 2021) – Attorney General Mark R. Herring is holding Richmond-based 7HC Inc. d/b/a 7 Heaven BP accountable for alleged violations of the Virginia Post-Disaster Anti-Price Gouging Act. The agreement relates to allegations that the gas station on Williamsburg Road in Richmond charged unconscionable prices on gasoline, a necessary good, after Governor Northam declared a state of emergency on May 11, 2021, in response to a temporary shutdown of the Colonial Pipeline, which supplies motor fuels and other petroleum-based products to a large portion of the east coast.

This is the third enforcement action Attorney General Herring has taken regarding price gouging following the Colonial Pipeline emergency. Additionally, he has taken enforcement actions against price gouging in relation to the state of emergency declaration in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It’s unfortunate that bad actors will take advantage of emergencies, natural disasters, or other times of crisis just to line their own pockets,” said Attorney General Herring. “My Consumer Protection Section has been committed to pursuing and investigating allegations of possible price gouging, and we will continue to take action against those businesses that have preyed on consumers and overcharged during an emergency. Virginians should never have to worry about paying too much for gas and other necessary goods during a crisis when they are focused on taking care of themselves and their families.”

Attorney General Herring’s complaint alleges that, during the ten days immediately preceding the Governor’s emergency declaration, the gas station was charging $2.649 per gallon for regular unleaded fuel, $3.199 per gallon for plus (midgrade) fuel, and $3.549 per gallon for premium unleaded fuel. Then, in the evening of May 11, immediately after the state of emergency was declared, the business elevated its prices on all grades of gallons of gasoline several times – eventually topping out at $6.99 per gallon on regular and premium gasoline. A violation of Virginia’s price gouging law is also a violation of the Virginia Consumer Protection Act.


Under the terms of the settlement, 7 Heaven BP agrees to be enjoined from engaging in further violations of Virginia’s price gouging law and the Virginia Consumer Protection Act. The business also has agreed to pay $2,000 in attorneys’ fees and has distributed $2,858.70 in refunds to 152 consumers through credit card reimbursements and direct cash refunds. Consumers who purchased gasoline from 7 Heaven BP on May 11, and who have not received a refund, should file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Section. Complaints should include documentation of the purchase and be submitted to the Attorney General’s Office by no later than February 22, 2022.

The settlement, in the form of an Assurance of Voluntary Compliance, has been filed for approval with the Richmond City Circuit Court.

During Governor Northam’s state of emergency that was issued in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Virginia Attorney General’s Office received more than 500 complaints and e-mails alleging possible price gouging activity and sent more than 150 investigative letters to businesses. Investigation of these complaints largely revealed that many price increases occurred further up the supply chain with manufacturers or distributors that were beyond the reach of the state’s price gouging laws, and this prompted Attorney General Herring to successfully seek amendments to the state’s price gouging law during the 2020 General Assembly special session.

Additionally, in April 2020, Attorney General Herring led a national effort to address price gouging in the PPE supply chain, urging 3M as one of the largest manufacturers of PPE, particularly masks, to do more to address price gouging within its supply and distribution chains that were causing hospitals and healthcare providers to pay exorbitant prices for PPE.

If a Virginia consumer suspects they are a victim of price gouging, they can call the Consumer Protection Hotline or download a complaint form from the Attorney General’s website and submit it in-person, by mail, or by fax. Consumers are encouraged to keep any relevant documentation and submit copies with their complaints. If consumers believe they are a victim of price gouging specific to motor fuel they should file complaints with the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Consumers can contact Attorney General Herring’s Consumer Protection Section for information or file a complaint:
• By phone: (800) 552-9963
• By email: consumer@oag.state.va.us
Online Contact Form/Online Complaint Form

 

 

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Two former election officials file federal lawsuits against Nottoway County

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Nottoway County’s former election registrar and one of her assistants have filed separate federal lawsuits claiming they were wrongfully fired from the elections office last year and should be reinstated to their old jobs.

The pair of suits, which both name several county boards and local officials as defendants, were filed last week by Angela Stewart, who served as the county’s registrar for nearly three decades until she was terminated almost exactly one year ago, and Sharon Caldwell, a longtime Nottoway officer of election who served as an assistant registrar for two years.

