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The Down Home Comfort Bakery: Down home comfort with all natural ingredients

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On November 6, the Warren County High School DECA Chapter conducted a “Job Shadowing Day” with local businesses in Front Royal. Twenty-six students shadowed owners, managers, and employees in twelve locally owned businesses. During this week, “Global Entrepreneurship Week”, we will be spotlighting some of our successful local business entrepreneurs.

Businesses participating in this job shadowing activity included:

  • Blake & Co.
  • C & C Frozen Treats
  • Down Home Comfort Bakery
  • Jack Evans Chevrolet
  • Main Street Daily Grind
  • National Media Services
  • Ramsey Hardware
  • Royal Auto Works
  • Royal Comfort Shoe Center
  • Truss’D
  • United Bank
  • White Pickett Fence

Down Home Comfort Bakery Owners, Maureen & Keith Menefee

Maureen Menefee decided to open her business, Down Home Comfort Bakery, along with her husband Keith, because she loved baking and creating her own recipes. When Mrs. Menefee was in school, her teacher had given her a book that offered hints about creating a business, and she claims to have always had an interest in creating her own business.

Down Home Comfort Bakery is located at 120-A East Main Street, in Front Royal, Virginia. The Menefees’ goal is to keep building their business, but they want to stay local and focus on customer service while reaching more people. They offer homemade goods and are most known for their pies and cinnamon buns, known as “Sticky buns.” While participating in a job shadowing activity at the bakery, I was impressed to see how much love and care the Menefees worked into their goods. You could just tell they had a passion for what they were doing.

Their bakery continues to do things in the community; not just to grow more as a local business, but to reach out and support other businesses on Main Street. Some of the events they attend include: the Festival of Leaves, charities, donations, and baked goods sold in local businesses. There was only one question that took a minute for Mrs. Menefee to answer, and that was, “If you had one piece of advice to someone just starting out, what would it be?” Mrs. Menefee responded, “make sure it’s really what you aspire to do and stay true to yourself.”

My overall experience was very inspiring because I am currently enrolled in an entrepreneurship course. I plan to create my own business when the opportunity rolls around later in life, so job shadowing at Down Home Comfort Bakery gave me a strong idea of where and how to start.

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Lt. Robbie Seal weighs in on proposed FRPD Community Resource Officer budget cut

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Lt. Robbie Seal describes his duties as the CRO with Roger Bianchini in the Royal Examiner studio. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

Having noticed a part-time salary cut in the proposed the Fiscal Year 2021 Front Royal Police Department budget, Royal Examiner inquired as to what position was being proposed for elimination.

FRPD Chief Kahle Magalis confirmed that the position noted as Line Item 41003 on page 35 of the proposed FY 2021 Town Budget, page two of the “Department of Public Safety” section was FRPD’s Community Resource Officer (CRO). It is a position recently vacated when Robbie Seal transferred to the Warren County Sheriff’s Office to take on the same duties for newly-elected Sheriff Mark Butler on January 1.

While acknowledging the proposed cut was not suggested departmentally, Chief Magalis declined to get into a discussion of the department’s proposed budget this early in the FY 2021 budget cycle.

So, we reached out to now WCSO Lt. Robbie Seal for a description of his duties as the CRO, first for five years with FRPD and now in his second month at the sheriff’s office. Seal consented to a video interview to describe his past and present work as a liaison officer between law enforcement and the communities in which they operate.

He explained his decision to leave FRPD as simply accepting a challenge presented to him by Sheriff Butler to bring the Community Resource Officer function to a physically more far-ranging community.

In this Royal Examiner video interview, hear Seal’s enthusiasm for his Community Resource Officer’s jobs, both past, and present, as well as his belief that eliminating the position from the town police department that brought it to this community five years ago is a bad idea:

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US Navy Band – Country Current performs at Randolph-Macon Academy

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On Friday, February 21, 2020, the US Navy Band Country Current performed a concert in Boggs Chapel at Randolph-Macon Academy. The United States Navy Band Country Current is the Navy’s premier country-bluegrass ensemble.

