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Warren County acreage portion of Cedar Creek battlefield included in state Historic Grant

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The Department of Historic Resources announced today that grants from this year’s Virginia Battlefield Preservation Fund will protect more than 610 acres including acreage associated with the Revolutionary War, in addition to Civil War battlefields and the actions of United States Colored Troops.

The General Assembly established the Virginia Battlefield Preservation Fund (VBPF) in 2010, and authorized the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR) to administer the fund by evaluating and disbursing grant awards to eligible recipients. After receiving more grant applications than the 2020 fund of $1 million can support, DHR determined this year’s selection, as it has in the past, through a rigorous evaluation process.

Based on DHR’s recommendations, the Commonwealth will award VBPF grants to four organizations: the American Battlefield Trust, the Capital Region Land Conservancy, the Great Bridge Battlefield and Waterways History Foundation, and the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.

These nonprofits will use the VBPF grants to leverage private matching donations to preserve land tracts associated with six Civil War battlefields — Cedar Creek, Deep Bottom, Fisher’s Hill, Port Republic, Williamsburg, and New Market Heights — and the Revolutionary War’s Battle of Great Bridge.


In accordance with VBPF stipulations, organizations that receive battlefield grants must donate an easement to the Virginia Board of Historic Resources on any acreage acquired with the state grants. The easements restrict or forbid development of the acreage, allowing for perpetual protection of the land.

In selecting the awards, DHR considered each battlefield’s significance and ranking in Congress’s mandated “Report on the Nation’s Civil War Battlefields,” issued in 1993 and subsequently updated, and “Report on the Historic Preservation of Revolutionary War and War of 1812 Sites,” issued in 2007 and amended. Additionally, DHR weighed factors in the grant applications such as the proximity of a battlefield parcel to already protected lands; the threat of encroaching development that could transform a parcel’s historic look and feel at the time of a battle; and the potential for education, recreation, research, or heritage tourism in connection with a battlefield tract.

Using these criteria, DHR will be disbursing to the —

  • American Battlefield Trust combined grants totaling $215,534 to purchase 272 acres affiliated with two battles, as follows:
    • $150,000 toward the purchase of 250 acres in York County (Battle of Williamsburg), and
    • $65,534 toward the purchase of 22 acres in Henrico County (Battle of New Market Heights)
  • Capital Region Land Conservancy $78,000 to purchase 39 acres in Henrico County associated with the Deep Bottom battlefields.
  • Great Bridge Battlefield and Waterways History Foundation $100,000 to purchase a 0.7-acre tract in the City of Chesapeake affiliated with the Battle of Great Bridge; and
  • Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation combined grants of $606,466 to purchase lands associated with three battles:
    • $100,000 toward the purchase of 120 acres in Shenandoah County associated with the Battle of Fisher’s Hill;
    • $300,000 toward the purchase of 72 acres in Warren County associated with the Battle of Cedar Creek; and
    • $206,466 toward the purchase of 107 acres in Rockingham County associated with the Battle of Port Republic.

“The award of these funds demonstrates the Commonwealth’s continued commitment to the preservation of historic battlefield properties, and contributes as well to our state’s significant and steadily growing heritage tourism,” said Julie V. Langan, DHR director.


Battlefield Grant Awards 2020
(
Summaries of Battles)

Revolutionary War

  • Great Bridge Battlefield, City of Chesapeake
    Preserved Property: Mair Tract (0.7 acre)
    Sponsor: Great Bridge Battlefield and Waterways History Foundation

The Battle of Great Bridge, December 9, 1775, was the first land battle of the American Revolution fought in Virginia. Pitting Virginia militia against British forces, the battle centered on a critical bridge crossing that spanned the Elizabeth River between the present-day cities of Norfolk and Chesapeake on the only road leading south to North Carolina. Royal Governor Lord Dunmore ordered British forces, who had fortified one side of the crossing, to attack and disperse American rebel forces, numbering about 400 men, who occupied the other side of the river. The Virginia militia, under the command of William Woodford, repulsed the British attack, and forced Dunmore and British forces to abandon Norfolk, although the British destroyed the city on January 1, 1776. The Great Bridge Battlefield and Waterways History Foundation purchase of the Mair Tract presents a unique opportunity to preserve land associated with a Revolutionary War battlefield. GBB&WHF’s plans for the property include full public access and pursuit of archaeological research potential at the site.

