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EDA ends year on positive note; and says goodbye to Sealock

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The Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority ended 2016 on an upbeat after a year of frustration revolving around delays to Avtex site re-development.

At the EDA’s final meeting of 2016, Executive Director Jennifer McDonald told her Board, First, that the State Commonwealth Transportation Board had approved the Town of Front Royal’s application for Industrial Access funding for the West Main Street extension that could be worth as much as $500,000 in unmatched state funding for one of the primary access roads to the Royal Phoenix Business Park;

And Secondly, that a new Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Project Manager had given the okay for walking trails through the Conservancy Park section of the property.

Jennifer McDonald, gray sweater, cheers her board up with some positive news to close the year – at the top of the list is positive movement at Royal Phoenix; an expected road-ready Leach’s Run Parkway by April; and Town permitting approval of the EDA’s Workforce Housing Project. Photos/Roger Bianchini



During earlier monthly reports McDonald had already informed both the Front Royal Town Council and Warren County Board of Supervisors that final authorization of the first property sale to a commercial client, Information Technologies Solutions contractor ITFederal, had been authorized by the Department of Justice on September 23, 2016.

That authorization, which according to EPA officials required approval by all involved Avtex Superfund stakeholders, including the EPA/DoJ, the Town of Front Royal, Warren County, the EDA, and former owner and mandated cleanup partner FMC Corporation, was required to remove the ITFed parcel from a $2,060,000 lien on the property.  That lien is designed to provide some compensation to the feds and FMC for the millions of dollars in cleanup and remediation costs spent by both over a quarter century of work at the site.  The feds alone spent over $24-million there.

As first reported at Royal Examiner, the EDA request to remove the 30-acre ITFederal parcel from the lien to facilitate a one-dollar sale price was sent by then-EDA and Warren County attorney Blair Mitchell to the EPA on September 18, 2015.  Unfortunately for time considerations, long-time EPA Superfund Project Manager Kate Lose retired, leaving a vacuum of EPA leadership concerning the Avtex Superfund site just as the EDA request was made.  But with Fed sale approval and State road funding authorization now in place, along with a new Superfund Project Manager, things appear to be taking a positive turn.

Even State DEQ approval of a stormwater management plan vilified by outgoing Town Councilman Bret Hrbek as a primary delaying factor on November 28, was received over a year BEFORE Hrbek made his recent allegations of possible partisan hanky panky by the Democratic Governor’s Office.  According to a document provided to us by McDonald, DEQ verified the necessary permitting was in place under guidelines established in July 2014, on November 16, 2015.  The EDA-ITFederal sale negotiation wasn’t completed until September 2015.

McDonald has predicted ITFederal will start breaking ground this spring on the first of as many as eight buildings shown in their site plan.  Exactly what kind of businesses may occupy the bulk of space in those buildings remains a matter of unresolved contention on the Town Council.  BUT I guess the majority thought process is as they said in the baseball fable “Field of Dreams” – “Build it and they will come” … whoever “THEY” may be.

Other business

Despite low temperatures delaying the laying of the Leach’s Run Parkway road surface, McDonald said contractors remained confident the key north-south connector road on the Town’s east side would be ready for traffic by April.  The project deadline is June 24, 2017.

She also reported positive movement on the EDA’s Workforce Housing Project designed to provide 36 rental units in three buildings off an extension of Royal Lane on Front Royal’s south side.  The Front Royal Town Council gave final approval to a Special Exception Request for the extension of a dead-end cul d’sac road enabling the project on November 14.  Only Bébhinn Egger opposed the permitting, citing authorization of the construction project without attaching what her colleagues agreed were necessary road improvements to dead-end Royal Lane.  Royal Lane will require an extension to reach the currently landlocked property donated to the EDA in return for tax credits to the former owners.  Royal Lane already funnels traffic from nine single-family homes, 99 apartments and two commercial buildings onto John Marshall Highway.

