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‘War Dogs Garden of Remembrance’ opens at Front Royal’s Julia Wagner Animal Shelter

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In an April 14 press release from the Humane Society of Warren County, the Memorial Day weekend dedication of a “War Dogs Garden of Remembrance” at the society’s county animal shelter on Progress Drive off Shenandoah Shores Road was announced. The ceremony will compliment, but be separate from other Memorial Day events. As noted below, the dedication of the War Dogs Garden of Remembrance will take place on the Wagner Shelter grounds at noon, Saturday, May 28. Local law enforcement K-9 handlers, those with family connections to war dog service, along with all the county’s dog and animal lovers, are invited to attend.

As noted in the release, local canine lover, advocate, former HSWC Board of Directors President, and Royal Examiner contributing writer Malcolm Barr Sr. was instrumental in establishing the war dog memorial on the shelter grounds. Read the full HSWC release on the “War Dogs Garden of Remembrance” and its dedication below:

After some 10 years saluting the memory of military dogs lost in action in the wars since
World War II, this year the dogs will be recognized in a separate ceremony in a newly-sculptured garden at the Julia Wagner Animal Shelter in Front Royal.

As in the past, the Front Royal ceremony will be held on Memorial Day weekend but separate from the annual Monday (May 30) salute to the dead of all wars: Saturday, May 28 at noon is the date set to honor the dogs of war at their own site at the shelter.


Said Malcolm Barr Sr., a past president of the Humane Society of Warren County (HSWC): “We felt it appropriate for the dogs to have their own memorial particularly since Front Royal was the first town in the country to train dogs for World War II before the U.S. Army took over the responsibility.”

‘War Dogs Garden of Remembrance’ patron Malcolm Barr Sr., with his Husky Diva, who appears to be modeling for the war dog memorial statue yet to arrive during this early visit to the Wagner Shelter garden site. Royal Examiner/HSWC Photo by Roger Bianchini

Barr provided the funding for the modest garden which was carved from the shelter grounds last fall to await a life-size German Shepherd statue. The statue marks the spot that ultimately will also be a quiet area for contemplation and rest for dog-loving individuals and others who visit the shelter.

Michael Williams, whose father was a dog handler in the Vietnam War, will conduct the Saturday ceremony and offer the blessing of the dogs of war, past and present, including the more recent introduction of dogs to assist in law enforcement on the home front, including those in Warren County.

HSWC Executive Director Meghan Bowers explains: “I just love to have such an important memorial to the bravery, companionship and accomplishment of dogs here at the shelter. There is nothing as special as the dedication and love of a dog or cat, and we are so proud have such a beautiful reminder to see every day.”

Veterans have returned from war zones with high praise for the dogs used in increasing numbers on the battlefield and by local law enforcement. Most dogs, once regarded as mere “equipment”, in recent years have been treated as soldiers, with rank usually above their handlers. They retire from battle usually with their handler and funds to help with their veterinary care.

While many dogs, specifically Belgian Malinois or Dutch or German Shepherds, come in from abroad, the U.S. Air Force now trains thousands of potential inductees at its Texas base near San Antonio. Back in May 2010, a small group of military and civilian advocates began raising money and lobbying for the nation’s first dog memorial which in 2012 was placed in the Airborne and Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville, NC, near Fort Bragg.

Among individual canine soldiers, which train between 6 and 12 months before going into the field, early recognition was afforded a dog named Remco who charged an insurgent’s hideout in Afghanistan, thus saving many soldiers’ lives. Two years later, in 2011, a Belgian Malinois named Cairo participated in the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden. During Vietnam, our war dogs were so successful in their jobs that, according to author Betty Frankel, bounties of up to $20,000 were placed on them by the North Vietnamese.

Persons interested, particularly those whose family members may have served with dogs during World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq wars, or local police officers whose duties involve dogs and wish to take part in the ceremony, please contact the shelter (540-635-4734) or call Malcolm Barr (540-636-7407).

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WC DECA celebrates three of its Alumni during DECA Month

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Each year, during November which is National DECA Month, the Warren County DECA shares the success stories of three of their alumni. We are pleased to introduce to you three of our recent alumni and how DECA helped prepare for their post-secondary experiences.

