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Meza resigns, council denies Lloyd’s ‘civil rights Emergency Ordinance’ proposal despite 49-2 public support

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Monday’s regular meeting of the Front Royal Town Council got off to an unexpected start when Valley Health employee Jacob Meza emotionally read a prepared statement resigning his seat, effective immediately, into the meeting record. Meza then exited stage right of the Warren County Government Center main meeting room to an affectionate farewell from his colleagues and rousing applause from a full house this reporter estimated at 150 people, there, for the most part, to comment on Councilman Scott Lloyd’s Emergency civil rights ordinance proposal to prevent Valley Health, and other private-sector employers within the town limits, from mandating employees to receive the COVID-19 Coronavirus vaccination at threat of termination.

Didn’t see that coming – Jacob Meza resigns his seat at meeting’s outset, and bid a fond farewell to his colleagues on his way out the door. Royal Examiner Photos by Roger Bianchini

Things turned ugly at the open meeting’s adjournment approaching 11 p.m. when a number of citizens verbally and loudly expressed their displeasure with the 3-2 vote of denial, Lloyd and Joe McFadden, the latter by remote hookup, dissenting.

Scattered boos and a loud “Evil Triumphs” was heard, along with “We won’t forget this” among other negative comments aimed at the council majority of Letasha Thompson, Gary Gillespie and
Vice-Mayor Lori Cockrell. That majority had prefaced their votes with explanations that legal research by the Town Attorney’s Office had indicated the Town has no legal authority to make such a legislative mandate in response to private-sector vaccine mandates, particularly in a Dillon Rule state like Virginia, where municipal authority cannot exceed what is authorized to it by the state government.


As the open meeting ended somewhat boisterously and the council prepared to enter the closed session, FRPD maintains a presence to assure that public peace and tranquility are restored.

And as Town Attorney Doug Napier had explained during the work session discussion, the state is authorized legally by code and/or its Constitution to mandate vaccines during a public health crisis. That legally hamstrings municipal governments from attempting to counter public health emergency vaccine mandates.

After the two-phased public comments on the Lloyd proposal lasting 3-hours-and-2 minutes – broken into two sections to facilitate council taking care of other business including two public hearings – Mayor Chris Holloway called for a motion. After an extended silence and a second call for a motion, Lloyd made the motion to approve his ordinance proposal. It was seconded by McFadden, whose father Tom was the second of 49 speakers in favor of the ordinance proposal.

Gillespie observed that he felt the Lloyd initiative countered the conservative Republican principle of limited government he, and other Republican conservatives espouse.

Speaking first following Lloyd’s motion to approve his emergency ordinance proposal, reading from a prepared statement Thompson told the audience that, not only did council not have the legal authority to pass such legislation, but that passing it would not protect the Valley Health employees who spoke in favor of Lloyd’s proposal, including doctors, nurses and nurse practitioners, from termination by their employer. While stating she personally believed in choice on medical decisions, as her vote with council in not mandating town employees to be vaccinated indicated, she observed that “Freedom goes in both directions”. She elaborated that in Virginia as a “Right to Work” state limiting union influence, employees anywhere can be fired for virtually any reason an employer might cite.

A council divided – Scott Lloyd did have one crossover vote from what seemed to be initial unanimous opposition to the legality of his anti-vaccine mandate ordinance proposal, but Joe McFadden was connected remotely. Lloyd might have been pondering what might have been different had that sixth council seat not been vacated at the meeting’s outset.

Thompson said that with the facts before them, she did not believe voting to approve the ordinance “to make everyone in the room happy” was “the right thing to do.”

In fact, Thompson cited Lloyd’s insistence in bringing his legislative initiative to a vote despite the lack of legal grounds for it as “political theater” geared toward the councilman’s personal agenda, which she had confronted him about at the July 12 work session perhaps being beyond the boundaries of the Town of Front Royal. As has been previously reported, Lloyd has past national political exposure, serving as the Trump Administration’s Director of Refugee Resettlement during a particularly controversial period at the southern border when refugee/immigrant children were being incarcerated separately from their parents or guardians who had entered the country illegally as administration policies delayed legal entry at prescribed border crossings for weeks.

Lloyd has noted he did not create the child-separation policy and was simply in the administrative position to implement it. He has also publicly noted he is far from a “zero-tolerance” stance on immigration.

