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Stay in the shade if you take these drugs

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Some drugs magnify the harmful effects of the sun.

According to Harvard Health Letter, you should check with your doctor to make sure the medications you are taking are sun-safe.

You’ll want to get more shade and less sun if you are taking the following drugs:

1. Antibiotics. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, ProQuin), doxycycline (Oracea,Vibramycin), sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Gantanol, Septra) or tetracycline (Achromycin).


2. Cancer drugs that increase sun sensitivity. They include 5-fluorouracil (Carac, Efudex, Fluoroplex), dacarbazine (DTIC-Dome) and vemurafenib (Zelboraf).

3. Decongestants and older antihistamines. Pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), phenylephrine (Sudafed PE) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl). Try fexofenadine (Allegra) or loratadine (Claritin).

4. Diabetes medications. Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) and glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase).

5. Diuretics. Furosemide (Lasix) and hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide)

6. Cardiovascular medications. Amiodarone (Cordarone), for serious heart rhythm disturbances, and the blood pressure drugs diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) and nifedipine (Procardia).

7. Pain relievers. Ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), celecoxib (Celebrex) and piroxicam (Feldene) increase the chances of serious sunburn. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) doesn’t.

8. Psychiatric drugs. Chlorpromazine (Thorazine), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), and other anti-anxiety and antidepressant drugs can inhibit the body’s ability to sweat.

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Are your thumbs killing you?

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You might not think that you’re getting a workout when you flop down on the couch to text with a friend or scroll aimlessly through your social media accounts, but at least one part of your body might disagree.

“Texting thumb,” often formally diagnosed as de Quervain’s tenosynovitis, is a repetitive stress injury that results in inflammation in the tendons of your thumb, according to Houston Methodist.

When angry tendons rub in their narrow channel, the result is pain that begins at the base of the thumb, and in severe cases, can radiate up through the side of the wrist and to the lower arm. The pain usually occurs in the dominant hand.

The thumb is the most likely culprit, but other fingers aren’t safe from mobile device overuse — according to Healthline, “smartphone finger” might cause pain or stiffness at the base of the affected finger, clicking sounds when you move your pinky, stiff fingers in the morning and numbness at in your fingertips. Smartphone pinky or smartphone finger is often more common with larger devices, like our beloved iPads and Kindles.


If you’re experiencing texting thumb or smartphone finger, you can try a few things to see if the pain subsides.

* Take a break from your devices to see if your pain subsides.

* Hot and cold therapy can help. Try ice for inflammation or heat for stiffness.

* Over-the-counter pain relievers like Tylenol or Advil can relieve discomfort.

If your pain is especially persistent, you can try a splint or brace to keep those joints stable. But if the pain continues despite rest and remedies or if you experience recurring numbness, it’s time to call the doctor.

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Try resistance bands for strength

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Stronger, leaner, and healthier — according to the experts at the Mayo Clinic, regular strength training can provide all of those benefits. And if heading to the gym to hit the weights isn’t your speed, resistance bands and body weight exercises offer a portable, affordable option that you can do almost anywhere.

According to Harvard Medical School, resistance bands are a great addition to body weight exercises that can help you preserve and build lean muscle. Resistance band training can also help improve your balance, gait, and flexibility, and they’re user-friendly for even fitness novices, according to NBC News.
Resistance bands are available in various styles, including single lengths of stretchy elastic, closed loops, or rubber tubes with handles. You may want to invest in a few types of bands with varying levels of resistance — don’t worry, their compact size means that even several bands are easy to stow away.

Banded squat
Place a loop or mini-loop resistance band (a length tied in a circle also works) around your thighs just above your knees, and stand with your feet slightly more than hip-width apart. Slowly push your hips back into a seated position while bending your knees. When you reach a seated position and your knees are at a 90-degree angle, hold the position for a few seconds and then slowly move back into a standing position. Make sure to squeeze your glutes — these strong muscles provide the bulk of the power for this movement. Perform two to three sets of eight to 12 reps.

Banded lunge
With the band around your mid-to-lower thighs, just above your knees, take a big step forward and lower down until your back knee hovers just above the ground. Lift yourself back into a standing position by driving through the heel of your front leg. Perform two to three sets of eight to 12 reps on each side.