Makayla Grant (2021).  As a WCHS DECA member, Makayla competed at the district and state levels.  She was the chapter’s Vice-President of Recruitment and Engagement.  Makayla is also the initial recipient of the Dr. Leonard F. Maiden DECA Scholarship which is given annually to a graduating WCHS DECA senior.  Makayla is currently a second-year student at Virginia Commonwealth University.  She had this to say about her DECA experiences.

“DECA has prepared me for college primarily because I was given ample opportunities to practice professionalism, presentation skills, and interviewing skills. I was a member for three years and the VP of recruitment and engagement for one year. Today I’m a Sophomore Business Foundation’s student at Virginia Commonwealth University with projections to concentrate in Product and Brand Marketing. My time in DECA helped give me the confidence and preparation to currently become a Teaching Assistant, a member of Business Student Ambassadors (at VCU), and secure two part time jobs in the Richmond area.” 

Michael Kelly (2021).  As a WCHS DECA member, Michael competed at the district, state, and national levels.  Michael’s greatest contribution to the chapter was serving as Co-Manager of DECA Tailgaters, one of the chapter’s School-Based Enterprise (SBE) which received a Gold standard certification from National DECA.  Michael is currently a second –year student at James Madison University.  He had this to say about his DECA experiences.


“DECA has helped me tremendously and the numerous skills I learned from Mr. Gardner and my advisors have really translated to life after graduation. Through DECA I have gained an immense amount of confidence that I use toward anytime I have to publicly speak, present a project, or interview for a job/internship. Not only did DECA teach me how to present myself, but it improved my critical thinking ability as well as my ability to lead. Every employer wants a leader that’s not just reactive, but proactive as well, and by the time any DECA member walks across the graduation stage they have become the embodiment of the chapter’s motto “Improvise. Adapt. Overcome.” I will continue to use the skills I learned in DECA to reach my goal of getting my Juris Doctorate and eventually working for the CIA, FBI, or DOD.”

Emily Mawson (2022).  Serving as her chapter’s president during her senior year, Emily also competed at the district, state, and national levels.  She was a state winner during both her junior and senior years.  Emily is also a recipient of the Dr. Leonard F. Maiden DECA Scholarship Currently, Emily is a freshman at West Virginia University.  She had this to say about her DECA experiences.

“Last year, I had the pleasure of serving as Warren County DECA’s chapter president. During my term, I produced one of the most successful seasons our chapter has ever seen. We broke records at the district, state, and national level. I’m incredibly proud of the work we produced as a chapter. I spent two years in DECA, and as a freshman at West Virginia University, I am a proud alumni of the organization. I’m currently studying psychology and criminology at West Virginia University, with a focus in behavioral analysis. My chapter and advisor encouraged me to chase my dreams and even provided a $1000.00 scholarship to jumpstart my education.

Without DECA, I would not be the person I am today. DECA encourages leadership, organization, team work, and professionalism. These are all qualities that employers and higher education institutions look for in students and employees. Many of the core aspects of DECA are transferable to different areas of life. I’ve used the education provided by DECA in my educational and professional life. DECA allowed me to grow as a leader, encouraging me to be an active listener and use my creative background to improve every project I worked on. 

Many of the essays on college applications I filled out asked how I responded under pressure. A fair majority of the prompts asked me to describe a hardship or how I overcame a difficult decision. Application committees aren’t necessarily asking about your past, but how you respond under pressure. DECA provides instruction and opportunities to teach young adults about maintaining professionalism and overcoming adversity. That alone has helped me more than anything else.

During my first semester at West Virginia University, I was able to secure a job at Milan Puskar Stadium. During football season, I was hired to work in premium seating as part of hospitality management. The education provided by DECA allowed me to be well informed of the industry I was working in. During my senior year, I worked on a project based in project management, hospitality, and entrepreneurship. My time in DECA has served me well professionally.

DECA has allowed me to accomplish many things. I’ve secured jobs, received scholarships, and performed at a higher rate in projects because of this incredible organization. This important educational opportunity has transformed me as a person, and I cannot repay my chapter, or my advisor, Mr. Richard Gardner.”

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Warren County owed over $1.5 million in delinquent personal property and real estate taxes

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“Nothing is certain but death and taxes.” That oft-used phrase was penned by Benjamin Franklin in 1789, and it holds true today.

Taxes are something almost every citizen deals with. Taxes fund our government and the services it provides. In the Commonwealth of Virginia, residents pay federal income taxes, real estate taxes, and personal property taxes, among others.