A minority of two

However, one of the two people speaking against Lloyd’s anti-vaccine-mandate ordinance, Stevie Hubbard, ended her comments by loudly saying that whatever Lloyd did to protect personal liberties as a councilman, “Won’t make up for what you did to those kids at the border.”

When Hubbard cited COVID-19 case-fatality statistics found at the Virginia Health Department website to counter some of the pro-ordinance statistics presented by the anti-vaccine mandate majority, a number of people laughed derisively at her source.

Many of the pro-ordinance speakers reflected skepticism of, not only government information on the Coronavirus pandemic, but media coverage of it, as well as any legal roadblocks to the approval of Lloyd’s effort to counter the Valley Health COVID-19 vaccine mandate or others.

Councilman Lloyd, far left, and the second speaker against his ordinance proposal, Stevie Hubbard, weren’t seeing eye to eye on a variety of levels.

In addition to Hubbard, speaking against Lloyd’s proposal was Gene Kilby, whose family was at the center of fighting the local “massive resistance” effort to prevent the racial integration of Warren County Public Schools in the late 1950s, early ‘60s. In fact, Kilby observed, “This community has a history of going against the grain. It’s almost reminiscent of back in the day with the massive resistance problem.

“The State mandated that the schools be integrated. But because of groups like this (the county) built massive resistance, which was totally illegal,” he reminded council of the eventual legal outcome, adding that while he agreed people “should have their choice” that a final legislative decision must be grounded “in the rule of law – and you must act in the best interest of the general public,” Kilby concluded to a smattering of applause.

As the 31st speaker, Gene Kilby stated the first public opposition to the anti-Covid vaccine mandate at Monday’s meeting. Kilby urged the council to ‘act in the best interest of the general public’ rather than what he saw as a ‘special interest group’ with its own political agenda.


A majority of 49

John Lundberg opened the public comments on the Lloyd ordinance first citing an oft-revisited assertion that available COVID-19 vaccines were “experimental drugs” not yet approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) due to the public health emergency pace at which the vaccines were made available to the public.

John Lundberg was the first Public Concerns speaker and set a tone that COVID-19 vaccines remain ‘experimental drugs’ pending FDA approval despite their release under a state emergency public health order.

Some speakers claimed there were more traditional options “safer than Ibuprofen” available as an alternative to the vaccines. Others said that masking and social distancing were more effective barriers against COVID-19 contagion than the vaccine has proven to be.

A number of speakers raised religious belief as grounds not to accept a vaccine mandate. Others were critical of the religious exemption form Valley Health uses to determine if employees qualify for such exemption. “What’s next,” another asked, “are they going to go after our churches and tell us we can’t worship God?!?”

Manuel Vincente called the approaching vote on Lloyd’s proposal “a choice between liberty and fascism”. As for legal precedents against passage, Vincente said the U.S. Supreme Court had “decided in favor of genocide over and over again” in legalizing abortion.

Manuel Vincente took a tour down memory lane in making an analogy between his native country Cuba’s oppression of dissidents under Communist rule.

One speaker called COVID-19 “the Communist Chinese Virus”, while Matt Morrazzo referred to it as “the Wuhan-Fauci virus”. Gene McGirk later playfully criticized that reference “for giving Wuhan top billing”.

Morrazzo also wondered if the next step beyond vaccine mandates wouldn’t be “vaccine passports” you will need to go anywhere or do anything – “The infantry will be coming for all our rights,” he worried if the Coronavirus mandate trend continued.

Recently appointed Warren County School Board member Melanie Salins cited a COVID-19 vaccine packaging warning not to take it if allergic to any of its ingredients, observing that the vaccine package insert did not list the ingredients – “You can’t give informed consent if you’re not informed,” Salins said to applause. She compared Valley Health’s vaccine mandate to a legal definition of “assault” as “physical contact that happens without your explicit and voluntary consent”, drawing more applause. She concluded by asserting that the vaccine mandate violated “the Nuremberg Code” on medical ethics established after World War II in reaction to Nazi medical experiments conducted on imprisoned Germans or conquered populations.

Many Valley Health employees became emotional pondering the choice they were being given to accept the vaccine or face termination. Many wondered how frontline workers such as themselves had gone from being “heroes” for their efforts against the pandemic to targets for termination for their belief the vaccines are dangerous, not adequately tested, immorally developed, or in violation of their religious beliefs.

This mother, Michelle Scheutzow, worried that eventually she might be mandated to have her 20-month-old child, who has his own medical issues having survived 3 open heart surgeries, COVID-vaccinated without proper information on its potential dangers to him. Below, during a break, Councilman Lloyd speaks with supporters.