The lawsuits — which include claims of due process violations, wrongful termination, free-speech violations, and defamation — are the latest development in a long-running fight over the rural county’s elections office. With two factions lodging broad accusations of skullduggery and illegality against each other, the litigation could shed more light on who has the law on their side.

The county has not yet filed a formal response, but an attorney said Nottoway expects the claims to be dismissed.


“The lawsuits have no merit, factually or legally, for many reasons,” said Andrew McRoberts of the Richmond-based Sands Anderson law firm.

In addition to asking the courts to give them their positions back, Stewart and Caldwell are both seeking back pay and damages. The two women have retained the same law firm for the litigation, Roanoke-based Williams & Strickler. Their attorneys declined to comment.

Under Virginia law, city and county election registrars answer to three-member boards controlled by whichever political party won the most recent gubernatorial election. Those boards, made up of local party activists selected by judges, are supposed to operate in a nonpartisan manner. But some election officials feel the state needs stronger laws to protect registrars from being fired for specious or political reasons, arguing the current system makes registrars susceptible to pressure from the party in power.

The court filings claim the Democratic-controlled Nottoway Electoral Board fired Stewart and Caldwell without sufficient proof they had failed to carry out their duties according to state law. The lawsuits also insist various local figures falsely accused Stewart and Caldwell of wrongdoing to support their termination.

Democratic members of the Nottoway Electoral Board have portrayed Stewart’s firing as justified and have defended the person hired to replace her, current Registrar Rodney Reynolds, against a backlash they say is unfounded and driven largely by Republican activists.

Stewart says she was given no “meaningful opportunity” to defend herself before last year’s meeting, where the board unanimously voted to remove her. She claims that the meeting violated state transparency laws because the agenda gave no notice the board would consider a vote to fire her.

The suit says Stewart was only served with a notice on the night of the meeting, and its official justification for her firing was inaccurate. The notice said Stewart had failed to post information about early voting locations in the county and failed to “apply for grant funding for Sunday voting in a manner that would permit the electoral board to adequately prepare for the upcoming election,” according to court records. Stewart says she posted the legally required notices of all voting locations and contends any dispute over how to handle Sunday voting can’t legally justify her firing.

Caldwell’s complaint is similar, claiming her removal was also unlawful because she didn’t violate her duties as an assistant registrar and election officer.

The defendants named in Stewart’s lawsuit are the county general, the Nottoway Board of Supervisors, the Nottoway Electoral Board and its members, and Nottoway Democratic Committee Chairman Thomas Crews, and Nottoway Supervisor John Roark.

The suit claims Roark attended a closed session of the Nottoway Electoral Board as Stewart’s job was being discussed and “has boasted that he played a role in the removal.”

Stewart’s complaint accuses Crews of spreading “false and defamatory” information about Stewart by claiming she created a bogus certificate of election for an unnamed Nottoway official. Crews declined to comment.

Early voting for the midterm elections began last week, but it’s highly unlikely the Nottoway lawsuits could advance fast enough to cause another leadership change in the county elections office before Nov. 8.

In 2019, when Democrats controlled all local electoral boards, the General Assembly passed a Republican-sponsored bill that would’ve given courts the final authority to decide when a registrar should be removed from office. At the time, supporters argued it would insulate registrars from political pressure.

Former Gov. Ralph Northam vetoed the bill, saying that “Virginia law already provides specific circumstances in which a registrar can be removed” and creating a lengthier court process would make it difficult to get rid of registrars who might be “egregiously breaking the law.”

“This legislation has far too many unintended consequences,” Northam wrote in his veto message.

by Graham Moomaw, Virginia Mercury


 

Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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As early voting starts, Youngkin’s elections commissioner calls system ‘dependable’

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Virginia Elections Commissioner Susan Beals checks in at the Chesterfield County elections office on the first day of early voting. (Photo by Graham Moomaw/Virginia Mercury)

 

As a woman in a purple blazer lined up to cast a ballot on the first day of early voting in Chesterfield County, one election worker nudged another and said: “She’s the boss.”

It took less than 10 minutes for Susan Beals, Virginia’s new commissioner of elections, to vote early in Chesterfield, the Richmond-area suburb where she served as a local electoral board member before Gov. Glenn Youngkin appointed her to the state’s top election job.