Warren County is tasked with collecting both real estate and personal property taxes biannually. Most citizens get their payments in on time, though not everyone complies. Warren County Treasurer Jamie Spiker said in a recent interview that the COVID pandemic proved hard on many, and because of that, the County opted to suspend its practice of placing holds on Virginia DMV vehicle registration renewals of drivers who were delinquent on tax payments. Municipalities also stopped other collection efforts, such as placing liens on taxpayer bank accounts and on employers’ paychecks to tax-delinquent employees.

Spiker said DMV holds will begin again in the Spring of 2023, noting that bank and employer liens were reinstated earlier this year. “Some accounts are hard to collect on if they are not employed in Virginia; they registered their vehicles in another state or in another name,” Spiker continued.


Regarding the delinquent personal property tax list, Spiker said, “Without giving actual information on specific accounts, some of the delinquents listed [on the delinquent personal property list] are either making payments, have Warrant in Debts, and/or DMV holds.“ She said some of those on the list have actually paid their back taxes since the list was produced on Oct. 3. Because of the additional monthly interest added to past-due accounts, Spiker said some balances on delinquent accounts that are making payments do not reflect much change.

As of Oct. 3, Warren County was owed over $266,000 in back personal property taxes, according to the Warren County Delinquent Personal Property database. The County has over $1.3 million in Real Estate taxes that remained uncollected as of that date. Warren County maintains a database that lists the unpaid amount for each real estate parcel by owner name and another list for delinquent personal property tax, also displayed by name.

As for real estate taxes, those accounts that are past due since 2019 were turned over to collection firms in 2022. The local firm Pond Law Group collects on past-due accounts whose last names begin with A-L. Richmond-based Taxing Authority Consulting Services (TACS) collects delinquent accounts whose last names begin with M-Z.

Ms. Spiker explained that once the collection firm gets a past-due file, real estate owners are contacted and asked for payment. Taxpayers have the option of paying fully at once or arranging a payment plan. If neither of those options is worked out, the firms begin the process that leads to a sale of the property to pay back taxes.

Tax auctions were not held in 2020 due to COVID, Spiker said, though they were restarted in 2021. There was one auction in 2021 and one in 2022. Moving forward, Warren County will have at least four delinquent property auctions annually, with each firm committed to having two per year.

Despite over a million dollars in real estate revenue remaining uncollected, Spiker says she would love to have a collections person in the Treasurer’s office, something that has been requested for almost every budget year, though such a collections position has never been approved.

Spiker said of having an in-house collector, “I feel like the position would pay for itself.” The salary for such a position could range from $35,000-$60,000, depending on qualifications. She says if the position is not approved in the next budget year, she would pursue other options, such as hiring a part-time employee or switch to an agency that handles personal property as well as real estate collections.

With delinquent taxes for real estate alone north of $1.3 million, can the Warren County Board of Supervisors afford not to add a collections position?

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Blue Ridge Wildlife Center Patient of the Week: Pileated Woodpecker

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This female Pileated woodpecker came into care this week after a suspected vehicle collision.

She was having difficulty breathing due to bleeding in the lungs and she was suffering from head trauma. After 24 hours on oxygen support, this bird improved in demeanor and breathing.

Pileated woodpeckers are the largest woodpecker species in North America, with females reaching over 14oz in weight, 19 inches long, with a wingspan of 30 inches!

The majority of their diet is made up of insects, typically found in dead trees. Pileated woodpeckers leave rectangular holes in the trees that other birds later use as nests.


Woodpeckers have special and fascinating anatomy—they have extremely strong, chisel-like beaks designed for high-impact drilling.

Also, their tongues are incredibly long (almost a third of their body length) with barbed edges to help the reach deep into drilled holes to pull out tasty insects!

Check out this video, which shows the patient boring holes into a dead log in search of wood-boring insects, like grubs and ants.

This illustration by Denise Takahashi depicts a great example of a woodpecker’s hyoid apparatus, the cartilage and bone that support the tongue. In woodpeckers, the hyoid curves all the way around the back of the skull so they have plenty of room to store their long tongues!

We are happy to report that after a week in pre-release caging, this patient fully recovered and was released!


Looking for an easy way to help native wildlife? Become a monthly BRWC donor! For as little as $5/month, you can provide year-round, sustainable support that helps us fulfill our mission.