If you missed the concert, watch on this exclusive Royal Examiner video:

United States Navy Country Current plays concert February 21, 2020

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VDOT: Warren County Traffic alert for February 24 – 28, 2020

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The following is a list of highway work that may affect traffic in Warren County during the coming weeks. Scheduled work is subject to change due to inclement weather and material supplies. Motorists are advised to watch for slow-moving tractors during mowing operations. When traveling through a work zone, be alert to periodic changes in traffic patterns and lane closures.

*NEW* or *UPDATE* indicates a new entry or a revised entry since last week’s report.

INTERSTATE 66

*NEW* Mile marker 16 to 13, westbound – Right shoulder closures for sign installations, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. through March 13.

INTERSTATE 81
No lane closures reported.

PRIMARY ROADS
No lane closures reported.

SECONDARY ROADS
Route 613 (Bentonville Road) – Northbound right shoulder closures for utility work at various locations between Route 340 (Stonewall Jackson Highway) and Route 730 (Shangri-La Road), 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. through February 27.

Various roads – Flagger traffic control for utility tree trimming. Monday through Friday during daylight hours.

Vegetation management may take place district wide on various routes. Motorists are reminded to use extreme caution when traveling through work zones.

Traffic alerts and traveler information can be obtained by dialing 511. Traffic alerts and traveler information also are available at http://www.511Virginia.org.

The VDOT Customer Service Center can assist with reporting road hazards, asking transportation questions, or getting information related to Virginia’s roads. Call 800-FOR- ROAD (800-367-7623) or use its mobile-friendly website at https://my.vdot.virginia.gov/. Agents are available 24 hours-a-day, seven days a week.

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Town Talk: A conversation with Gary Kushner

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Town Talk is a series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea, topic or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to news@RoyalExaminer.com

In this Town Talk, we’ll have a conversation with Gary Kushner. Gary has been outspoken at the Board of Supervisor meetings, as well as, Town Council meetings. Gary comes prepared with researched data and presents reasonable solutions to issues facing local government. With time restraints imposed by our governing bodies, the Royal Examiner offered some additional time to Gary to present some solutions to be considered, or at least serious thought to be given.


Here is a planned presentation Gary planned to give to the Town Council on February 19, 2020. As Gary mentions in the video, he had requested time to present, but 4 out of 6 councilmembers declined to hear his remarks.

Planned Presentation at the February 19, Special Council Meeting:

Few were satisfied with the February 10 Council session where frustration and emotions were on display by many in attendance. I believe some of the rudeness and criticisms leveled in the public presentations prevented a cohesive communication from being received by Council.

I’m attempting to provide a more organized and effective communication to the Council on some relevant issues and offer suggestions that may help in the development of the 20/21 budget. Also, I heard Council comments that they’ve listened to the silent majority in contrast to most of the Feb 10 in-person citizen opinions. However, I believe there’s the silent majority that supports much of the in-person testimony the Council heard as well.

Also, I’m known as a straight shooter and generally not inclined to sugar coat things. So, to ensure there’s no misunderstanding with my perspective, I try to be very direct. However, I intend that these comments will be taken constructively.

Regardless of the criticism heard at Council meetings, I think the majority of the public is appreciative of their efforts and that members sincerely try to represent the interests of the citizens.

I believe there is much common ground between the citizens and the Council.

– I think there’s consensus that having a fiscally conservative Govt is the right direction.

– Having Operational expenses grow 35% over the past ten years when the population has only grown 4% indicates things have gotten a bit off-course, and Right-Sizing efforts are needed.

– There’s a limited appetite for increases in taxes and fees.

– Virtually everyone agrees that Maintenance of Infrastructure is essential, and ‘kicking the can down the road’ isn’t a responsible position.