Banded chest punch
Loop the exercise band around your back and under your armpits. Hold an end or a handle in each hand by your shoulders. Slowly and deliberately, punch your right arm out on a slight diagonal in front of your body, before repeating with the other side. This counts as a single rep — perform two to three sets of eight to 12 reps.

Seated resistance band row
Sit on the floor with your legs straight in front of you, feet more than shoulder-width apart. Loop your resistance band (a band with handles is best for this exercise) and cross the handles in front of you to make an X shape. Pull the handles slowly and carefully into your ribs, making sure to sit up straight and let your back muscles do the work.

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Your health means everything – protect it by getting vaccinated for flu season

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Shorter days and cooler temperatures are tell-tale signs that autumn has arrived. Unfortunately, another sign of the season is the beginning of increased flu activity. Flu season can last from autumn to as late as May – peaking between December and February. According to a study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), last year’s flu cases were historically low, thanks in large part to widespread practice of safety measures to combat another widely-circulating respiratory illness – COVID-19 – including school closures, mask wearing and social distancing. With less common practice of those measures over the past several months, we could see an uptick in flu cases like prior years’ levels. That potential – along with the continuing COVID-19 pandemic – makes it even more important that we each do what we can to minimize our risk, protect our health and protect the health of those around us. Getting vaccinated against the flu is a vitally important way to fight it.

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses and can cause mild to severe illness and even lead to death in certain situations. Everyone is susceptible to the flu, but individuals with a greater risk of developing complications from these viruses include children younger than five years old, adults 65 and older, pregnant women, residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, and those with certain medical conditions like asthma, heart disease and blood disorders.

At Fauquier Health, one of the essential ways we’re Making Communities Healthier is making sure that our neighbors understand how to fight preventable diseases like the flu. As we have all learned during this time, our health means everything and it has never been more important to protect it.

And there are a few key strategies to protect yourself, your family and our community; prevent the flu from spreading; and even speed up your recovery if you do become ill:


First – and most importantly – get vaccinated. As we have witnessed this year with the safety and success of COVID-19 vaccines in decreasing transmission rates, similarly, flu vaccination is the single-best way to protect yourself from influenza viruses. While it is still possible to contract the flu after getting vaccinated, studies show that flu vaccinations will lessen the severity of symptoms if you do get sick. Getting vaccinated also affords you the peace of mind that comes from knowing you are doing everything you can to protect yourself against the flu.

The CDC recommends annual flu vaccination for everyone six months and older, with any age-appropriate flu vaccine. If you are considering a nasal spray flu vaccine, it is important to know that this option is approved by the CDC for use in non-pregnant individuals, ages two through 49, and there is a precaution against this option for those with certain underlying medical conditions. You should talk with your healthcare provider regarding which flu vaccination method works best for you.

Like COVID-19 vaccines, flu vaccines can take approximately two weeks to become fully effective, so you should plan to receive your flu vaccine before flu activity begins in your area. A good rule of thumb is to get vaccinated no later than the end of October.

And while we’re on the subject of COVID-19 vaccines, if you have not yet been vaccinated against COVID-19, there’s no better time than now – especially as COVID-19 cases continue to spread and the potential for flu activity increases. You can even conveniently get both vaccines on the same day, to save you from having a second visit. If you have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 yet, ask about getting it when you get your flu shot. Being vaccinated against both viruses is your best defense against becoming infected with one or both diseases.

You can visit a walk-in clinic or pharmacy, or your primary care provider’s office to receive a flu vaccination. If you don’t have a provider, we can connect you with one. Visit our website and browse our Find a Doctor tab FauquierHealth.org/find-a-doctor, or call 540.316.DOCS.