Civil War Battlefields

  • Cedar Creek Battlefield, Warren Co.
    Preserved Property: Brill Tract (72 acres)
    Sponsor: Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation (SVBF)

At the Battle of Cedar Creek on 19 October 1864, Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early launched an early morning assault against encamped Union troops bivouacked near Cedar Creek. Initially sweeping the Union army from the field, the Confederate attack slowed by mid-morning as Early attempted to restore order to his men. As they paused, Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan—absent from the field—returned and made an inspiring ride along the reforming Union lines. Reenergized, the Union army advanced against the Confederates around four in the afternoon and shattered Early’s army. With the destruction of Early’s army, the Union held control of the Shenandoah Valley. SBVF purchase of the Brill Tract, which adjoins previously conserved lands on its northern and southern boundaries, supports preservation of a continuous corridor of protected historic landscape associated with the Battle of Cedar Creek. Long-term plans include a wayside plaza and trailhead although the timeline for this is undetermined. Plans include immediate installation of a trail with limited signage for public access.

  • Williamsburg Battlefield, York Co.
    Preserved Property: Egger Tract (250 acres)
    Sponsor: American Battlefield Trust

In April 1862, Union Gen. George B. McClellan led the massive Army of the Potomac from Fort Monroe toward Richmond, the Confederate capital. The army advanced west along the “peninsula” between the York and James Rivers, in what became known as the Peninsula Campaign. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston commanded the Confederate army, which on May 3 withdrew toward the capital from his initial line at Yorktown. On May 5, his men filed into prepared defensive works just east of Williamsburg. The pursuing Federals soon attacked and heavy fighting occurred throughout the rainy day, with Confederate counterattacks occurring late in the afternoon. The Federals suffered about 2,300 casualties to the Confederates’ 1,600. During the night, as at Yorktown, Johnston’s men slipped out of the earthworks and continued the march toward Richmond. Preservation of the Egger Tract will preserve land with archaeological research potential, including the site of the former Custis Farm and a possible pre-historic component. The land is unimproved, and, although logged in the past, retains integrity as an historic landscape

  • Port Republic Battlefield, Rockingham Co.
    Preserved Property: Edwards (Coaling) Tract (107 acres)
    Sponsor: Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation

Fighting at Port Republic on June 9, 1862 involved Confederate attacks against Union troops holding strong positions just north of the Kaylor Farm. The collapse of the Union line gave the Confederate army undisputed control of the upper and middle Shenandoah Valley. Purchase of the Edwards Tract will create a corridor of conserved land that preserves a critical landscape associated with the Battle of Port Republic and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. It will also open 100 acres not previously accessible to the public and allow for the installation of interpretive signage about the battle.

  • Fisher’s Hill Battlefield, Shenandoah Co.
    Preserved Property: Erbach (Stoner-Keller) Tract (120 acres)
    Sponsor: Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation

Confederate fortifications across the width of the valley at Fishers Hill prevented the Union army’s use of the Valley Turnpike (roughly U.S. 11 today). A Union attack on September 21, 1864 at Fisher’s Hill and a surprise Union flanking maneuver on September 22 resulted in a Confederate retreat, opening the Shenandoah Valley to Union Gen. Phil Sheridan’s destruction of mills, barns, crops and livestock later that year. The Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation’s purchase of the Erbach Tract will protect a property individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places and significant for its battlefield landscape. It comprises the village of Fisher’s Hill and retains much of its integrity as a rural historic mill village. The property will remain in private ownership with a preservation easement placed on it.

