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Council sends UPS parking proposal back to planning commission

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Town Council unanimously agreed Monday to return the re-worked proposal to the planning commission for further scrutiny. Photo and video by Mark Williams.

After several months of negotiations and an initial Front Royal Planning Commission recommendation of denial of a Conditional Use Permit request for an overflow commercial parking lot by UPS, that request is heading back to the Town’s planners.

According to a staff summary presented to council Monday evening, February 25, during discussion at the town council review level “UPS agreed to restrict tractor trailers from the subject property” and “restrict late hour use” there as well. The overflow lot would now be limited to employee parking as a consequence of the change.

Also due to the change, UPS removed a proposed barrier fence from its proposal.

The property in question is situated northwest of the existing UPS Distribution Center, behind the business park at west of the end of Portsmouth Road.

As a result of the major change to the UPS proposal made on February 13, about three weeks after the planning commission’s initial recommendation of denial, council unanimously agreed Monday to return the re-worked proposal to the planning commission for further scrutiny.

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Public decries golf course proposal; Warren County supervisors listen

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Local citizens prevailed in forcing members of the Warren County Board of Supervisors (BOS) to postpone action on a proposed golf course management agreement and lease during a public hearing at their February 18 meeting.

Specifically, the BOS postponed action on a proposal submitted by New Direction Golf Management Corp., which would manage and lease the County-owned and -operated Front Royal Golf Club for an annual $100,000 fee over an initial term of 36 months, with payments on the total due monthly, according to Warren County General Services Director Brandy Rosser.

At the end of the three-year term, New Direction also would have the option to extend the agreement and lease for another three-year term, with the annual fee dropping to $70,000 per year.
Many residents, however, denounced the BOS plan as a huge waste of money.

“We already have four other golf courses” in Warren County, said Gary Kushner, a Browntown, Va., resident who spoke during the public hearing on the proposal. “It’s not like we don’t have golfing opportunities in this county.”

Kushner also wasn’t happy about a Warren County plan “to pay somebody to make money off a County property.”

“It just seems crazy to me,” he said. “Normally, when you lease something to somebody you get a return on it. As I understand it, the contractor is going to take the profit out of this. The County’s not going to get anything.”

Kushner suggested that the item not be considered during the Tuesday night meeting and that the BOS conduct further analysis “on whether we want to keep this property at all and save $100,000 and see if the County can get a tax benefit out of it in the future.”

He also suggested that if the BOS does go forward with the proposal, a profit-sharing provision be added to the contract.

Front Royal resident Paul Gabbert agreed with Kushner, adding that the Front Royal Golf Course “will never, ever be a golf course that people from the city would come to play. It will never be a golf course that would take people away from the golf courses that are already here. There is no way. It’s a shame that [the property] has to stay a golf course when it’s not a money-making golf course and it never will be.”

Gabbert also said that while he didn’t know what the BOS could do with the municipal course, he suggested turning it into a large dog park.

Another speaker during the public hearing was Ginger Morrison Winkler of Charlottesville, Va., whose father Lynwood Morrison of Bentonville, Va., built both the local Shenandoah Valley Golf Club and the Bowling Green Country Club. Winkler said that she and her brother, Lynwood L. “Woody” Morrison Jr., continue to own and operate the Bowling Green Country Club.

Ginger Morrison Winkler said, “There are so many holes here in the county attempting to make a go of it and it would be ludicrous for anyone to think that we have not done all of the things” suggested by New Direction to bolster business.

Winkler acknowledged the legal implications associated with the Front Royal Golf Course, the property for which originally was gifted to the County with the stipulation that it remain a golf course. But, she said, “it seems out of control to keep this thing going.”

“I see it as a losing game,” she added.

Lynda McDonough of Linden, Va., also doesn’t think the proposed $100,000 yearly contract with New Direction is a good idea and asked that the BOS table the idea pending further consideration.

“Why can’t we just give it back to the family” who donated it, “and wash our hands of it,” McDonough asked the BOS.