In arguing for his proposal, policy attorney Lloyd echoed some public comments in support of the emergency ordinance proposal, saying just because something had been ruled illegal in the courts, didn’t make it right or unchallengeable. While admitting the Town did not yet know whether its Virginia Municipal League municipal liability insurance would cover such a legal challenge of state authority on the matter, he offered to represent the Town in any subsequent legal challenge of his ordinance, if passed Monday night, and VML insurance paid attorneys ended up not being available to the Town.

Following the roll call vote and 3-2 defeat of Lloyd’s ordinance proposal by the now-five member council, as the angry and disappointed crowd disbursed, one man yelled at Councilwoman Letasha Thompson, who yelled back “watch your mouth” telling him not to “disrespect” her from the floor of Government Center meeting room. That only led to an escalating exchange leading to the man’s escort from the building by the Front Royal Police. Involved officers said the man was not arrested as he was compliant and settled down after their arrival.

Mayor Holloway and Councilman Gillespie point to man verbally berating Letasha Thompson for her role in defeating the ordinance proposal. Below, under the watchful eye of town police, the man counters that he’ll call who he wants, what he wants until that law enforcement presence suggested he drop that strategy.

See all the action, explanations, opinions, concerns on this important matter to the community, along with other business including the tabling of action on changes to the Town’s Special Events Code to further work session discussion, in the linked Town video.

Two downtown businessmen, Royal Cinemas Rick Novak and C&C Frozen Treats William Huck addressed the draft Special Events code, urging council to take more care in formulating a final draft regarding issues raised about a rating-approval matrix system seemingly geared toward larger, tourism and revenue-generating events at the perceived expense of smaller, community events.

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VSP 4:30 pm update on traffic crashes and disabled vehicles

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During the current winter storm impacting the Commonwealth, Virginia State Police troopers have responded to 369 traffic crashes and 282 disabled vehicles since 12:01 a.m. Sunday (Jan. 16) through 4:30 p.m. Sunday (Jan. 16). The majority of those crashes have involved only damage to vehicles. There have been no reported traffic fatalities during this time period.

Photo courtesy of Virginia State Police.


Since midnight on Sunday (Jan. 16), Virginia State Police have responded to:

Richmond Division: 28 Disabled Vehicles & 118 Traffic Crashes
At 1:40 p.m. Sunday, VSP narrowly escaped injury in Goochland County. The trooper was traveling east on I-64 when a vehicle tried to pass it. The vehicle lost control and struck the trooper’s patrol car at the 150-mile marker. No injuries were reported.



Culpeper Division: 37 Disabled Vehicles & 29 Traffic Crashes (Photo from Shenandoah County attached… crash with minor injuries.)

Appomattox Division: 41 Disabled Vehicles & 43 Traffic Crashes

Wytheville Division: 55 Disabled Vehicles & 59 Traffic Crashes

Chesapeake Division: 25 Disabled Vehicles & 26 Traffic Crashes

Salem Division: 60 Disabled Vehicles & 53 Traffic Crashes
At 3:25 p.m. Sunday, VSP responded to a multi-vehicle crash in Montgomery County. Four tractor-trailers and a pickup truck collided in the northbound lanes of Interstate 81 at the 127-mile marker. Two minor injuries were reported. The crash remains under investigation.

Fairfax Division: 36 Disabled Vehicles & 41 Traffic Crashes

As the storm continues to cross the state, Virginians are still advised to avoid travel Sunday and overnight into Monday, especially along the Interstate 81 corridor. Open highways allow VDOT crews to safely and effectively treat the roads.

If you MUST travel during the storm, please take these safety tips into consideration:

• Know Before You Go! Before heading out, check Virginia road conditions at www.511virginia.org or download the VDOT 511 app. Do not call 911 or #77 for road conditions. Please leave these emergency lines open for emergencies only.

• Clear ALL snow and ice from the roof, trunk, hood, and windows of your vehicle – car, SUV, minivan, pickup truck, commercial vehicle – before you travel.

• Use your headlights – in rain and snow. Virginia law requires headlights on when your wipers are active.

• Drive for conditions – slow your speed and increase your traveling distance between the vehicle ahead of you.

• Always buckle up.

• Avoid distractions – put down the phone.

• As the storm moves through the state, there will be an increased chance of encountering emergency vehicles assisting motorists. If it is safe to do so, carefully move over and give these responders plenty of room to safely work.