  • New Market Heights Battlefield, Henrico Co.
    Preserved Property: Welch Tract (22 acres)
    Sponsor: American Battlefield Trust

The Battle New Market Heights, September 29, 1864, was part of a series of extended combats at Chaffin’s Farm and Confederate Forts Gregg, Gilmer and Johnson, the Confederate defenses east of Richmond. Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant ordered the assault to create a diversionary attack on Richmond, hoping to deflect Gen. Robert E. Lee’s attention from Grant’s movement against the Southside Railroad west of Petersburg during the siege of that city. On the night of September 28-29, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James began an assault on the Richmond defenses. Butler targeted the Confederate line anchored on the north bank of the James River near the Chaffin Farm. Butler’s right column under Maj. Gen. David Birney moved the X Corps north from the Deep Bottom bridgehead toward the Confederate works atop New Market Heights manned by Brig. Gen. John Gregg. A brigade of U.S. Colored Troops heroically attacked the heights but was repulsed. Birney reinforced the assault force and stormed the heights again. The battle’s tide turned when Union forces turned the Confederate left flank. The Union success at New Market Heights compelled Gregg to pull Confederate troops back to Forts Gregg, Gilmer and Johnson. The American Battlefield Trust purchase of the Welch Tract supports preservation of a continuous corridor of protected historic landscape associated with the New Market Heights, Deep Bottom I, and Deep Bottom II battlefields. In particular, the property adjoins another preserved tract and both properties are associated with the USCT during the Civil War and present new opportunities for research and education. When complete, rehabilitation of the battlefield landscape and interpretation of the property with trails and signage will have a positive community impact. These efforts also will open lands previously not accessible to the public.

  • Deep Bottom Battlefields, Henrico Co.
    Preserved Property: Long Bridge Road Tract (39 acres)
    Sponsor: Capital Region Land Conservancy (CRLC)
    • First Deep Bottom: This July 27–29, 1864 battle was part of the Siege of Petersburg. During the night of July 26 and 27, the Union Army II Corps and two divisions of Gen. Phil Sheridan’s cavalry under the command of Maj. Gen. Winfield Hancock crossed to the north side of James River to threaten Richmond, diverting Confederate forces from the impending attack at Petersburg on July 30. Union forces abandoned efforts to turn the Confederate position at New Market Heights and Fussell’s Mill after Confederates strongly reinforced their lines and counterattacked. During the night of July 29, the Federals re-crossed the river, leaving a garrison to hold the bridgehead at Deep Bottom.
    • Second Deep Bottom — Fussell’s Mill: Fighting at Fussell’s Mill on August 14 and 16, 1864, diverted Confederate attention from Union attacks on the Petersburg Railroad.

The CRLC purchase of the Long Bridge Road Tract supports preservation of a continuous corridor of protected historic landscape associated with five Civil War battles. In particular, the property is associated with the United States Colored Troops’ actions during the Civil War and presents new opportunities for related research and education.

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Celebrating three DECA alumni during “DECA Month”

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November is “DECA Month” and to cap several activities that WCHS DECA has conducted this month, the chapter would like to promote the accomplishments of three DECA alumni.

Alexandra “Lexi” Davis

Alexandra “Lexi” Davis (2019) is currently a senior at James Madison University.  Lexi not only is a WCHS DECA alumna, but a past Chapter Historian officer as well. When asked how her past experiences in DECA have impacted her personal life, she replied, “DECA has taught me how to present formally, talk to people, and knowing how to sell myself to clients and employers”.  As to what advice she would give to a 1st year DECA member, Lexi stated, “put yourself out there as in getting involved in the community, compete in as many DECA events as you can, and try new things.”  Her favorite memory of DECA? Going to Orlando Florida to compete in the DECA International Career Development Conference, being around her friends throughout all her years in DECA, and managing the school store, Wildcats Corner.   Lexi was instrumental in having Wildcats Corner receive its initial Gold Level Certification as a school-based enterprise.  Although she is an engineering major at JMU, Lexi attributes her ability to present engineering project ideas to potential clients due to her involvement and success with DECA projects.