There were no problems as she showed her ID, had a ballot made in front of her by one of the on-demand ballot printers many cities and counties are adopting for early voting, filled it out, and fed it into a scanner as one of the first few dozen midterm votes cast in her home county.


While a significant number of her fellow Republicans continue to stoke doubts about the 2020 election, Beals, a 47-year-old former GOP aide, said in an interview she’s confident in the election process she’s overseeing at the state level for the first time.

“We have a dependable system in Virginia,” said Beals. “We can always make process improvements, and that’s something that I’m committed to.”

Beals said “people are entitled to have questions” about the process, but the answers are readily available.

“Find somebody who knows the answer,” she said. “Seek out an election official and ask them how the process works. Because most of them would be very happy to tell you.”

Beals, who served on the Chesterfield electoral board for several years before Youngkin picked her in March to lead the state agency, has had other important business on her plate that doesn’t involve actual voting, like taking over an ongoing information technology project to replace the state’s voter system. She’s also been preparing an outreach campaign to inform voters about the impacts of redistricting, an initiative that will involve roughly 6 million voter notices that should hit mailboxes early this week.

But the start of the 45-day early voting window on Friday, in a year when Virginia will have at least two hotly contested congressional races on the ballot, will cast a new spotlight on how Youngkin’s administration will handle the work of running elections.

Beals praised the thousands of election officers across Virginia who are getting to work helping people vote, calling them “patriotic Americans” who are “committed to making democracy work.” Asked if she believes those sowing mistrust about elections is making that job harder, Beals said, “there’s a lot of scrutiny of elections right now.”

“But everything I have seen from election officials is that they are conducting themselves professionally,” she said. “I have faith in our election officials and their commitment to their profession and their commitment to their communities.”

Asked how she feels about the “election integrity” unit Attorney General Jason Miyares recently announced, which has drawn backlash from Democrats who say it feeds into conspiracy theorizing about stolen elections, Beals characterized it as fairly routine.

“To me, that’s a normal relationship that we have,” she said. “They provide advice. If there is something that needs to be investigated, our board will vote to turn it over to the AG and ask them to investigate it.”

Virginia Republicans failed to repeal or scale back voting reforms Democrats passed two years ago when they had full political control, meaning the 45-day early voting window and the law-making photo IDs optional will still be in place for Virginia’s midterms.

The major change to state election policy this year is same-day registration, a policy Democrats passed in 2020 with a delayed effective date of October 2022. The new policy allows people to continue to register and cast a provisional ballot after the regular voter registration period closes on Oct. 17.

Beals said she’s not encouraging potential voters to put things off to take advantage of that new law because registering in advance remains the easiest voting experience. Anyone casting a provisional ballot won’t be feeding it into the scanners as other voters do, she said, because election officials have to take time to research whether the person is a valid voter or not.

“I would very much prefer that everyone who wants to vote in this election try to get registered before October 17,” Beals said. “Because we want you to vote a regular ballot.”

Youngkin talks elections in Texas

As early voting got underway, the man who hired Beals was taking a stage in Austin at the Texas Tribune Festival, where the topic of Republican election denialism came up as Youngkin sat for an interview at the high-profile political event.

David M. Drucker, a political correspondent with the Washington Examiner, asked Youngkin about his planned campaign stops for Republican candidates like Kari Lake, the GOP nominee for governor in Arizona who insists, falsely, that former President Donald Trump won in 2020.

“You are comfortable supporting Republicans that have issues or dispute the outcome of the last election?” Drucker asked.

“I am comfortable supporting Republican candidates. And we don’t agree on everything,” Youngkin replied. “I have said that I firmly believe that Joe Biden was elected president.”

Closer to home, Sen. Amanda Chase, R-Chesterfield, who has spread 2020 conspiracy theories without producing evidence of widespread fraud in Virginia’s election, has called on Youngkin to suspend the use of all “voting computers” in Virginia and switch to hand-counting all ballots.

There’s been no sign that the Youngkin administration is taking her suggestion seriously, and the state usually avoids making major changes just as an election begins.

Paper ballots are used throughout Virginia after the state discontinued the use of touch-screen voting machines in 2017 due to security concerns.