– Maintenance needs to involve quality and permanent solutions, not temporary ones. Most agree that applying a slurry solution to roads instead of using asphalt is penny wise and pound foolish, and curbs and gutters are valuable.

– Aggressively addressing the waste/water Inflow and Infiltration (I&I) is preferable to having undesirable consequences imposed by outside authorities.

– That is, having citizens involved with their government is a necessary thing. Citizens want to be represented, not ruled. The government is a shared responsibility. Getting feedback from citizens should create better solutions and distribute accountability between the Council and the public. A collaborative approach ensures that all sides of an issue are analyzed and avoids having a limited perspective.

So lets’ address some specific issues;

You heard significant opposition to the proposed reorganization that would have Community development and Tourism outsourced.

Some of the key arguments presented included:

– AppalachianTrail Committee Co-chairman Susan Tschirhart highlighted that Front Royal had achieved an ‘Appalachian Trail Community’ designation that was special and created a better promotion for our community.

– She noted steady tourism revenue growth in the last 5 years.

– There were 5 new recreational based businesses, 3 being on the main street.

– The Front Royal Visitor Ctr was rated Second only to Skyline Caverns as a top attraction site.

– Virginia Tourism Corp reported that in 2018 Warren County received $151 mil from tourism and there were 1,700 jobs with a $23 mil payroll

– She confirmed that Town staff were motivated and had been effective in their efforts to promote tourism.

– and The Joint Town/County Tourism Advisory Board was an effective organization.

The bottom line here is that evidence exists that the previous organization and staff were achieving good results. So, what was the justification in not observing the principle of ‘if it’s not broke, don’t fix it’?

Explicit statements were made by the Interim Manager that there were no negative performance issues related to the fired employees, and the proposed reorganization was solely to expand Tourism results. Considering that the firings occurred so quickly and that positions were funded through the end of the year, there is reasonable public concern that other factors were at play here that was not honestly reported. That being said, public trust is a very important element, so all efforts are warranted to maintain that trust.

There was opposition not only to the proposed re-organization but to its implementation as well.

– The ‘midnight massacre firings’ was anything but compassionate and not well thought out.

– No consultation occurred with the Joint Tourism Advisory committee

– No plan was immediately available to address the responsibilities of staff that was fired just before the beginning of the Spring/Summer tourism season.

– And regardless of the HR legal opinion that the firings met muster, some believe the Town may have subjected themselves to legal jeopardy because of other personnel issues.

There were also several negative factors relevant to outsourcing being proposed as the solution.

– The Town had previous experience with outsourcing that did not produce good results.

– Other Valley jurisdictions had bad outsourcing experiences as well.

– The employees of a contracting business would not have a personal investment as do staff who live in our area.

– Having Town staff conducting tourism promotion provides a continuity year to year that would not be guaranteed with contractor employees. Such personal relationships between local staff and business interests is an important element and should not be undervalued.

– Contracting tourism support would not be as ‘agile’ as having local staff. Contracts are for specific tasks, to get well-defined deliverables, in a specified time frame. Tourism is a dynamic area, and outsourcing would not provide the flexibility available with using in-house resources.

With all that said, subsequent comments from Council has me hopeful that they will be re-visiting the proposed outsourcing plan.

Next, let’s address the EDA:

Everyone references the organization as the EDA, but the formal name is; The Industrial Development Authority of the Town of Front Royal, Va. And the County of Warren, Virginia. Its purpose is to represent the interests of both jurisdictions.

In a Memorandum of Agreement for the New Market Tax Credit Program signed by Mayor Tharpe, Manager Waltz and the Town Attorney May 2017, Paragraph 1. says: “ It is anticipated that loan funding would be acquired by the EDA from the Program at 1.5% interest annually for the first seven (7) years of financing, at which time the Town will have to secure refinancing for the unpaid outstanding principal balance on the Town projects from another source”. With the operative word being ‘anticipated’.