On the other side of the situation was New Direction Golf Management President Mike Byrd, who told the BOS that it has “a wonderful asset in this community and unfortunately, it’s been a little under-utilized.”

In fact, according to data provided last night by Rosser, the Front Royal Golf Club has operated at an average yearly deficit of more than $100,000 from 2014 through 2018.
Nevertheless, Byrd said that New Direction has evaluated the course “very closely and we see that it could fit very nicely in this community, but most importantly, it’s going to be the leader in growing golf in this community.”

While there are plenty of golf holes in Warren County, he said, “what we need are a lot more golfers.”

Byrd thinks that under the leadership of New Direction, that’s exactly the goal that could be accomplished if the company’s submitted proposal is approved.

“We don’t run a golf course, so to speak,” Kenneth Roko said of Warren County. “We don’t have professionals there, we don’t have a big staff, we don’t cater to the golfing community on a regular basis.

Kenneth Roko of Middletown, Va., a member of the County’s Front Royal Golf Club Advisory Committee, said the group has gone through several iterations of what would be the best choice for oversight of the County’s municipal golf course.

“We have part-time staff there and that’s fine and dandy,” he said, “but if we want to make it grow, we really need to have those who do it for a living perform that service.”

Roko said the committee looked at the economic implications of having a management company run the County’s golf course that could reduce expenditures while growing the game for the area.

“New Direction offers a unique approach,” he said. “They use technology, they use social media, and they’re very savvy … they do a good job of attracting people not just from the surrounding area but from” elsewhere, including Northern Virginia.

Roko noted that hiring New Direction also would save the County money when compared to the yearly deficit it’s experienced over the last several years.

Kushner, however, said there’s an option that hasn’t been considered yet: not having a golf course at the 902 Country Club Road location in Front Royal at all.

Interim Warren County Attorney Jason Ham told the BOS that the proposed management and lease agreement between the County and New Direction was tweaked during the last week or so since the January BOS work session when the proposal was first discussed. He said the contract is in an “acceptable position” for action.

After some discussion, North River District Supervisor Delores Oates motioned for the BOS to postpone the item until its March 3 meeting “so that we can delve into it further,” Oates said, adding that she’d also like to better understand the legal implications of the bequeathing of the golf course by reading the will and testament of the donators.

Tony Carter, supervisor representing the Happy Creek District, gave the motion a second with the entire Board of Supervisors, including Oates, Vice Chairwoman Cheryl Cullers, Chairman Walter Mabe and Fork District Supervisor Archie Fox voting unanimously to postpone their review.

In other action on public hearing items, the BOS also postponed action on a requested conditional use permit for a short-term tourist rental at 64 Rocky Lane in Front Royal, which is owned by Brian and Ann M. Conley of Bentonville, Va.

Board Vice Chairwoman Cullers forced the Board’s postponement of action on the Conley’s request explaining that she wanted assurances from a nearby neighbor that he is on board with the property being used as a short-term rental.

While the Warren County Planning Commission received a signed letter from neighbors Elwood and Barbara Wines in August 2019, Supervisor Cullers wants to authenticate that Mr. Wines actually signed and understood the document, which says he and his wife understand that the Conley’s cottage is less than the Warren County-required minimum distance of 100 feet, but that they don’t object to the conditional use permit.

“I don’t want to drag this out,” Cullers said, “but I want to be comfortable with it.”

The golf course management agreement and lease public hearing are in this first Royal Examiner video. The second video is the complete Board of Supervisors meeting of February 18, 2020.


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Warren County budget process continues with requests from County Departments and Constitutional Officers: Airport, Sanitary Districts

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The Warren County Board of Supervisors held their second budget work session regarding the FY 2020-2021 budget on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. In this meeting, the Board of Supervisors heard from County Departments and Constitutional Offices. All members of the Board of Supervisors were present for this second meeting. County Administrator Doug Stanley and Assistant County Administrator Bob Childress also attended this second meeting.