In addition to getting vaccinated, there are other simple steps you can take to protect yourself and your family, and help prevent the spread of flu and other infections like COVID-19 during flu season and year-round, including:

  • Washing your hands regularly with soap and water for 20 seconds, or using a hand sanitizer that is at least 60 percent alcohol-based
  • Wearing a face mask in indoor, public spaces
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Avoiding sharing food, cups or eating utensils
  • Regularly disinfecting your home and belongings, such as doorknobs, light switches, children’s toys and play areas
  • Staying home from school or work if you are sick to prevent the spread of germs
  • Covering your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing with a tissue, your sleeve or elbow, and NOT your bare hands
  • Calling your primary care provider with any questions

At Fauquier Health, we are taking additional steps to help prevent the flu, COVID-19 and other respiratory illnesses from spreading by:

  • Implementing universal masking for patients, providers, employees, visitors, and anyone entering our facility
  • Setting up stations stocked with alcohol-based sanitizers and hands-free trash cans throughout our facility
  • Continuing stringent cleaning and disinfection protocols
  • Encouraging all patients, staff, and visitors to get their flu and COVID-19 vaccinations

If you or someone you know notices symptoms including coughing, sore throat, fever, or other upper respiratory symptoms, please see your healthcare provider right away. Many of the most common symptoms of flu are consistent with COVID-19, so it may be hard to tell the difference between them. Testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis. Don’t ignore your symptoms. Limit your contact with others as much as possible when symptoms appear and stay home (or keep your child home) for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone, except to seek medical care (If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to self-isolate for a longer period of time).

The good news is that when you act on your symptoms, visit a provider and flu is detected early, prescription antiviral drugs can often help treat the illness and shorten the time you are sick by one or two days.

For additional information about the 2021-22 flu season, visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/flu or contact your local health department.


By Christine Hart Kress, Fauquier Health, Chief Nursing Officer

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Epinephrine auto-injectors: an ally for allergy sufferers

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Anaphylactic shock is a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that can occur within seconds of exposure to an allergen and requires rapid intervention. Fortunately, there’s a portable device that can be used to temporarily reverse symptoms in an emergency. It’s called an epinephrine auto-injector and is available under the brand names EpiPen, Auvi-Q, and Emerade.

Also known as adrenaline, epinephrine is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands that are responsible for your body’s fight-or-flight response. Among other things, it increases your heart rate and relaxes the muscles in your airways to improve your breathing. A synthetic version of this hormone is used in auto-injectors to ease symptoms of anaphylactic shock, which can include:

· A swollen tongue or lips, or tingling in the mouth
· Red, itchy welts (hives), flushed skin, or sudden paleness
· Wheezing, difficulty breathing, or feeling like you have a lump in your throat
· Confusion, dizziness, or fainting
· Sudden drop in blood pressure
· Abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
· A weak or rapid pulse

Since anaphylactic shock can recur hours later without further exposure to the allergen, it’s vital to head straight to an emergency room for observation and treatment after using an epinephrine auto-injector. Additionally, a second dose may be needed within five to 20 minutes of the first injection if the person’s symptoms don’t improve. Therefore, it’s best to have several auto-injectors on hand, especially if you live far from a hospital.


To learn more about these life-saving devices, consult an allergist.

Know how to use it

You shouldn’t wait until a fire breaks out to learn how to use a fire extinguisher. Similarly, waiting until you have an allergic reaction to read the instructions on your auto-injector is dangerous. It’s also important that close friends and family members be familiar with the device in case you can’t administer it yourself.

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Get Your Mammo: It’s an hour that could save your life

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According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the U.S., behind only skin cancers. In fact, the ACS puts the average risk as a one in eight chance that a woman will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. And according to the World Health Organization, breast cancer is now the most common cancer globally, claiming 12 percent of new cancer cases. Breast cancer is also the second leading cause of cancer death in women, superseded only by lung cancer.

So, that’s some not-so-good news. How about some good news? Those death rates have been steadily dropping. Statistics show that the overall death rate from breast cancer decreased by one percent each year from 2013 to 2018. Now, the question is “why?” Well, the decreases have been associated with several factors, including better treatments and earlier detection through screenings.

Here’s some more good news. You can get screened by scheduling a simple, routine mammogram. A mammogram takes only about one hour, once a year, but it’s benefits can last much longer. Mammograms help detect breast cancer earlier than waiting for symptoms to appear. That’s an incredibly important weapon in the fight against breast cancer because that early detection can result in an easier and more effective treatment if cancer is discovered.

While there are certain risk factors for breast cancer – including lifestyle-related risks, as well as some risk factors you cannot change, like your family medical history – some breast cancer patients have no risk factors or even any symptoms. And 85 percent of breast cancer cases are in women with no family history of the disease. That’s why early detection is so vital to finding and treating breast cancer.