Paragraph 3. states; “ The Town will fund, to the extent legally permissible, one hundred percent (100%) of the EDA’s debt service through an annual appropriation and expenditure from the Town’s adopted budget associated with the a) Police Dept HQ on Kendrick Lane: …..”. This evidences Town liability in my mind that goes beyond the moral one.

Thereafter, the Town was encouraged by Brian Phillips of PEOPLE Inc. (who managed the New Mkt Tax Credit program) to take a 2.65 % loan rate but the Town elected to ‘roll the dice’ for the 1.5% rate that they never qualified for.

A loan for 3% was eventually obtained for the Town’s Police Dept. construction. The EDA recently offered an interest rate of 2.25% but the Town continues to think they deserve the 1.5% rate and have authorized $45k for accounting services and $200K for legal services supposedly to get it!

The difference between the 1.5% interest rate the Town wants and the 2.25% rate EDA offered is only $87,240! The EDA is eating the difference between the offered rate and the actual 3% rate on the loan. What sense does it make to budget $245K to address a possible $87k loss? Let’s look further.

The Town originally filed suit against EDA for $3 million, supposedly to guard against being affected by a statute of limitations. However, no specific evidence was ever advertised to support that justification. Later, the Town increased the amount to $15 million but without any documented specification of damages. Now the suit is being amended again to who knows how much!

The EDA owned properties are now assessed at $31.5 million, but they have $40.8 million in debt. There’s no surplus to get! And if the Town thinks they’re going to get a property as a possible court-ordered payoff, that’s a pipe dream. Is it reasonable to consider that the courts would give the Town precedent over the loan holders?

Jennifer McDonald and the prior EDA Board, who were allegedly responsible for the misdeeds and losses, are GONE. The new Exec. Director and Board have been working diligently to clean up the mess and get back to producing good results for the Town and County.

It’s been alleged that the EDA was mostly focused on County projects but the truth is just the opposite. They’re working on the Happy Creek Technology Park, and they did the Leech Run Project, they’re actively marketing the Avtex property and many others. On February 19, they hosted an event with the Blueridge Assoc. of Realtors and visited 28 sites, 21 of which were in the Town.

Plus, the Town is not without fault in this whole affair, in my opinion.

– They gambled with the PD loan rate with the New Market Tax Credit program.

– They virtually abandoned involvement with the EDA Board well before the skulduggery was discovered.

– When a Council member first raised a red flag years ago, they were not only ignored but were seriously criticized.

– Now, the Town is withholding even the principal payment on the PD loan making EDA’s financial situation more precarious.

The Town’s continued adversarial behavior is damaging the organization that is presently, and has been, trying to support it! The past EDA embezzlement and misdeeds are enough of a black eye itself. Still, the contentious environment the Town is promoting is making things worse and further damaging our community’s reputation. What business wants to make a serious investment where there is so much chaos, drama, and uncertainty?

In Conclusion,

To promote improved communications between the Council and the public, to promote Economic Development activities and to address having a balanced 20/21 budget, the following suggestions are offered.

Communications:

– Increase the public presentation time at Council meetings to 4 or 5 minutes per citizen but be less lenient with speakers who cannot observe that limit. This would enable citizens to communicate w/ Council better and demonstrate an honest desire by the Council to encourage citizen participation in their government.

– Institute a provision for public interaction at the work sessions. This could be limited to just questions and be controlled either by a time boundary (30-60 min?) or limit it to a specific # of issues. Or consider having written questions submitted to the Mayor when the work session items are finished, and a short break is taken. Then have the Mayor choose which issues are most relevant to address when the work session is reconvened.

– Implement the ‘town hall’ sessions previously identified in the prior Communications proposal, with only the Mayor representing the Council positions. Try them monthly, to begin with, and then evaluate and adjust based on experience. I believe the Mayor is addressing this already.

– Support the creation of public committees on specific issues such as infrastructure, finance/budget, etc.). I believe the Mayor may be considering this already.