Leonard Maiden

Dr. Leonard F. “Len” Maiden (1950) was the 1st Chapter President of the Warren County High School DECA chapter. In 1949, Len was elected as the 1st High School President of National DECA.  After graduating from WCHS, he earned degrees from Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Virginia, and the University of South Carolina. He was a veteran of the United States Army. In 1965 he joined the University of South Carolina faculty where he retired as Professor Emeritus of the College of Education.  Before joining the faculty at USC, he served as a Virginia State Supervisor for Marketing (Distributive) Education where he mentored marketing teachers and DECA chapter advisors in the Front Royal/Winchester/Northern Virginia region. Throughout his career, Dr. Maiden never lost his love for DECA.  He volunteered for many years as a judge in DECA state conferences in both Virginia and South Carolina.  He mentored students learning to become teachers and teachers learning to improve their craft for many years.  In 2021, the WCHS DECA Chapter established an annual scholarship to be awarded to a graduating WCHS DECA senior in his honor.

Sarah Gardner

Sarah Gardner is a 2016 high school graduate and alumna of James Madison University (2020).  She is also a professional member of the WCHS DECA chapter.  While in high school, Sarah was a member of her high school DECA chapter and served as the chapter’s president her senior year.  She was also a district winner, 3-time state winner, and competed in DECA’s International Career Development Conference three times.  She has served Virginia DECA as a State Leadership Conference judge for three years.  Currently, Sarah is a Senior Marketing Coordinator with Carahsoft Technology Corp. in Reston, VA.  When asked how her high school DECA experiences helped to prepare her for life after high school, she responded, “DECA taught me how to present myself in a professional setting.”  “DECA also taught me time management skills – mentoring other people, planning and executing projects, and writing research papers – and how to apply constructive criticism in order to improve as a marketing professional”, she added.  When asked what advice she would offer a first-year DECA member, Sarah stated, “Don’t be afraid to fall short or fail.  Just put forth your best effort and learn from the results!”

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The Wildlife Center of Virginia to provide Thanksgiving meals for 100+ wild animals

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Staff at The Wildlife Center of Virginia are getting ready for a Thanksgiving feast for over 100 “guests”. Species on the “guest list” include Red-tailed Hawks, Eastern Screech-Owls, Bald Eagles, Black Bears, Deer Mice, and reptiles including Eastern Box Turtles, Eastern Ratsnakes, and a Snapping Turtle.

On November 25, the Center anticipates to be caring for approximately 90 patients and 20 resident education animals. Wildlife rehabilitators will be preparing and delivering meals, cleaning enclosures, and updating patient records.

Photo / The Wildlife Center of Virginia

Turkey, mashed potatoes, and cranberry sauce aren’t on the Wildlife Center menus – instead of a traditional family-style Thanksgiving meal, the Wildlife Center crew will make dozens of species-specific diets, which cater to each species’ needs and each patient’s particular preferences based on observations during their time as patients at the Center.


“The animals that we will be caring for this year include over 30 reptiles, over 20 birds of prey, and almost 20 squirrels” said Wildlife Rehabilitation Supervisor Kelsey Pleasants. “Most of these patients have been admitted after being hit by cars or caught by domestic pets. Many of them require weeks of intensive care and rehabilitation.”

While the rehabilitation staff are busy in the kitchen, Center veterinarians will provide medical care for patients in need – distributing and administering medications, cleaning wounds and changing bandages, completing daily checks, and other medical procedures – and remain ready for any new patients that might arrive. New patient admissions are always a possibility, any day of the year. By the time the staff go home to their Thanksgiving dinners, all 110 animals will be fed, watered, and cared for.