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Izzy’s arrival in Virginia nets 142 traffic accidents State Police have responded to before 1 PM

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During the current winter storm impacting the Commonwealth, Virginia State Police troopers have responded to 142 traffic crashes and 162 disabled vehicles since 12:01 a.m. Sunday (Jan. 16) through 12:45 p.m. Sunday (Jan. 16). The majority of those crashes have involved only damage to vehicles. There have been no reported traffic fatalities during this time period.

Photos courtesy of Virginia State Police

Since midnight on Sunday (Jan. 16), Virginia State Police have responded to:

Richmond Division: 12 Disabled Vehicles & 30 Traffic Crashes


Culpeper Division: 21 Disabled Vehicles & 6 Traffic Crashes (Photo from Culpeper County attached… crash with no injuries.)

Appomattox Division: 17 Disabled Vehicles & 20 Traffic Crashes

Wytheville Division: 45 Disabled Vehicles & 36 Traffic Crashes

Chesapeake Division: 18 Disabled Vehicles & 11 Traffic Crashes

Salem Division: 29 Disabled Vehicles & 32 Traffic Crashes
Virginia State Police remain on the scene of a multi-vehicle backup on Interstate 81 in Roanoke County. At approximately 12:05 p.m. Sunday, a tractor-trailer jackknifed and the cab disconnected from the trailer in the northbound lanes of I-81 at the 134-mile marker. A wrecker is on the scene working to get the tractor-trailer re-connected, so the northbound lanes can be cleared and traffic can begin moving again. However, in the backup of traffic, there are two additional reported traffic crashes – one with minor injuries reported and the other with no reported injuries. Fire and EMS have responded to the scene. Please follow 511 Salem for information on the detour.

Fairfax Division: 20 Disabled Vehicles & 7 Traffic Crashes

As the storm continues to cross the state, Virginians are still advised to avoid travel Sunday and overnight into Monday. especially along the Interstate 81 corridor. Open highways allow VDOT crews to safely and effectively treat the roads.

If you MUST travel during the storm, please take these safety tips into consideration:
• Know Before You Go! Before heading out, check Virginia road conditions at www.511virginia.org or download the VDOT 511 app. Do not call 911 or #77 for road conditions. Please leave these emergency lines open for emergencies only.
• Clear ALL snow and ice from the roof, trunk, hood, and windows of your vehicle – car, SUV, minivan, pickup truck, commercial vehicle – before you travel.
• Use your headlights – in rain and snow. Virginia law requires headlights on when your wipers are active.
• Drive for conditions – slow your speed and increase your traveling distance between the vehicle ahead of you.
• Always buckle up.
• Avoid distractions – put down the phone.
• As the storm moves through the state, there will be an increased chance of encountering emergency vehicles assisting motorists. If it is safe to do so, carefully move over and give these responders plenty of room to safely work.

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VDOT: Avoid all travel on Sunday afternoon into Monday morning in the Shenandoah Valley

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 Snow, ice, sleet, and rain are forecasted to enter the Commonwealth overnight and continue throughout the day Sunday. Precipitation combined with freezing temperatures will create treacherous driving conditions. The Virginia Department of Transportation is urging motorists to adjust travel plans and avoid being on the roads at all on Sunday, Jan. 16.

The current forecast indicates this event will drop significant snow, followed by freezing rain and ice in many areas, targeting the central region of Virginia and areas along the Interstate 81 corridor with the most extreme conditions.

The region, including Interstate 81, has terrain with steep grades that can increase the hazardous nature of travel during a heavy snow and ice event. This is very true for truck traffic and it is important that trucks avoid the region, particularly I-81, on Sunday and into early Monday.

Crews are conducting final stages of pre-treatment on interstates, primary and major secondary roadways statewide in advance of the storm and stand ready with the necessary equipment and adequate materials to clear and treat affected areas during and after precipitation falls.


VDOT crews and contractors will be prepositioned on Sunday to begin plowing and treating roads as the weather begins. Wreckers have been staged and tree crews have been notified for deployment as needed.

VDOT reminds motorists, bridges and overpasses freeze before roadways. If there is snow or ice on roadways, travel is hazardous.

With the risk of high winds, contractors are on standby to assist with downed trees, branches, and debris. Downed trees and power lines are expected and pedestrians and motorists should remain aware and cautious of these risks.