– When significant issues or organizational changes are being considered, produce a documented analysis, and advertise it to the public, before final decisions are made. Now, some in the public think why show up at Council meetings and provide feedback since decisions are being advertised rather than being proposed?

– Since there seems to be meaningful animosity and distrust between the Interim Mgr and the public, consider having a special town hall session where concerns can be honestly expressed, and explanations can be offered to dispel any rumors and misunderstandings.

Anyone who doesn’t see the disconnect between the public now and the Council maybe has their head in the sand. Simply continuing business, as usual, will not create different results and is the definition of ‘stupidity’.

Tourism:

– Re-establish the in-house Community Development/tourism structure that was so effective previously and abandon the outsourcing plan that’s been emphatically opposed by much of the public

– Encourage engagement with the Joint Town/County Tourism Advisory Board.

EDA:

– Direct the Town’s finance representative to meet with the EDA accountant so available records can be reviewed to arrive at an overpayment figure such that options can be developed to resolve that matter without unnecessary attorney involvement.

– Accept the EDA offered an interest rate of 2.25% on the Police Dept loan and begin making full payments. If this option is not pursued, at least begin making principal payments that the Town is moral, if not legally, obligated to which is not in question.

– Withdraw the litigation against the EDA.

– Use the remainder of the budgeted $245K planned for EDA accounting and attorney services for other 20/21 needs.

– Withdraw the Virginia legislation proposal to permit a separate Town EDA. That proposal sends the wrong message.

– Begin a fully cooperative engagement with the EDA Board.

– Engage more fully with the Town/County Liason Committee.

20/21 Budget:

– Eliminate the proposed Asst. Town Mgr position for a savings of well over $100K in salary and benefits. This proposed new position is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. Include this responsibility in the Finance Director’s position in that they are most knowledgable about all Town issues. When you’re looking to down-size government, creating new positions is counterproductive.

– Evaluate eliminating the 12 existing vacant positions referenced at the February 3rd work session that may not be critical.

– Apply the ‘last in, first out’ policy on the positions that were expanded in the preceding several years and eliminate positions and operational programs that are not critical.

– Abandon the proposal to obtain a Landscape Architect and hire a well-qualified replacement for the landscape person who recently retired. In-house staff will be more nimble and should cost less than outsourcing. Plus, you get what you pay for.

– Consider adjusting the employee benefits package to get a rate that does not exceed the budgeted 3% increase from last year. My understanding is that the existing benefits package is very generous.

– Instead of providing the third full traunch of the compensation study this year, split the balance in half and extend it to 4 yrs rather than finish it in 3 years. This would have a minimal effect in that a COLA is also shown in the budget.

– Direct the Interim Manager to document any possible government improvements that may be identified henceforth but leave them for the permanent Town Manager to consider for possible implementation.

That concludes the presentation I would have made to the Council had I been permitted to address them at the Feb 19 work session.

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Dreams of wings: I’ve always wanted to fly

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Connor Gamma, age 17, is a very special young man. Connor, a senior at Randolph-Macon Academy in Front Royal has accomplished something very few even try to do. He has earned a private pilot certificate and has logged 100 hours of flight during his time at R-MA. Geoff Peterson, a flight instructor at the school describes this feat as an incredible and unique experience for anyone and even more so for a 17-year-old.

Randolph-Macon Academy offers first-class instruction both in the air and on the ground to students who will discover the unlimited opportunities aviation presents. As students rise to reach their goals in the flight program they gain self-confidence, self-esteem, and broaden their career options.

Connor and Geoff describe the journey with our publisher Mike McCool in this exclusive Royal Examiner video.

After the studio session with Geoff and Connor, while looking for some background information about the R-MA flight program and Connor Gamma, several articles appeared that really highlighted the character of this young man.  Not to digress from the topic, and not to embarrass but sharing this article about Connor is an example of the character of this young man.