In part 6, Stanley gave a brief overview before the first request from Northwest Community Services presented their budget request, followed by the Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

In part 7, the Building Inspections/Permits, the 26th District Circuit Court and the Commissioner of the Revenue presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

Ralph Rinaldi discusses the budget request from the Shenandoah Farms Sanitary District with the Board of Directors. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

In part 8, the Voter Registrar, County Treasurer, and Parks and Recreation presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 9, the Clerk of the Court, Commonwealth’s Attorney and the Virginia Cooperative Extension presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 10, Social Services and Fire and Rescue presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 11, County Administration, General Services and the Planning Department presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 12 we wrap up the second budget meeting with budget requests from Airport Services and the Sanitary Districts. This part is a long one – nearly two hours. It ends with some comments from Doug Stanley.

Watch the budget process on this exclusive Royal Examiner video.


Front Royal-Warren County Airport

The Front Royal-Warren County Airport (FRR) is nestled in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley on 90 acres where the Shenandoah River curves gracefully by the Blue Ridge and Massanutten Mountains. The Airport is located three miles southwest of Front Royal and fifteen miles south of Winchester. The facility is the home to Cass Aviation, the Randolph-Macon Academy Flight Training Program, the Skyline Soaring Glider Club, and Front Royal Aero Services.

The Airport’s location is just outside the Washington ADIZ which makes it attractive for low-stress flying. FRR has a 3,000-foot by 75-foot runway and offers 100LL aviation fuel. The airport has undergone an extensive improvement plan that includes a new terminal and ramp, resurfaced runway, a ten bay T-hanger, and a 16 bay jet pod unit in 2003. In addition, the Airport is part of the regional general aviation system serving the entire Eastern and Middle Atlantic United States and offers less than a one hour flying time to Baltimore, Maryland; Charlotte, North Carolina; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and New York, New York.

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Warren County budget process continues with requests from County Departments and Constitutional Officers: Administration, General Services, Planning

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The Warren County Board of Supervisors held their second budget work session regarding the FY 2020-2021 budget on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. In this meeting, the Board of Supervisors heard from County Departments and Constitutional Offices. All members of the Board of Supervisors were present for this second meeting. County Administrator Doug Stanley and Assistant County Administrator Bob Childress also attended this second meeting.

In part 6, Stanley gave a brief overview before the first request from Northwest Community Services presented their budget request, followed by the Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

In part 7, the Building Inspections/Permits, the 26th District Circuit Court and the Commissioner of the Revenue presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

Planning Director Taryn Logan presents her budget to the Board of Supervisors. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

In part 8, the Voter Registrar, County Treasurer, and Parks and Recreation presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 9, the Clerk of the Court, Commonwealth’s Attorney and the Virginia Cooperative Extension presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 10, Social Services and Fire and Rescue presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

Now, in part 11, we’ll hear from County Administration, General Services and the Planning Department in this exclusive Royal Examiner video.


County Administration

The Warren County Administrator’s Office directs the daily operations of the County government and engages in the long-range planning of governmental operations.

The County Administrator’s Office has responsibilities to the Board of Supervisors, to other County departments and personnel, and to the general public. Provides general information to the staff, boards and commissions and the public in general and coordinates volunteer program and community service programs

General Services

Warren County’s General Services Department was established during the fiscal year 2017-2018.  The Department manages the operations of Warren County Building and Grounds, maintaining all of the County’s facilities with the goal of keeping them neat, attractive, safe and hazard-free while providing a comfortable work environment for employees and an effective place for citizens to conduct County business.  The Department’s responsibilities include the general maintenance and janitorial services needed to ensure the proper upkeep of the County’s facilities.

In addition to Buildings and Grounds maintenance, the Department plays an active role in the implementation of the County’s Capital Improvement Plan, providing project management and staff support for many projects during construction.

Planning Department

The mission of the Office of Planning is to assist the community in developing the County to its best potential. Our staff evaluates and implements policies to support the goals of the community as it prospers and matures. The office is responsible for the review of development applications such as rezonings, special use permits, comprehensive plan amendments, zoning approvals, and zoning appeals and variances. Zoning approval is required prior to the construction of any new structure and any new business in an existing building.