EDA Board member Greg Drescher, who is also Superintendent of Warren County Public Schools, noted that 65 percent of new teachers hired by the system did not live in the county.  The primary rationale for EDA development and management of an apartment complex is the need for affordable housing for young professionals, most commonly cited as teachers and law enforcement officers.

McDonald also reported that the Railroad Workers Brotherhood located off Shenandoah Shores Road near the Happy Creek Commercial Park was seeking an exemption from parking requirements attached to a planned expansion of that facility.  She noted the RR Brotherhood would have to buy additional land for the expansion if they did not receive the permitting exemption from the Town.  McDonald said the building now houses office space essentially for one person.

EDA Board Chair Patty Wines presents Bill Sealock with a plaque of appreciation for his 5 years of service on the EDA Board of Directors. Sealock resigned the EDA Board to take the Front Royal Town Council seat he won in November. Photo/Roger Bianchini

The EDA Board and staff also bid farewell to Bill Sealock.  Sealock is resigning to take the seat on the Front Royal Town Council he won in the November Election.  Sealock was presented with a plaque and acknowledgement of his five years on the EDA Board. – “I’ll miss you all, we’ve had a good run,” he told his colleagues.  He added that as a Town Councilman he would not contribute to “silly fights with the County – it ought to be cooperative for both,” he said of the attitude he will take to Town Hall.

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Gaming: How something free makes money

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Whether you enjoy playing games on your smartphone, computer, or console, you’ve got tons of options, including free-to-play games. Some of the most popular games right now, including Genshin Impact, Forge of Empires, and Destiny 2, are free to play. So why would companies give away games? As is usually the case, there’s a catch.

Video game developers have perhaps perfected the use of free products to draw customers in, then upselling to drum up revenues. Bungie, for example, gives away the base Destiny 2 game for free.

As you get into the game, Bungie tempts you with expansion packs, such as Beyond Light, which adds new levels, worlds, and stories. The Beyond Light expansion typically retails for $39.99 and has topped sales charts on Steam and other platforms, according to pcgames.com

Besides expansions and add-ons, many developers also encourage people to make in-app purchases. You might buy a distinctive outfit for your in-game character or a special weapon, for example.


Another popular way to get customers paying is to offer a ‘loot box.’ You pay for the box, then open it up and find out what you got. Often, you’ll get costumes or weapons for your character. And in some cases, you’ll receive rare items. Some critics liken loot boxes to gambling, however. While some get great items, a lot of folks receive items not worth much.

Genshin Impact uses loot boxes, among other tactics, to drive sales within the free-to-play game. The game has pulled in over $2 billion in sales across PCs, consoles, and mobile platforms.

Free is free. Yet if you can upsell other products or services, you can pull in revenue.

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40th anniversary of the ‘Baby Bell’ breakup

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These days, if you want to make a phone call, you have plenty of choices in phones, service providers, minute plans, data plans, and pay-as-you-go plans.

Not so long ago, however, throughout much of the era of landlines, you had just one choice: AT&T.

Since the breakup of the AT&T monopoly, a choice has expanded exponentially. Costs have gone up. And it’s a lot more complicated these days to just talk on the phone.

Up until 1982, AT&T controlled almost the entire American telephone network under the Bell System. If you wanted a phone, you rented one from AT&T (and only AT&T) and connected primarily to AT&T telephone lines.


The break up of the Bell System was a long time coming, with AT&T facing lawsuits throughout the 20th century. AT&T worked with the American government to avoid breakups and reached milestone agreements in 1913 and 1956.

The 1956 consent decree agreement was particularly important, as AT&T was forced to focus on running the national telephone system and special projects with the government. They couldn’t enter other markets.

Still, AT&T protected its turf. For example, AT&T long fought to keep the Caterfone, a mobile communications system, from connecting to its telephone lines. Then in 1968, the FCC decided that Americans could connect any lawful device to telephone lines.

Tensions between AT&T, the government, and rival telephone companies continued to simmer before finally boiling over. In 1982, an agreement was reached to break up AT&T into regional rivals.

In exchange, the new Baby Bells would no longer be restricted to the national telephone system and could enter new markets, such as computers and later, the Internet.