Remember:

  • Avoid travel
  • If you must travel during adverse weather conditions:
    • Review forecasts along your entire route
    • Allow plenty of time to reach your destination
    • Review and be familiar with alternative routes to your destination
    • Do not pass snowplows
    • Give crews time and room to treat roads
  • Visit 511Virginia.org for the latest road conditions before traveling. If possible, avoid travel until precipitation stops and road conditions improve.

For more information on winter weather travel, visit virginiadot.org/travel/snow.asp.

VDOT has a variety of traveler resources including Welcome Centers and Safety Rest Areas located throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Rest area locations can be found on the VDOT website at https://www.virginiadot.org/travel/map-rest-area.asp.

Road conditions and traffic cameras can be found on the VDOT 511 website at http://www.511Virginia.org, Roads with snow conditions will be marked minor, moderate, severe, or closed.

Road condition definitions:
Closed – Road is closed to all traffic.
Severe – drifting or partially blocking the road.
Moderate – snow or ice on major portions of the roadway.
Minor – bare pavement except for isolated spots of snow, ice, or slush. Driving with caution is recommended.

 

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Governor Glenn Youngkin signs 11 Day One Executive Actions

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Executive Orders:

• Executive Order Number One delivers on his Day One promise to restore excellence in education by ending the use of divisive concepts, including Critical Race Theory, in public education.

• Executive Order Number Two delivers on his Day One promise to empower Virginia parents in their children’s education and upbringing by allowing parents to make decisions on whether their child wears a mask in school.

• Executive Order Number Three delivers on his Day One promise to restore integrity and confidence in the Parole Board of the Commonwealth of Virginia.


• Executive Order Number Four delivers on his Day One promise to investigate wrongdoing in Loudoun County.

• Executive Order Number Five delivers on his Day One promise to make government work for Virginians by creating the Commonwealth Chief Transformation Officer.

• Executive Order Number Six delivers on his Day One promise to declare Virginia open for business.

• Executive Order Number Seven delivers on his Day One promise to combat and prevent human trafficking and provide support to survivors.

• Executive Order Number Eight delivers on his Day One promise to establish a commission to combat antisemitism.

• Executive Order Number Nine delivers on his Day One promise to withdraw from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI).

Executive Directives:

• Executive Directive Number One delivers on his fulfilling his Day One promise to jumpstart our economy by cutting job-killing regulations by 25 percent.

• Executive Directive Number Two delivers on his fulfilling his Day One promise to restore individual freedoms and personal privacy by rescinding the vaccine mandate for all state employees.

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Omicron is an Emergency – Here’s How You Can Help

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As we enter year three of the pandemic, the caregivers of Valley Health continue to stand tall in supporting our community through successive waves of COVID-19. During the initial wave of cases, our team managed through personal risk, caring for a new and terrible disease in a world short of answers. In the winter of 2021, our clinicians learned to incorporate COVID-19 care safely into our normal workflow and did both brilliantly. Others worked in the community, partnering with volunteers to give 150,000 COVID vaccines. During the Delta wave, we learned to deliver lifesaving treatments and again rose to the challenge of then-record volumes.

Now we face a new set of challenges. There has been a lot of talk that the Omicron variant is twice as contagious and half as deadly. Broadly, this is true. What you may not have heard is how that impacts your local health system’s ability to care for you and your family.

Omicron generally creates mild illness in the vaccinated (even milder if you are boosted) but can still cause severe disease in the unvaccinated, especially in high-risk groups (those who are older, with chronic illnesses, pregnant, or overweight). This has led to the community letting its guard down and to the explosive growth of cases outside the hospital. With so many cases in the community, we are seeing a higher number of very sick hospitalized patients than at any time in the pandemic, even though the average case is milder. We need your help.

We are working hard to increase the availability of home tests for COVID. These are for people with symptoms who are wondering if they have the virus. If you test positive, you very likely have COVID. You should act as if you do and you do not need further testing. You should immediately isolate to prevent spreading the disease to others.


If you test negative, you should wear a mask, social distance, and retest in a few days if symptoms continue. A second negative means you are unlikely to have COVID. As always, see a doctor for symptoms that are persistent, worsening, or otherwise concerning. If you have COVID and are in a high-risk group (as above) contact your primary care doctor to discuss treatment options.

If you are an employer, please do not require employees to get PCR tests or have physician visits related to employment needs. These are unnecessary and make it harder for people who are sick to get needed care. The CDC now recommends that people with COVID can return to work 5 days after the onset of symptoms if they are feeling better and have no fever. They need to wear a mask for 5 additional days. For additional guidance, visit www.cdc.gov/coronavirus.