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Warren County budget process continues with requests from County Departments and Constitutional Officers: Social Services, Fire & Rescue

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The Warren County Board of Supervisors held their second budget work session regarding the FY 2020-2021 budget on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. In this meeting, the Board of Supervisors heard from County Departments and Constitutional Offices. All members of the Board of Supervisors were present for this second meeting. County Administrator Doug Stanley and Assistant County Administrator Bob Childress also attended this second meeting.

In part 6, Stanley gave a brief overview before the first request from Northwest Community Services presented their budget request, followed by the Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

In part 7, the Building Inspections/Permits, the 26th District Circuit Court and the Commissioner of the Revenue presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

Fire Chief Richard E. Mabie presents his budget request to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 8, the Voter Registrar, County Treasurer, and Parks and Recreation presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 9, the Clerk of the Court, Commonwealth’s Attorney and the Virginia Cooperative Extension presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

Now in part 10, we’ll hear from Social Services and Fire and Rescue in this exclusive Royal Examiner video.


Social Services

Warren County Department of Social Services is a high performing agency committed to strengthening, supporting, and empowering families so that they can achieve their highest goals as part of the Warren County community.

Fire and Rescue Services

The Warren County Department of Fire and Rescue Services provide Fire and EMS response to the 38,387 citizens across the 216 square miles of Front Royal/Warren County, Virginia.  Utilizing the combination approach of career and volunteer Fire, EMS and Support personnel, we staff 8 individual volunteer Fire and EMS combination stations with 33 uniformed full-time career personnel, 20 part-time career personnel and approximately 70 volunteer response personnel. 

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Opinions and statistics from INSIDE the local tourism community contradict Town rationale for change

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Following lead-off batter Gary Kushner in a nearly 90-minute first-inning that saw 27 people step to the plate, 22 of 24 addressing the Front Royal Town Council and interim town manager’s fastball approach to downsizing and outsourcing several governmental functions, a number of pointed statements, questions and inquiries were made (sorry for the baseball analogy, the Astro’s World Series cheating scandal has my attention).

Second speaker Marie McDaniel introduced herself as a new resident of a year, who has fallen in love with the community and its people. She noted she had volunteered at the Town Visitors Center to learn more about her new community, observing, “That special place and the people who work there and volunteer are amazing. They all have a passion for promoting Front Royal, even with threats of unemployment hanging over their heads.”

The first of two Visitors Center volunteers, Marie McDaniel weighs in on what the Center and its staff mean to this community’s tourism marketing. Photo by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

Citing already fired Community Development Director Felicia Hart, Tourism Director Tim Smith and staff, she added, “They make the (Visitors) Center the heart and soul of this town … Don’t lose it the way we seem to lose dogs, cats, goats …” drawing applause as she concluded.

Joanne Kearney, a second Visitors Center volunteer followed, noting she had not been solicited by anyone to speak on their or the Visitors Center’s behalf. Pointing to a previous effort to outsource tourism promotion that did not work out, Kearney cited the negative impact of lost control of a key marketing tool from outsourcing.

“The town is our product, and our mission at the (Visitors) Center is to support the success of every business and attraction. New management may have a different mission … How will the town’s interests be protected and what oversight will there be on how your money is being spent? … Mr. Tederick reportedly said the government is not agile and creative enough to manage tourism, but the department staff HAS displayed creativity and agility in new outreach and initiatives … Tourism is this town’s lifeblood. The council should be INCREASING support for the department, not handing it off to an unknown quantity.”

Second Visitors Center volunteer Joanne Kearney concurred and elaborated on reasons she believes the Center and staff should remain an in-house function of the town government. Photo by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

Kearney pointed to the experience of other communities, as well as Front Royal’s, in unsuccessful efforts to outsource the tourism function in concluding, “This outsourcing stands to do more harm than good and could cost much more than it hopes to save, as many other municipalities have learned. Why repeat a course that has already been found unsuccessful … Consider the long-term ramifications and potential losses. Please reject the outsourcing plan and keep the staff and operations of tourism with the town, for the sake of the town,” again drawing wide applause at her conclusion.