These days, mobile phone networks are similarly dominated by the Big Four: AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile. The FCC found that these four companies soaked up 98 percent of mobile wireless service revenue in 2014.

Sprint has since joined forces with T-Mobile, further solidifying control. Still, consumers have alternate mobile service options today, such as Google Fi, which uses T-Mobile’s network, but is managed by tech giant Alphabet.

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The murky business of online gambling

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When you think about gambling, you might conjure up the bright lights on the Vegas strip, where the entire infrastructure was built around a person dropping a token into a machine.

Online gambling needs no such infrastructure or fancy hotel rooms. It relies entirely on the belief the customers have in fair software — and they really do believe. According to Forbes, online gaming topped $72 billion in 2021, up from $64 billion in 2020.

To put that into perspective, Las Vegas brought in just $2.1 billion in gambling revenue in the third quarter of 2021, a record-breaking sum.

So customers believe, but should they?


In a business that is designed to take money, there is no online gaming commission. Online casinos can’t be legally set up in the U.S. and Web publishers on any platform can’t accept gaming ads.

Illegal online gaming sites often have problems processing cash, since the biggest transaction companies won’t take their business.

Nonetheless, anyone can place a bet.

The problem with online gambling is that everything could be fake: The other players, the odds, the games, the payouts, the winners, and the dealers. It’s a world created by the software.

How do gamblers know if online casinos are even paying anything out? They don’t know. They can’t know if the software is set to some kind of win probability consistent with terrestrial casinos or not. While some gaming sites claim to be inspected by accounting and gaming industry firms, there is nothing to stop an online casino owner from paying nothing. After all, he controls the software.

But the customers still flow in. By 2025, projections suggest that the market will be worth $112 billion.

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COVID-19 relief may leave some with tax bills

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Each year, millions of people receive unemployment benefits. And each month, billions are paid out in benefits. Yet many folks fail to realize that they’re required to pay taxes on unemployment benefits, as the federal government and many states consider it taxable income.

The tax bills, both from the individual and government’s perspective, are no small matter. In September 2020 alone, the American government shelled out over $13 billion as people lost their jobs amid the global COVID-19 pandemic. While the government paid out $2.7 billion in September 2021, that’s still a large chunk of cash and will generate considerable tax liabilities.

During the pandemic, the government provided expanded unemployment benefits. However, those, too, could inflate your tax bill. The $600 expanded unemployment benefits provided by the CARES act and the $300 benefits from the later relief packages are considered taxable income.

There’s an important caveat, however. The American Rescue Plan offered a tax break on the first $10,200 of unemployment benefits so long as your (single or couple) adjusted gross income was less than $150,000. Keep in mind that this is a federal tax break, and you may need to pay state taxes.


How about the stimulus checks offered through the CARES Act and the American Rescue Plan? Those are not taxable as they are actually tax credits.

Taxes are (ideally) paid as you go. You should have been paying taxes on your income by sending money to the IRS while receiving benefits. You can pay monthly or make estimated quarterly payments. Waiting until tax day to pay may result in penalties.

Don’t have the cash to pay for your taxes? In some cases, the IRS offers taxpayers payment plans. However, you may face penalties and fees.

Even if you can’t pay your taxes, you must report the income and file tax returns. The federal government can charge you with crimes for failing to file taxes, and obviously, falsifying your tax returns can also result in charges.

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Supply chain woes hit small businesses

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Supply chain issues have caused problems for companies big and small. This October, at least 60 cargo ships idled off the California coast, waiting for berths to open up so they could drop off cargo. Costs to ship a single cargo container from China to the west coast of the U.S. rose from $3,000 to $20,000.

A National Federation of Independent Business survey in September found that 55 percent of small businesses reported that supply chain issues were worsening.

A Congressional report concluded that COVID-19 lockdowns caused many of the initial problems.

The U.S. Census Bureau’s Small Business Pulse Survey found 45 percent of businesses reported delays from domestic suppliers and nearly 20 percent reported delays from foreign suppliers.