The Wildlife Center of Virginia is a non-profit hospital that is able to provide quality healthcare to wild animals in need through the generosity and support of caring individuals. “We’re so appreciative of the support of our donors that helps us to feed and care for each bird, mammal, and reptile,” said Pleasants.

To find out more about ways to support the Wildlife Center of Virginia’s work, the public can visit www.wildlifecenter.org.

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Legislative Update

Front Royal-Warren County Airport receives $790,000 in funding from infrastructure deal signed into law last week

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On the busiest air travel day of the year, U.S. Sens. Mark R. Warner and Tim Kaine (both D-VA) announced that airports in Virginia are expected to receive $399,740,660 in federal funds over the next five years as a result of the bipartisan infrastructure deal signed into law last week.

The funding will be distributed to Virginia airports over five years as follows:

• Washington Dulles International: $120,399,725
• Ronald Reagan Washington National: $116,734,485
• Richmond International: $35,608,215
• Norfolk International: $33,098,390
• Charlottesville-Albemarle: $15,444,835
• Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional: $14,977,645
• Newport News/Williamsburg International: $10,194,005
• Lynchburg Regional/Preston Glenn Field: $6,497,230
• Shenandoah Valley Regional: $5,066,130
• Manassas Regional/Harry P. Davis Field: $3,735,000
• Leesburg Executive: $3,735,000
• Virginia Highlands: $1,480,000
• Virginia Tech/Montgomery Executive: $1,480,000
• Culpeper Regional: $1,480,000
• Danville Regional: $1,480,000
• New River Valley: $1,480,000
• Blue Ridge: $1,480,000
• Chesapeake Regional: $1,480,000
• Hampton Roads Executive: $1,480,000
• Richmond Executive-Chesterfield County: $1,480,000
• Hanover County Municipal: $1,480,000
• Warrenton-Fauquier: $1,480,000
• Winchester Regional: $1,480,000
• Franklin Regional: $790,000
• Front Royal-Warren County: $790,000
• Twin County: $790,000
• Louisa County/Freeman Field: $790,000
• Luray Caverns: $790,000
• Mountain Empire: $790,000
• Accomack County: $790,000
• Orange County: $790,000
• Dinwiddie County: $790,000
• New Kent County: $790,000
• William M. Tuck: $790,000
• Mecklenburg-Brunswick Regional: $790,000
• Stafford Regional: $790,000
• Suffolk Executive: $790,000
• Tappahannock-Essex County: $790,000
• Middle Peninsula Regional: $790,000
• Emporia-Greensville Regional: $550,000
• Farmville Regional: $550,000
• Ingalls Field: $550,000
• Lee County: $550,000
• Tazewell County: $550,000
• Tangier Island: $550,000
• Lonesome Pine: $550,000
• Brookneal/Campbell County: $550,000

The funding represents Virginia’s share of $15 billion in direct grants to airports expected around the country as a result of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, a bipartisan, once-in-a-generation investment in our nation’s infrastructure and competitiveness that was negotiated by Sen. Warner and strongly supported by Sen. Kaine.


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Blue Ridge Wildlife Center Patient of the Week: Gray Treefrog

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Your outdoor plants may be full of surprises!

It’s that time of year where many people bring potted plants indoors for the winter, but that means it’s also the time of year when people realize they may have brought in more than just their plants!

Photos / Blue Ridge Wildlife Center

This Gray Treefrog experienced just that, as the plant he was hiding on was brought into a warm room for the winter.

Because of the warmer temperatures, this frog stopped preparing for winter and became much more active, finally being discovered by the homeowner.


Because the frog had become acclimated to warmer temperatures, and the lows have been below freezing, it was decided it would not be safe for the frog to be placed back outside. Instead, the frog was brought to us for us to overwinter until next spring.