Lastly, please consider getting vaccinated and boosted. Nearly 90% of hospitalized COVID patients are unvaccinated, including nearly all hospitalized patients under 75. Do this for yourself and do it for your family. It’s worth it.

Jeffrey Feit, MD
Valley Health Population and Community Health Officer

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VDOT: Warren County Traffic alert for January 17 – 21, 2022

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The following is a list of highway work that may affect traffic in Warren County during the coming weeks. Scheduled work is subject to change due to inclement weather and material supplies. Motorists are advised to watch for slow-moving tractors during mowing operations. When traveling through a work zone, be alert to periodic changes in traffic patterns and lane closures.

*NEW* or *UPDATE* indicates a new or revised entry since last week’s report.

INTERSTATE 66
*NEW* Mile marker 0 to 8, eastbound and westbound – Possible shoulder closures for litter pickup operations, Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

INTERSTATE 81
*NEW* Mile marker 299 to 300, northbound and southbound – Mobile right shoulder closures for survey operations, Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
*NEW* Mile marker 300 to 299, southbound – Right shoulder closures for sign work, Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


PRIMARY ROADS
No lane closures were reported.

SECONDARY ROADS
No lane closures were reported.

Various roads – Flagger traffic control for utility tree trimming, weekdays during daylight hours.

Vegetation management may take place district-wide on various routes. Motorists are reminded to use extreme caution when traveling through work zones.

Traffic alerts and traveler information can be obtained by dialing 511. Traffic alerts and traveler information also are available at www.511Virginia.org.

The VDOT Customer Service Center can assist with reporting road hazards, asking transportation questions, or getting information related to Virginia’s roads. Call 800-FOR- ROAD (800-367-7623) or use its mobile-friendly website at my.vdot.virginia.gov. Agents are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Down Home Comfort Bakery

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Family Preservation Services

Front Royal Women's Resource Center

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

Gourmet Delights Gifts & Framing

Green to Ground Electrical

Groups Recover Together

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Main Street Travel

Makeover Marketing Systems

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Mountain Trails

National Media Services

Ole Timers Antiques

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Examiner

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Oak Computers

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Salvation Army

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

St. Luke Community Clinic

Studio Verde

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

The Vine and Leaf

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

Front Royal
28°
Snow Shower
7:28am5:17pm EST
Feels like: 21°F
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Humidity: 93%
Pressure: 29.1"Hg
UV index: 0
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Upcoming Events

Jan
19
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 19 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Jan
20
Thu
7:00 pm FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
Jan 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRWRC Woman Gathering @ ONLINE
The Front Royal Women’s Resource Center presents: WomanGathering – 7 PM, Virtual via Zoom Webinar with guest Dawn Devine, the Executive Director for the Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum. Topic: Why Children are our most valuable resource. Click[...]
Jan
21
Fri
1:00 pm FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
Jan 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
FRWRC Book Circle @ ONLINE
January 21 – FRWRC Book Circle – Free Virtual Event – Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. Questions about FRWRC Online Book Circle, please contact: Lyn Bement at dlbement@comcast.net or (540) 635-3000. In person Book Circle Postponed until[...]
Jan
26
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Jan 26 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Jan
28
Fri
12:30 pm Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and... @ ONLINE
Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and... @ ONLINE
Jan 28 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Free REVIVE! Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education @ ONLINE
Northwestern Prevention Collaborative, in conjunction with Northwestern Community Services Board, will offer a free, virtual REVIVE! Training on January 28th from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm. The one-hour online class provides an overview of how[...]
Feb
2
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Feb 2 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Feb
4
Fri
all-day First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Feb 4 all-day
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Come celebrate First Friday! Downtown businesses will be open late, until 8 p.m., on the first Friday and Saturday of each month.
Feb
5
Sat
all-day First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Feb 5 all-day
First Friday @ Downtown Main Street
Come celebrate First Friday! Downtown businesses will be open late, until 8 p.m., on the first Friday and Saturday of each month.
9:00 am Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Women’s Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Feb 5 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Women's Wellness Workshop @ ONLINE
Women’s Wellness Workshop – Virtual via Zoom Webinar – Key Note Speaker Dr. Neema. Registrations will begin January 5: frontroyalwomenswellness.com
4:30 pm Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Feb 5 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area: Discover our International Dark-Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and light conservation. Then join NASA Jet Propulsion[...]