Not ‘agile’ enough?

Front Royal/Warren County Appalachian Trail Community Committee Co-Chair Susan Tschirhart repeated concerns expressed in a committee co-chair letter to the mayor and town council, that as she noted was also printed in the “Opinion” section of the Royal Examiner website, in the immediate aftermath of the announced terminations and plans to outsource the Town’s tourism function.

AT Trail Community Committee Co-Chair Susan Tschirhart presents financial and AT Trail Community statistics to uphold the argument the Town Tourism function has, indeed, been agile and effective in promoting tourism in this community. Photo by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

But on February 10 she elaborated on those concerns to the council’s and its staff’s face. In that eyeball to eyeball meeting, she also presented numbers that appeared to contradict Interim Town Manager Tederick’s stated “not agile enough” rationale for sweeping changes like outsourcing, immediate terminations, and potential future firings related to the Town’s tourism function. In opening, Tschirhart pointed to momentum the community has developed related to its “AT Community” designation and the importance of the Town and County’s interrelationship in tourism marketing – an effort illustrated by the Joint Town-County Tourism Advisory Board which also met last week, though apparently also without any foreknowledge or information about the Town’s planned and partially implemented course of action on tourism.

“Our town and county were jointly designated an official AT Community by the Appalachian Trail Conservancy in 2012. Our committee of volunteers raises awareness of and support for trail-friendly local business, land-use policies that protect the trail and its views, and hiking as a healthy outdoor activity. AT Community designation has directly resulted in five new businesses, including three on Main Street, all of which are thriving. At this time, we are proud to partner with 22 businesses and organizations that have sought and earned AT Community Supporter certification …

“Not only did tourism attract $151 million in visitor expenditures to Warren County in 2018, a 4.9% increase over 2017, but, according to the Virginia Tourism Corporation, it supported 1700 jobs, a combined payroll of $23 million, and contributed $3 million to local tax coffers … Last week, based on 210 reviews, our Visitor Center was ranked second only to Skyline Caverns as top attractions in Front Royal. Do you know how unusual it is for a visitor center to rank as an attraction?” Tschirhart asked, adding pointedly, “And we’re about to fire that entire staff and change a recipe that has been steadily generating increased revenue for each of the past five years.”

The Front Royal Visitors Center is ranked as Front Royal’s second ‘attraction’ after the Skyline Caverns – an unusual designation for a Visitors Center, Tschirhart points out. Photo by Roger Bianchini.

And of that Town tourism budget already appropriated for the current fiscal year that runs to June 30, well into the hiking and tourist season, Tschirhart observed, “We were also puzzled to learn that the tourism budget for marketing and advertising has been frozen. This is money already allocated to the current fiscal year and critical to generating business for 170 tourism-dependent businesses in the county who count on the Visitor Center and its marketing materials and services to generate income. Eighty-five percent of Front Royal’s tourism budget is covered by lodging fees, all collected from visitors to our area. The remaining 15% comes from Front Royal promotional merchandise sold at the Visitor Center. None of our tourism department’s salaries or expenses come out of our own taxpayer dollars. Why are we cutting the tourism budget just as the tourism season is about to begin?” Tschirhart asked.

She also suggested that council and the interim town manager’s course of action flies in the face of, not only the Town’s own past experience with outsourcing tourism, but other Valley communities who have learned their lessons and are moving in exactly the opposite direction from the one five elected and two appointed town citizens have chosen to move this Appalachian Trail Community in.

“Berryville and Round Hill were designated AT Communities last year. Luray, designated just after Front Royal is now working toward moving its under-performing tourism department out from under its Chamber (of Commerce). In all of the other counties, tourism is handled by town/county government, and none are privatized,” Tschirhart told the town’s elected and appointed officials.