Check your plants before bringing them inside! If you find an amphibious stowaway, give us or your local rehabilitator a call before taking further action, so we can best assess the health of the animal and give you the best advice, keeping weather and natural behavior in mind.

If you want to avoid potentially disturbing wildlife, bring in your plants early before temperatures drop too low. That way, if you find any stowaways, you can simply place them back outside with plenty of time for them to find a new winter home.

This Gray Treefrog is our 3,171 patient in 2021!

We are fortunate to be able to provide a safe environment for amphibians to overwinter – but it comes at a price.

Our patients can’t pay for their care, and we don’t receive state or Federal funding for what we do. We rely on your donations to help wild animals and return them to their wild homes.

Giving Tuesday is in one week! In addition to a match provided by Facebook, our generous board of directors will match Giving Tuesday donations up to $15,000!

Please, donate to BRWC on Tuesday, November 30th, to make a big impact for wildlife!

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Samuels Public Library offers free at-home COVID-19 tests

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Samuels Public Library joins 18 other libraries and library systems state-wide offering free at-home COVID-19 tests through a partnership with the Virginia Department of Health (VDH). The pilot program runs through Friday, December 31.

Individuals may pick up a virtually-guided Abbott BinaxNow COVID-19 Antigen Card Home Test at Samuels Public Library, use it in the privacy of their own home and receive digital test results in 15 minutes. A library card is not required to receive a test. The program is designed to increase access to COVID-19 testing, especially among rural and remote communities.

“We are thrilled to collaborate with VDH to provide this simple, accessible avenue for testing in Warren County,” says Michelle Ross, Executive Director of Samuels Public Library. “Libraries play an important role in public health by offering free access to information, this service strengthens and extends that role.”

The at-home test kit uses the eMed digital platform. Users will need an internet-connected device enabled with a camera and microphone (smartphone or laptop) to join a virtual testing session with an eMed assistant. The eMed assistant will guide users through the testing process. Once the test is complete, the user will receive results within 15 minutes and eMed will report the results to VDH.


Individuals may request a test through curbside pick-up or at the Samuels Public Library circulation desk. If you are demonstrating symptoms, please use curbside pick-up and do not enter the library. For safety reasons, tests may not be taken inside the library. The library’s public wireless internet is accessible in the parking lot. VDH recommends tests be used within two weeks to avoid expiration.

About Samuels Public Library

Samuels Public Library brings people, information and ideas together to enrich lives and build community. A 501(c)(3) organization, the library annually serves 200,000 visitors, checks out nearly 400,000 books, electronic and digital services, and provides essential computer access, wireless service and public meeting spaces for the community. To learn more, visit www.samuelslibrary.net or call (540) 635-3153.

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Virginia State Police urging motorists to be patient and put safety first this Thanksgiving

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For many Virginians, Thanksgiving is time to gather with friends and family, commiserate over the trials and tribulations of the previous year and to be truly thankful for blessings around us. These wonderful family moments often start with loading up the car and heading down the road. AAA predicts that 1.4 million Virginians will be traveling for the holiday, which is 11% more motorists than in 2020. With many of those travelers taking to the roadways, patience might be the most important thing to pack.

“With traffic on the roads increasing and many people anxious to get to their destination, I encourage all Virginians to be patient. Buckle up and take your time,” said Colonel Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “Your family wants you to arrive safely and in a frame of mind to enjoy all the holiday has to offer. Making sure you are driving the posted speed limit, driving for conditions and wearing your seatbelt are the best ways to stay safe on the road, so you can enjoy the holiday.”

To further prevent traffic deaths and injuries during the Thanksgiving holiday, the Virginia State Police will once again be participating in Operation C.A.R.E. – Crash Awareness and Reduction Effort. As part of the state-sponsored, national program, state police will be increasing its visibility and traffic enforcement efforts during the five-day statistical counting period that begins at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021, and concludes at midnight Sunday, Nov. 28, 2021.