Ultimately, supply and product woes will likely impact the bottom line. Small businesses, already facing tight profit margins and rising overhead from labor and other expenses, may struggle to absorb the additional costs.

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Smart TVs offer savvy advertising channels for small businesses

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We’ve got apps on our phones, apps on our computers, and now, we even have apps on our televisions. And if there’s an app, there may be a business opportunity. Smart TVs may offer ways for businesses big and small to connect with customers.

More devices are becoming “smart,” which, among other things, means they’re connected to larger networks (such as the Internet). Modern TVs are loaded with streaming apps, like Netflix or Peacock. Meanwhile, online retailers and others are offering apps too.

Take Amazon, for example. The online retail behemoth spent $11 billion on video and music content in 2020, up from $7.8 billion the year before. To put that in context, Netflix spent $10.81 billion on content in 2020 and $9.22 billion in 2019.

Why is Amazon spending so much on media content? Part of it is to advertise goods sold on Amazon through video and music ads. The small businesses that sell their goods through Amazon’s marketplace can pay for ads to get their products in front of customers.


Peacock and other platforms also allow small businesses to buy ad space. Traditional TV ads are expensive and collecting data is difficult. We can estimate how many people watch a given show through surveys. However, it’s challenging to gather more specific data, like who purchased a product due to a commercial.

With digital apps and platforms, it’s possible to measure and define customer actions. With an app, you can track when a customer clicks on an ad and buys a product. Rather than paying for commercial spots, businesses can pay for results, such as click-throughs or sales.

As smart TVs take over the living room, instead of merely showing a customer an ad for your awesome local pizza parlor, you can get them to order delivery right from their TV. Or when Amazon launches its upcoming Lord of the Rings series, small businesses selling on Amazon might advertise swords, independently published fantasy novels, and other related products.

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Down Home Comfort Bakery

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Family Preservation Services

Front Royal Women's Resource Center

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

Gourmet Delights Gifts & Framing

Green to Ground Electrical

Groups Recover Together

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Main Street Travel

Makeover Marketing Systems

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Mountain Trails

National Media Services

Ole Timers Antiques

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Examiner

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Oak Computers

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Salvation Army

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

St. Luke Community Clinic

Studio Verde

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

The Vine and Leaf

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

Front Royal
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Upcoming Events

Jan
20
Thu
7:00 pm FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
Jan 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
The Front Royal Women’s Resource Center presents: WomanGathering – 7 PM, Virtual via Zoom Webinar with guest Dawn Devine, the Executive Director for the Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum. Topic: Why Children are our most valuable resource. Click[...]
Jan
21
Fri
1:00 pm FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
Jan 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
January 21 – FRWRC Book Circle – Free Virtual Event – Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. Questions about FRWRC Online Book Circle, please contact: Lyn Bement at dlbement@comcast.net or (540) 635-3000. In person Book Circle Postponed until[...]
Jan
26
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 26 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Jan
28
Fri
12:30 pm Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and... @ ONLINE
Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and... @ ONLINE
Jan 28 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education @ ONLINE
Northwestern Prevention Collaborative, in conjunction with Northwestern Community Services Board, will offer a free, virtual REVIVE! Training on January 28th from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm. The one-hour online class provides an overview of how[...]
Feb
2
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Feb 2 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Feb
4
Fri
all-day First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Feb 4 all-day
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Come celebrate First Friday! Downtown businesses will be open late, until 8 p.m., on the first Friday and Saturday of each month.
Feb
5
Sat
all-day First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Feb 5 all-day
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Come celebrate First Friday! Downtown businesses will be open late, until 8 p.m., on the first Friday and Saturday of each month.
9:00 am Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Feb 5 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Women's Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Women’s Wellness Workshop – Virtual via Zoom Webinar – Key Note Speaker Dr. Neema. Registrations will begin January 5: frontroyalwomenswellness.com
4:30 pm Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Feb 5 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area: Discover our International Dark-Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and light conservation. Then join NASA Jet Propulsion[...]
Feb
9
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Feb 9 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]