Beals, who once worked as an aide to Chase, called paper ballots “one of the most secure ways to vote” and indicated she had no problem with the state continuing to use scanners that are routinely tested for accuracy.

“It is a counting machine,” Beals said. “It is not a voting machine. It is a machine that counts ballots.”

As Beals waited for a coffee at a Starbucks near the Chesterfield voting office, she got a text message from her predecessor. Former elections commissioner Chris Piper, whom Youngkin chose not to keep in the job, wished her well as her first election got underway.

“You got this!” Piper said.

by Graham Moomaw, Virginia Mercury


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Big Bon Secours profits from a bare-bones Richmond hospital and more Va. headlines

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The state Capitol. (Ned Oliver/ Virginia Mercury)

 

• A bare-bones community hospital in one of Richmond’s poorest neighborhoods has the highest profit margin of any hospital in Virginia. Its profitability comes from a drug program aimed at helping impoverished communities, but nonprofit health system Bon Secours isn’t reinvesting the money back into the facility.—New York Times

• An election fight between two Republican lawmakers from Southwest Virginia is getting physical, with Del. Marie March pursuing criminal charges against Del. Wren Williams over a collision at a GOP fundraising event. March says Williams intentionally pushed her. Williams says it was an accidental bump.—Cardinal News

• “Descendants of enslaved Virginians who worked in the Executive Mansion say they want their ancestors acknowledged during public tours at the home.”—Axios


• Former Virginia congressman Denver Riggleman is frustrating members of the congressional Jan. 6 committee he worked for by publishing a “behind-the-scenes” book before the investigation is finished.—Washington Post

• The percentage of Virginia students getting basic vaccinations required for school has been “steadily declining since 2008.”—Virginian-Pilot

• A judge admonished a former Prince William County election official for not quickly hiring a lawyer to defend herself against corruption charges.—WTOP

• Some NFL owners say they’re given increasing consideration to the idea of forcing Washington Commanders owner Dan Snyder to sell the team.—Washington Post

• U.S. Sen. Mark Warner got a can of tuna delivered via drone in Christiansburg. “Looks to me like I got lunch.”—Roanoke Times

• An Eastern Shore man carved a 1,600-foot chain out of wood.—WAVY

by Staff Report, Virginia Mercury


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Governor Youngkin donates his third-quarter salary to G³ Community Services

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On September 26, 2022, Governor Glenn Youngkin and First Lady Suzanne Youngkin announced that they will donate his third-quarter salary to G³ Community Services, a veteran-run non-profit organization that is focused on providing student mentorship through Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) activities and offering assistance to veterans who are transitioning from the military to the civilian workforce.

Governor Glenn Youngkin and First Lady Suzanne Youngkin present check to G³ Community Services in Stafford, Virginia on September 26th, 2022. Official photo by Christian Martinez, Office of the Governor.

“The mission of G3 Community Services is to restore, inspire, and empower the family unit while focusing on mission rather than self. This organization exemplifies the heart and the Spirit of Virginia,” said Governor Glenn Youngkin. “I am pleased to donate this quarter’s salary to G3 community services to support their continued efforts to uplift families and localities across the Commonwealth.”

“Investing in the lives and livelihoods of others is a blessed vocation. It’s heartwarming to see the good being done for students, citizens, and military-servants through veteran-run G3 Community Services,” said First Lady Suzanne Youngkin.


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Evermade Foods to create 46 new jobs in Fauquier County

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On September 26, 2022, Governor Glenn Youngkin announced that Evermade Foods, a Virginia-based co-manufacturer of prepared meals sold under private labels at grocery stores and through meal subscription services, will invest $110,000 to expand in Fauquier County. To support increased customer demand, the company will increase manufacturing capacity at its operation located at 6775 Kennedy Road in Warrenton and introduce a new product line of shelf-stable, grab-and-go products. Virginia successfully competed with North Carolina and Texas for the project, creating 46 new jobs.

“Since day one, we’ve been working to foster 10,000 new start-up businesses in the Commonwealth, and we are thrilled to celebrate the rapid growth of Evermade Foods, an exemplary Virginia start-up that is making a name for itself in the Commonwealth’s thriving food and beverage processing industry,” said Governor Glenn Youngkin. “Our large and diverse ecosystem in this sector ensures partners and suppliers, warehousing, and sophisticated transportation infrastructure to move products to market quickly. We look forward to supporting the company’s continued success in Fauquier County.”