The 2020 Thanksgiving Operation C.A.R.E. initiative resulted in troopers citing 4,930 speeders and 1,706 reckless drivers statewide. Virginia troopers charged 67 drivers for driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and/or drugs, and cited 498 drivers for failing to buckle up themselves and/or juvenile passengers.


There were 12 traffic fatalities during the 2020 five-day Thanksgiving statistical counting period and eight traffic fatalities during the same period in 2019.

This year, the Thanksgiving Holiday C.A.R.E. initiative falls within the annual “Click It or Ticket” campaign. This helps to further emphasize the lifesaving value of seat belts for every person in a vehicle.

With increased patrols, Virginia State Police also reminds drivers of Virginia’s “Move Over” law, which requires motorists to move over when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped alongside the road. If unable to move over, drivers are required to cautiously pass the emergency vehicle. The law also applies to workers in vehicles equipped with amber lights.

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Family Preservation Services

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

Groups Recover Together

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Main Street Travel

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Mountain Trails

National Media Services

Northwestern Community Services Board

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Examiner

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Salvation Army

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

Studio Verde

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

Front Royal
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Upcoming Events

Nov
27
Sat
9:00 am Newtown Holiday Market @ Trinity Lutheran Church
Newtown Holiday Market @ Trinity Lutheran Church
Nov 27 @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm
Newtown Holiday Market @ Trinity Lutheran Church
With the holiday season upon us, it’s time to search for that perfect gift to bring a beautiful smile to a certain someone’s face. Please plan a trip to the Newtown Holiday Market centrally located[...]
10:00 am Winter Tree Identification Works... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Winter Tree Identification Works... @ Sky Meadows State Park
Nov 27 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Winter Tree Identification Workshop: Botany and Bloom Series @ Sky Meadows State Park
Meet at Carriage Barn in Historic Area. Even after the chilly breezes of autumn have stripped them of their leaves, trees provide clues to their identification by way of their bark, leaf scars, and other[...]
11:00 am A Holiday Through the Centuries @ Sky Meadows State Park
A Holiday Through the Centuries @ Sky Meadows State Park
Nov 27 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
A Holiday Through the Centuries @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area Sky Meadows’ Historic Area comes alive with the sights, sounds and smells of the holidays. To kick off our holiday season, the Historic Area will be filled with the aroma of tasty holiday[...]
Dec
1
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 1 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
4
Sat
10:00 am Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Dec 4 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie at Strokes of Creativity. Tickets: CLICK HERE Cost: $80 for 6 weeks Dates: Thursdays – Oct 21, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18, Dec 4 Time: 10 am[...]
1:00 pm The Nutcracker 2021 @ Skyline High School
The Nutcracker 2021 @ Skyline High School
Dec 4 @ 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Nutcracker 2021 @ Skyline High School
Italia Performing Arts is pleased to announce its own student production of the seasonal ballet The Nutcracker, to be presented in Front Royal, VA, on Saturday, December 4th, 2021. 1:00 and 5:00 pm Tickets: $35[...]
4:30 pm Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Dec 4 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Meets in the Historic Area behind Mount Bleak. Discover our International Dark Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and[...]
Dec
5
Sun
4:00 pm Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ First Baptist Church of Winchester
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ First Baptist Church of Winchester
Dec 5 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ First Baptist Church of Winchester
Sunday, December 5, 2021 4:00pm First Baptist Church of Winchester 205 West Piccadilly St. | Winchester, VA 22601 COVID-19 Guidelines: Masks are required for attendees Friday, December 10, 2021 7:30pm Front Royal United Methodist Church[...]
Dec
8
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 8 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
10
Fri
7:30 pm Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Dec 10 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Friday, December 10, 2021 7:30pm Front Royal United Methodist Church 1 West Main Street | Front Royal, VA 22630 COVID-19 Guidelines: Masks are required for attendees Sunday, December 12, 2021 4:00pm Trinity Episcopal Church 9108[...]