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Buckle up and travel safely this Thanksgiving

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For many Virginians, gathering with family and friends is the true meaning of Thanksgiving. Some will even travel long distances to share in these wonderful family moments. Just as important as it is to make sure those pies and casseroles make it to the dinner table safely, motorists also need to make their own safety a priority. Virginia State Police is reminding all drivers and passengers of all ages to buckle up this holiday weekend. Preliminary data show that 54% of those who have died in traffic crashes this year were not wearing a seatbelt or safety restraint.*

“The fact that more than half of those who have lost their lives in traffic crashes this year were not wearing a seatbelt is a tragic and inexcusable reality for Virginia,” said Colonel Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “Your family wants you to arrive safely, and clicking a seatbelt can help that happen. Virginia State Police and your loved ones want you to arrive at your destination safely – ditch distractions, comply with posted speed limits, never drive buzzed or drunk, and, again, always buckle up.”

To further prevent traffic deaths and injuries during the Thanksgiving holiday, the Virginia State Police will once again be participating in Operation C.A.R.E. – Crash Awareness and Reduction Effort. As part of the state-sponsored national program, state police will be increasing its visibility and traffic enforcement efforts during the five-day statistical counting period that begins at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022, and concludes at midnight Sunday, Nov. 27, 2022.

The 2021 Thanksgiving Operation C.A.R.E. initiative resulted in troopers citing 5,127 speeders and 1,565 reckless drivers statewide. Virginia troopers charged 65 drivers for driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and/or drugs and cited 477 drivers for failing to buckle up themselves and/or juvenile passengers.


There were five traffic fatalities during the 2021 five-day Thanksgiving statistical counting period and 12 traffic fatalities during the same period in 2020.

This year, the Thanksgiving Holiday C.A.R.E. initiative falls within the annual “Click It or Ticket” campaign. This enforcement and the educational initiative aim to further emphasize the lifesaving value of seat belts for every person in a vehicle.

With increased patrols, Virginia State Police also reminds drivers of Virginia’s “Move Over” law, which requires motorists to move over when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped alongside the road. If unable to move over, drivers are required to pass the emergency vehicle cautiously. The law also applies to workers in vehicles equipped with amber lights.

*Source: Virginia Highway Safety Office, Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles. The percentage of crashes in vehicles equipped with safety restraints.

 

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WCPS begins addressing instructional materials with sexually explicit content

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Warren County Public Schools Assistant Superintendents Heather Bragg (left) and George “Buck” Smith (right) are forming a committee to develop a procedure the school division is required to use to notify parents about instructional materials that have sexually explicit content. Video and photos by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

 

Local school boards across the state have until January 1, 2023, to adopt either model policies from the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) that ensure parents are notified about instructional materials with sexually explicit content or their own policies, which “may be more comprehensive.”

Warren County Public Schools (WCPS) is working on its policy and procedure for notifying parents when instructional materials being used in the classroom have sexually explicit content and will specifically update Policy IIA-R of the Instruction section of the WCPS Policy Manual.

During the Warren County School Board’s Wednesday, November 16 work session, WCPS staff discussed Policy IIA-R and adding language to it that’s consistent with the VDOE’s “Model Policies Concerning Instructional Materials with Sexually Explicit Content.”


VDOE’s 10-page document details the policies the department developed as required by Senate Bill 656, which was enacted by the 2022 Virginia General Assembly, and became effective on August 4.

VDOE’s model policies say that parents will be notified at least 30 days in advance if any instructional materials with sexually explicit content will be used in their child’s classroom. Parents at that time can review the materials. The state policy says that school principals must maintain current lists by grade and subject of sexually explicit instructional materials on school websites.

Additionally, VDOE’s model policies note that provisions in the new state law “shall not be construed as requiring or providing for the censoring of books in public elementary and secondary schools, or the designation of instructional material as sexually explicit based solely upon the sexual orientation of the characters contained therein.”

School boards also should adopt policies “which empower parents to exercise their right to decide whether the use of sexually explicit content in instructional materials is appropriate for their child,” according to VDOE’s model policies.

The draft WCPS policy, which the school division’s attorney helped craft, closely follows VDOE’s model policies. For example, WCPS plans to use the same definitions for sexually explicit content, parent(s), and instructional material(s).

WCPS policy also coincides with VDOE model policies that say that at least 30 days prior to the use of any instructional materials with sexually explicit content, principals shall provide written notice to parents that “specifically identifies the instructional materials with sexually explicit content; informs parents of their right to review such instructional materials; and informs parents of their right to have their child use, in a non-punitive manner, alternative, instructional materials that do not include sexually explicit content.”