More about the flight program at Randolph-Macon Academy

R-MA has the only flight training program at the private high school level that offers in-house flight training. The instructors are R-MA employees, and the aircraft used are academy-owned. R-MA student pilots do the majority of their flight training throughout the beautiful Shenandoah Valley. R-MA’s flight training program is based out of the Front Royal/Warren County Airport near the north entrance of Shenandoah National Park. Students frequently fly to Luray Airport, New Market Airport, Winchester Airport, Martinsburg Airport, Hagerstown Airport, and Shenandoah Valley Airport.

To begin flight training, a US Passport or a US birth certificate along with a US government-issued photo ID is needed. Non-United States citizens need to contact the director of flight training for information about the international flight training application. The flight student’s parent or guardian must sign our indemnity agreement.

It is the goal of nearly every R-MA flight student to at least earn his or her solo wings. It is an exhilarating experience for any high school student to reach the goal of flying an aircraft without the presence of a flight instructor. Upon reaching solo status, each student is presented with his or her solo wings during a special ceremony.

The students must meet the following requirements to solo:

At least 16 years old
Fluent in written and spoken English
Able to obtain at least an FAA 3rd class medical
Pass a pre-solo written examination
Private Pilot Certificate

To earn a private pilot certificate, a flight student must pass a written, oral and practical exam. The oral and practical exam is given by an FAA-designated examiner. Candidates must also meet the following requirements:

At least 17 years old
Fluent in written and spoken English
Hold at least an FAA 3rd class medical
A minimum of 40 flight hours logged
It must be noted that progress will vary from student to student and additional costs may be incurred in order for each high school student to reach his or her goals. Safety is the primary concern at R-MA, and neither the solo flight nor the private pilot certification is guaranteed, regardless of flight time or costs incurred.

The flight training program at R-MA is for those who want to experience the magic of aviation and find new and interesting ways to challenge themselves.

Here’s a short video clip of Connor in flight training:

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American Cancer Society announces new hotel partners in Winchester, providing complimentary rooms to cancer patients

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If you’re a cancer patient, your treatment options may require you to travel a long distance from home. Since many cancer treatments require multiple outpatient visits, travel can be exhausting and arranging overnight lodging can be expensive. That’s why the American Cancer Society created the Hotel Partners Program, working with hotels across the country to provide complimentary rooms to cancer patients who need to travel for treatment.

The Society is pleased to announce three new hotels have joined the Hotel Partners Program:

  • The George Washington A Wyndham Grand Hotel (103 E Piccadilly St, Winchester, VA 22601)
  • La Quinta Inn & Suites by Wyndham (1055 Millwood Pike, Winchester, VA 22602)
  • Candlewood Suites (1135 Millwood Pike, and, US-50, Winchester, VA 22602)

They join Country Inn and Suites, by Carlson which has been part of the Hotel Partners Program for the past two years. These hotels offer accommodations for cancer patients who travel long distance from their homes in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland, to be treated at Valley Health Cancer Center at Winchester Medical Center. Patients come from as far away as West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

The American Cancer Society is very grateful to our new and existing hotel partners in Winchester who are making a tangible impact on the community. Going through cancer is hard enough, but when patients need to travel far for treatment, there are huge roadblocks that can make it even more difficult to get treatment. That’s where our Hotel Partners program steps in – our goal is to provide lodging for patients who need to travel long distance so they can focus on getting the life-saving treatments they need and to help alleviate their financial stress,” says Anna Somers, American Cancer Society mission delivery manager. “The Hotel Partners program is a great opportunity for local hotels to give back to the community by helping cancer patients traveling for treatment.”

In 2018, the American Cancer Society provided more than 35,000 individual cancer patients and their caregivers with more than 543,000 complimentary nights of free lodging either through its 32 ACS Hope Lodges nationwide or through the Hotel Partners Program, saving cancer patients an estimated $59 million in hotel costs. Nationwide, more than 8,500 patients were served through the Hotel Partners Program with more than 66,000 provided through participating hotels which saved patients more than $9.6 million.