If you are a woman 40 and older, you should be including an annual mammogram in your yearly health journey. If you are at higher risk, you may need to begin annual screenings sooner. Some of those risk factors include genetic mutations, having dense breasts, certain reproductive histories, being overweight after menopause, a family history of breast and ovarian cancer, a personal history of radiation therapy or hormone replacement therapy, a history with the drug diethylstilbestrol (DES) and a lack of physical activity.

As with other health issues, it’s important to have a discussion with your trusted provider about your lifestyle and risks and to determine the right time for you to begin annual breast cancer screening.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so if you haven’t already scheduled your mammogram for the year, now is a great time to get it on your calendar and get the peace of mind that comes from taking charge of your health. It’s one hour a year that could save your life.


If you would like to schedule a mammogram or talk with a provider about your breast health, call 540.316.DOCS or visit the “Find a Doctor” tab at FauquierHealth.org. For more information on breast cancer and mammograms, visit breastcancer.org and cdc.gov/cancer/breast.

By: Nikita Mishra, OB/GYN, Women’s Health Physician

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Breast Cancer Awareness Month; Understanding the role of genetics

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Have you ever wondered why some people are more at risk of developing breast cancer than others? While many factors can come into play, including the person’s age, lifestyle, and environment, about 10 percent of cases are the result of a genetic predisposition. Since October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, here’s a look at the role that genetics play in this all-too-common disease.

Genes and their variants
A mutation is a change in the DNA sequence of a gene, which can potentially disrupt its proper functioning. While some gene variants occur naturally during your lifetime, others are passed down from your parents. This means that if either your mother or father has a gene variant, there’s a 50 percent chance you’ll inherit it. The danger is if this mutation is in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, which are the most common causes of hereditary breast cancer.

Hereditary risk factors
In addition to having a higher risk of breast cancer, people with this genetic mutation are also more likely to:

• Be affected by cancer before the age of 50
• Have more than one type of cancer at the same time
• Develop rare types of cancer
• Have family members with the same type of cancer


Do you think you might be genetically predisposed to breast cancer? If so, ask your doctor for a referral to a specialist who can review your family and medical history and assess your level of risk.

 

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Upcoming Events

Oct
18
Mon
11:00 am Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 18 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Kindergarten and First Grade. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: Ages 5 and 6 Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at Strokes[...]
1:00 pm Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 18 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Grades 2nd and 3rd. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: 7 and 8 years old Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at[...]
Oct
21
Thu
10:00 am Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie at Strokes of Creativity. Tickets: CLICK HERE Cost: $80 for 6 weeks Dates: Thursdays – Oct 21, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18, Dec 4 Time: 10 am[...]
1:00 pm Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Art Class for 4th & 5th @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Grades 4th and 5th. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: 9 and 10 years old Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at[...]
Oct
23
Sat
11:00 am Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 23 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area.  During Fall Farm Days History Weekend, step back in time and see history come to life. Stroll through the Historic Area buildings, interact with our living historians and discover our links to historic[...]
1:00 pm Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Paint Class for Kids Ages 8 and up @ Strokes of Creativity
This is a painting class for children 8 years old and up. Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at Strokes of Creativity. Date: Saturday, October 23,[...]
Oct
24
Sun
11:00 am Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky M... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 24 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: History of Sky Meadows @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area.  During Fall Farm Days History Weekend, step back in time and see history come to life. Stroll through the Historic Area buildings, interact with our living historians and discover our links to historic[...]
Oct
25
Mon
11:00 am Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 25 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Art Class for K-1st @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Kindergarten and First Grade. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: Ages 5 and 6 Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at Strokes[...]
1:00 pm Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 25 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Art Class for 2nd & 3rd @ Strokes of Creativity
This class is for Grades 2nd and 3rd. Perfect for home schoolers. Recommended ages: 7 and 8 years old Tickets: CLICK HERE Tickets are available through Square Up, or can be paid in person at[...]
Oct
28
Thu
10:00 am Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Oct 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie at Strokes of Creativity. Tickets: CLICK HERE Cost: $80 for 6 weeks Dates: Thursdays – Oct 21, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18, Dec 4 Time: 10 am[...]