“Food and beverage processing is at the heart of the Commonwealth’s manufacturing sector, and we are excited for Evermade Foods to grow in this important industry,” said Secretary of Commerce and Trade Caren Merrick. “This expansion will enhance the company’s products portfolio while adding 46 new, high-quality jobs in Fauquier County, and we thank the company for reinvesting in Virginia.”

“When we decided to expand our footprint with a new company Virginia was a logical choice for us, as we already had experience dealing with local and state entities,” said Rachelle Slotnick, CEO, and Founder of Evermade Foods. “We chose Fauquier County due to development opportunities and availability of new commercial space. Virginia has provided us with a stable workforce, excellent transportation for receiving and distributing products throughout the mid-Atlantic, and a great relationship with the Virginia Economic Development Partnership and Fauquier County. We look forward to a long and productive relationship with the community at large as we continue to grow and expand in Fauquier County.”


“On behalf of the Fauquier County Board of Supervisors, we are grateful for the investment Evermade Foods is making in our community,” said Rick Gerhardt, Chair of the Fauquier County Board of Supervisors. “Food production is one of our target business sectors, as we recognize the importance of the agricultural community and the jobs and tax revenue that companies like Evermade create for our citizens. Evermade helps food-based entrepreneurs grow their businesses to the next level by providing packaging services and technical expertise to help them get their products to larger markets. We also appreciate collaborating with the Virginia Economic Development Partnership on this Virginia Jobs Investment Program grant to assist Evermade with workforce recruiting and training.”

“We are delighted by the expansion of Evermade Foods in Fauquier County and appreciate their investment in our community,” said Senator Jill Vogel. “We also thank the Virginia Economic Development Partnership for their support. It demonstrates the confidence of business investment in our region, which has an unmatched quality workforce and capital resources.”

“This expansion made by Evermade Foods here in Fauquier County is a testament to the enterprising spirit that Virginia has become known for throughout the country,” said Delegate Elizabeth Guzman. “Fauquier County has been a beneficiary of steady statewide leadership in economic development, and I am happy that our ability to attract and retain businesses continues to stay strong. We here in Fauquier County are proud of Evermade Foods’ decision to expand and invest in new jobs for our growing local economy.”

Since opening its doors in April 2022 in Fauquier County, Evermade Foods has invested $1.7 million in building upgrades, machinery, and tools to its USDA-and FDA-compliant 12,000+-square-foot commercial kitchen and packaging line and warehouse.

The Virginia Economic Development Partnership worked with Fauquier County to secure the project for Virginia and will support Evermade Foods’ job creation through the Virginia Jobs Investment Program (VJIP), which provides consultative services and funding to companies creating new jobs to support employee recruitment and training activities. As a business incentive supporting economic development, VJIP reduces the human resource costs of new and expanding companies. VJIP is state-funded, demonstrating Virginia’s commitment to enhancing job opportunities for citizens.

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2022 Hands & Harvest Festival offers a weekend to celebrate Fall in the mountains

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Highland County’s annual Hands & Harvest Festival returns with county-wide fall fun during the weekend of October 7–9, 2022, where everyone is invited to celebrate the traditions, harvest, and crafts found in this rural mountain community.

From farms to a fire tower, visitors can experience the sights and tastes of the season while viewing the beautiful countryside of fall foliage. On the self-guided Harvest Trail, the public is invited to take part in traditional fall staples like cider pressing, making apple butter, or picking pumpkins at local farms and maple sugar camps, or they can try something different like viewing the process of creating colorful barn quilts or taking a tour of a mini equine sanctuary. While traveling, guests can get their Virginia Maple Syrup Trail passports stamped at five sugar camps (www.virginiamaplesyrup.com). New community activities and attractions include a 5K Fall Color Run, gemstone mining, or a sneak peek of the historic Jones/McCoy House Museum. Past staples like Valley AeroSpace Team Rocket Launches, the restored Sounding Knob Fire Tower, annual sweater and used book sales, and local artist demonstrations provide unique memories for the entire family.