AT Trail Community Co-Chair Scott Jenkins, owner of Mountain Home B&B near the AT, adds to his co-chair’s call for the council to slow its and its staff’s rush to judgment on radical changes to tourism marketing. Photo by Roger Bianchini.

“Virginia’s recreation economy is booming. Roanoke is now positioning itself to compete with Asheville, North Carolina as a site for outdoor manufacturing. Damascus just broke ground for the Trail’s newest trail center. Situated between Damascus and AT headquarters in Harper’s Ferry, Warren County hosts one of the most popular section hikes along the trail’s 500-mile stretch in Virginia … The average thru-hiker along the AT will spend $5500 during the course of their hike, and another $4000 on gear. According to a 2010 survey, they’ll spend an average of $153 per town visit, a figure that has no doubt increased over the last 10 years.

“So, why all this effort to engage the outdoor industry?” Tschirhart asked rhetorically, answering her own question by noting, “Because it’s a $362 billion dollar industry driven largely by hiking, camping, and rock climbing, all of which can be found in abundance here … Nationally, revenue generated by the outdoor industry exceeds even oil and gas.

“To mix metaphors, Front Royal should be riding that wave, not starving the golden goose,” Tschirhart said in closing.

Another council gamble?

According to one councilman, Gary Gillespie’s, remarks delivered later as a justification of council actions on a number of fronts, including legally with the EDA and budgetary from year to year, “We work for the taxpayers of Front Royal first and foremost. Again, it’s our job to fight and protect your money.”

The unanswered question remains – will reducing operational costs so they can say they made capital improvements, often long-delayed ones, without raising taxes in the coming fiscal year REALLY save this community money in the long term OR simply set the stage for a huge corresponding loss of revenue from a tourism industry crucial to both the Town and County’s economic futures?

It appears this Front Royal Town Council majority continues its propensity for gambling:

1 – on “promises” of lower interest rates versus facts regarding the availability of those rates on its police headquarters construction project;

2 – on soaring taxpayer-funded legal costs to fight over whether those broken verbal “promises” from a now-indicted former EDA official hold any legal weight in the conduct of municipal and economic development business;

3 – and now, on whether reducing the town government’s operational tax revenue needs is really a money saver for the Town and the community in the long term.

Roll the dice …

Kushner outlined Town downsizing plan’s critique, if not tone as questions mount for elected officials

Town-County Tourism Advisory Board moves forward in a vacuum of information on Town plans

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Warren County budget process continues with requests from County Departments and Constitutional Officers: Clerk of the Court, Commonwealth’s Attorney, Cooperative Extension

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Angie Moore, Clerk of the Court, presents her budget request to the Board of Supervisors. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

The Warren County Board of Supervisors held their second budget work session regarding the FY 2020-2021 budget on Tuesday, February 11, 2020. In this meeting, the Board of Supervisors heard from County Departments and Constitutional Offices. All members of the Board of Supervisors were present for this second meeting. County Administrator Doug Stanley and Assistant County Administrator Bob Childress also attended this second meeting.

In part 6, Stanley gave a brief overview before the first request from Northwest Community Services presented their budget request, followed by the Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

In part 7, the Building Inspections/Permits, the 26th District Circuit Court and the Commissioner of the Revenue presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

In part 8, the Voter Registrar, County Treasurer, and Parks and Recreation presented their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.

Now, in part 9, we’ll hear from the Clerk of the Court, Commonwealth’s Attorney and the Virginia Cooperative Extension as they present their budget requests to the Board of Supervisors.


Clerk of the Court

The circuit court is the trial court of general jurisdiction in Virginia, and the court has the authority to try a full range of both civil and criminal cases.  Civil cases involve disputes essentially private in nature between two or more parties; criminal cases are controversies between the Commonwealth and persons accused of a crime.  Only in a circuit court is a jury provided for the trail of many of these disputes and controversies.

Commonwealth’s Attorney

The Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office works daily with Federal, State, and local law enforcement to fight criminal activity in Warren County and other jurisdictions.  By statute, the Commonwealth’s Attorney is the chief law enforcement officer of the jurisdiction in which he or she serves.