To be eligible to receive lodging through the Hotel Partners Program, patients must travel long distance for a cancer-related medical appointment that requires lodging near their treatment center, have a permanent residence, and either be able to care for their personal needs while at the hotel or travel with a companion who can assist them.

The American Cancer Society is seeking additional hotel partners for the program. If you are interested in partnering to provide complimentary rooms for cancer patients in the Winchester area, please contact anna.somers@cancer.org.

For information about American Cancer Society programs and services, including lodging, please visit cancer.org or call 1-800-227-2345.

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
30°
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Feels like: 30°F
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Pressure: 30.3"Hg
UV index: 0
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Upcoming Events

Feb
23
Sun
1:00 pm Free Women’s Self Defense Class @ Linden Volunteer Fire Department
Free Women’s Self Defense Class @ Linden Volunteer Fire Department
Feb 23 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Free Women's Self Defense Class @ Linden Volunteer Fire Department
Instructed by Sgt Winner of the Front Royal Police Department, in collaboration with the Warren Co Victim Witness Program, hosted by Linden Volunteer Fire Department. Space limited to 20 participants. Reserve your spot by visiting[...]
5:00 pm Sunday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Fire Department
Sunday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Fire Department
Feb 23 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Sunday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Fire Department
Divinum Auxilium Academy’s Bingo Night! Games, Fun, and Prizes! 6 cards per round of Bingo/15 rounds. Purchase tickets at www.divineassistanceacademy.org or contact Kristin at DAAfundraising@gmail.com Food & drinks, including beer & wine, available for purchase beginning[...]
Feb
25
Tue
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 25 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, February 25 – Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! After[...]
Feb
26
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 26 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, February 19 and Thursday, February 20: Come in for some great stories, songs, and a craft about our feathered friends, Birds!  Siblings welcome. Wednesday, February[...]
Feb
27
Thu
10:00 am Day of Giving @ Samuels Public Library
Day of Giving @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 27 @ 10:00 am – 8:00 pm
Day of Giving @ Samuels Public Library
In conjunction with “Love Your Library Month,” Samuels Public Library will hold its first “Day of Giving” on Thursday, February 27, 2020. Thanks to an anonymous donor, all donations made in-person at the Library or[...]
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 27 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, February 19 and Thursday, February 20: Come in for some great stories, songs, and a craft about our feathered friends, Birds!  Siblings welcome. Wednesday, February[...]
Feb
28
Fri
7:00 pm Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Feb 28 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Love Revival - FREE Monthly Community Dinner @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Free Community Dinner for everyone! Come enjoy a hot meal on the last Friday of every month at Love Revival Ministry Center.
Feb
29
Sat
10:00 am Loom Knit a Kitten @ Strokes of Creativity
Loom Knit a Kitten @ Strokes of Creativity
Feb 29 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Loom Knit a Kitten @ Strokes of Creativity
Loom Knit an adorable kitten. In this beginner’s class for teens and adults, you will work on a 24 peg loom to knit a small stuffed toy. *Instruction will be right handed. No prior knitting[...]
11:00 am Kooky Chefs Cook It Up: Soups @ Samuels Public Library
Kooky Chefs Cook It Up: Soups @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 29 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Kooky Chefs Cook It Up: Soups @ Samuels Public Library
Nothing is more comforting than warm soup on a chilly day! Learn how to make some yummy soup, and do some taste-testing to choose your favorite. For ages 8 and up. Registration begins January 29.
11:00 am Trauma & Resiliency Training for... @ Samuels Public Library
Trauma & Resiliency Training for... @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 29 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Trauma & Resiliency Training for Early Childhood Providers @ Samuels Public Library
Statistics show us that one in four children will experience trauma by the age of four. This trauma could be abuse, hunger, homelessness, witnessing violence, medical trauma, or grief. We know that a child’s greatest[...]