The Original Rhondels

Free entertainment abounds at the festival! Kick off your weekend on Friday afternoon with bluegrass music at the courthouse lawn with Eyes on Him, or enjoy the acoustic duo of Mike Eye and Cory Thomas at Big Fish Cider. Back by popular demand, The Original Rhondels return to The Highland Center in Monterey on Saturday night, delighting audiences with outstanding vocals, powerful brass, and exciting showmanship. Dance along with a variety of tunes, including top 10 hits like “May I,” “I’ve Been Hurt,” and “What Kind of Fool Do You Think I Am.” On Sunday afternoon, join in the excitement of an old-fashioned Street Dance on Spruce Street in Monterey with one of Virginia’s oldest clogging groups, the Little Switzerland Cloggers, as well as local square dance callers Ellen and Eugene Ratcliffe for a rollicking performance and interactive family fun.


An Arts and Crafts Vendor Market on the Highland County Courthouse Lawn in Monterey offers one-of-a-kind items like pottery, baskets, jewelry, wool items, paintings, rescued wood creations, and much more to get an early start on holiday shopping. For foodies, the Friday Highland Farmers’ Market and Puff’s BBQ will be open on the Courthouse Lawn, with Big Fish Cider close by, and specialty fall-themed menus at local restaurants are sure to please. Complete your shopping needs by visiting an old general store or venue nestled around the countryside, including the grand opening of the Doe Hill Mercantile that will include an Heirloom Seed and Daffodil Bulb Swap.

All of this and many other adventures await with a visit to Highland County, Virginia. Full schedule, details, and addresses of all the festival happenings can be found at highlandcounty.org/hands-harvest-festival. Maps with daily schedules will be available at local stores and on the Highland County Courthouse Lawn in Monterey during the event.

The Hands & Harvest Festival is brought to you by the Highland County Chamber of Commerce. Top sponsors include Fair Lawn Farm and the Highland County Arts Council.

The Highland County Chamber of Commerce is a 501(c)(6) membership nonprofit organization with a mission to lift up local businesses and entrepreneurs, promote Highland County, and champion economic prosperity and quality of life. For more information, please visit www.highlandcounty.org.

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6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
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Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
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Fall Bazaar @ FRUMC Fellowship Hall
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Fall Bazaar will be held Friday, Sept 30th, from 4:30 – 6:30 pm, and Saturday, October 1st, from 8 am – 2 pm, in the Front Royal United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. Baked goods, jewelry[...]
6:00 pm Fire Pit Fridays @ Shenandoah Valley Golf Club
Fire Pit Fridays @ Shenandoah Valley Golf Club
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Fire Pit Fridays @ Shenandoah Valley Golf Club
 
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Fall Bazaar @ FRUMC Fellowship Hall
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Fall Bazaar @ FRUMC Fellowship Hall
Fall Bazaar will be held Saturday, October 1st, from 8 am – 2 pm, in the Front Royal United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall. Baked goods, jewelry and accessories, Silent Auction, holiday decorations, and apple dumplings[...]
11:00 am Fall Farm Days: The Nature of Sk... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: The Nature of Sk... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 1 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: The Nature of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. During Fall Farm Days’ Nature Weekend, get in touch with nature and explore a managed landscape rich in biodiversity. Discover native flora and fauna, learn the craft of beekeeping, the importance of various[...]
11:00 am The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 1 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and are ready to show[...]
5:00 pm WATTS 3rd Annual Fundraiser @ Bowling Green Country Club North
WATTS 3rd Annual Fundraiser @ Bowling Green Country Club North
Oct 1 @ 5:00 pm – 10:00 pm
WATTS 3rd Annual Fundraiser @ Bowling Green Country Club North
WATTS 3rd Annual Fundraiser – An Evening of Caring & Sharing Come out to support WATTS homeless shelter (Winchester Area Temporary Thermal Shelter) and help us fundraise for our upcoming overnight shelter season! A fun[...]
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11:00 am Fall Farm Days: The Nature of Sk... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: The Nature of Sk... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: The Nature of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. During Fall Farm Days’ Nature Weekend, get in touch with nature and explore a managed landscape rich in biodiversity. Discover native flora and fauna, learn the craft of beekeeping, the importance of various[...]
11:00 am The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and are ready to show[...]