Virginia Cooperative Extension

The Warren County office of Virginia Cooperative Extension is your local connection to Virginia’s land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University. Through educational programs based on research and developed with input from local stakeholders, we help the people of Warren County improve their lives. We provide education through programs in Agriculture and Natural Resources, Family and Consumer Sciences, 4-H Youth Development, and Community Viability.

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Front Royal
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Upcoming Events

Feb
19
Wed
2:00 pm Rotary Club Blood Drive @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Rotary Club Blood Drive @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Feb 19 @ 2:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Rotary Club Blood Drive @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
All are invited to the Rotary Club of the Shenandoah Valley (The Area ONE|ders) blood drive on Wednesday, February 19th, from 2pm-7pm, at the Front Royal United Methodist Church (1 W. Main St. Front Royal)[...]
Feb
20
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 20 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, February 19 and Thursday, February 20: Come in for some great stories, songs, and a craft about our feathered friends, Birds!  Siblings welcome. Wednesday, February[...]
3:00 pm Cancer Care Center Ribbon Cuttin... @ Fauquier Health Center for Cancer Care
Cancer Care Center Ribbon Cuttin... @ Fauquier Health Center for Cancer Care
Feb 20 @ 3:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Cancer Care Center Ribbon Cutting and Open House @ Fauquier Health Center for Cancer Care
Fauquier Health will celebrate the opening of its new freestanding Center for Cancer Care with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and community open house this week. The new 25,640-square-foot center and equipment upgrades were made possible by[...]
Feb
21
Fri
9:00 am Entrepreneurship Workshop @ Luray-Page County Center
Entrepreneurship Workshop @ Luray-Page County Center
Feb 21 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm
Entrepreneurship Workshop @ Luray-Page County Center
Are you considering independent, corporate, or social entrepreneurship, or being groomed to take over a family business? Then, this workshop is for you! Topics to be covered: Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur The Importance of[...]
Feb
22
Sat
10:00 am Beginner Crochet: Dishcloths @ Strokes of Creativity
Beginner Crochet: Dishcloths @ Strokes of Creativity
Feb 22 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Beginner Crochet: Dishcloths @ Strokes of Creativity
Beginner Crochet: Dishcloths In this beginner level class, you will learn some basic crochet stitches and pattern reading to make pretty dishcloths for your home. Instruction will be for right-handed crochet. Please pre-register!
11:00 am Art Stars @ Samuels Public Library
Art Stars @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Art Stars @ Samuels Public Library
Art Stars is a special needs art discovery program. This program is for ages 8 and up. Registration begins January 22. Participants should have a caregiver or attendant present in the program.
12:30 pm Crochet Workshop @ Strokes of Creativity
Crochet Workshop @ Strokes of Creativity
Feb 22 @ 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Crochet Workshop @ Strokes of Creativity
Crochet Workshop Do you have a crochet project you need a little help with? Already bought the supplies, but need help reading the pattern? All skill levels are invited to this Bring Your Own Project[...]
1:00 pm Discover love, adopt at Petco @ Petco
Discover love, adopt at Petco @ Petco
Feb 22 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Discover love, adopt at Petco @ Petco
Stop by Petco located at 2580 S Pleasant Valley Rd. on Saturday, February 22, between 1 and 4 PM. Meet the amazing Petco adoption team from the SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke, learn more about[...]
1:00 pm Moving Mindfully: Finding and ke... @ Ruby Yoga
Moving Mindfully: Finding and ke... @ Ruby Yoga
Feb 22 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Moving Mindfully: Finding and keeping your footing @ Ruby Yoga
Join Ruby Yoga and Deborah Romero of Optimal Posture LLC for a series of workshops on moving more mindfully through life using the principles of yoga and the Alexander Technique. Slated for Saturday, Jan. 25,[...]
2:00 pm Magic Show @ Samuels Public Library
Magic Show @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 22 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Magic Show @ Samuels Public Library
Local magician Kevin Owens will entertain the whole family with his amazing magic show, which always includes audience participation and lots of laughter!