WCPS policy also says that principals shall provide online access for parental review of instructional materials that include sexually explicit content “unless not technically feasible or prohibited by copyright protection. Schools shall also have available at the school for parent review all instructional materials that include sexually explicit content.”

WCPS Superintendent Christopher Ballenger and WCPS Assistant Superintendents Heather Bragg and George “Buck” Smith asked for input from School Board members on the proposed WCPS policy and procedure.

“Let’s just make this as easy for parents as humanely possible,” said School Board member Melanie Salins about copyrighted materials that parents may want to review.

Ballenger said he’ll check with the school district’s attorney about what is allowable under copyright law regarding access to instructional materials with sexually explicit content, and what potential liability might exist for WCPS.

Ballenger also told board members that he has asked Bragg and Smith to put a committee together that will consist of an administrator, counselor, librarian, and teacher from each elementary, middle, and high school level. The committee members will discuss the process WCPS needs to have in place regarding notifying parents about any instructional material with sexually explicit content, he said.

Ballenger also said that WCPS staff might unintentionally “miss some things” when it posts online the list of instructional materials with sexually explicit content. To help minimize any oversights, the school district’s policy and procedure will include how a parent — who comes across such material that isn’t already listed on the WCPS website — might then bring it to the attention of WCPS staff for evaluation and action.

School Board Chair Kristen Pence (above) asked if the WCPS procedure would differ from a challenge that a parent might make to a book that he or she objects to and wants to be removed from a school. And she asked if the new procedure would just address how a parent would alert WCPS staff to potential sexually explicit content in instructional material that might need to be listed online.

Yes, said Ballenger, this policy is different than the challenge policy, and he pointed out that just because instructional material with sexually explicit content is listed online, that “doesn’t keep us from not using it.”

Bragg explained further that if WCPS staff happened to omit from the online list an instructional material containing sexually explicit content, a parent could bring it to their attention, then WCPS would decide if the instructional material meets the definition of having sexually explicit content. If it does, then the material will be listed online.

However, that material’s use would still be allowed in the classroom following the 30-day notice. Bragg said that if a parent doesn’t want his or her child exposed to it, “then we would have to find an alternative assignment or supplement material for that student.”

And if a parent still didn’t want the material being used at all, the parent could take it a step further and, under the WCPS challenge policy, request that the use of that instructional material be removed. “So, it’s kind of a little bit multi-stepped as to how far the parent wants to go,” Bragg said.

“I think the goal should be that the perception has to be open and to do whatever we have to do to get information to parents,” said School Board Vice Chair Ralph Rinaldi.

Ballenger said WCPS plans to “have a comprehensive list online” for parents to review. Bragg added that WCPS has no intention or reason to hide anything from parents.

Once something is identified and put on the list, “we want to be able to do whatever we can to give access,” Ballenger said. “We’ll work through whatever we need to work through.”

No action was taken on the work session item, which will be discussed again at a future School Board meeting.

To view the state’s model policies, go to: https://townhall.virginia.gov/L/GetFile.cfm?File=C:%5CTownHall%5Cdocroot%5CGuidanceDocs_Proposed%5C201%5CGDoc_DOE_6205_20220615.pdf.

To view the proposed WCPS policy, go to: https://go.boarddocs.com/vsba/warren/Board.nsf/files/CL2QNS69325E/$file/Policy%20IIA_revised_10_28_22.pdf.

In other discussions…

Regarding other work session topics, Smith provided the first reading of the proposed 2023-2024 school calendar; the second reading and discussion will be on December 7, and the recommendation for approval will be during the first January 2023 school board meeting.

Highlights of the calendar include:

  • August 9, 2023 – First Day of School;
  • September 14, 2023 – Parent-Teacher Conference;
  • November 20 – 24, 2023 – Fall Break;
  • December 22, 2023 – January 3, 2024 – Winter Break for students;
  • December 22, 2023 – January 1, 2024 – Winter Break for WCPS staff;
  • March 29 – April 5, 2024 – Spring Break; and
  • May 23, 2024 – Last Day of School.

Among other work session items, the School Board also discussed the 2023 School Board meeting dates and times and received updates on grounds maintenance, the recent Virginia School Boards Association (VSBA) Delegate Assembly meeting, and the school district’s contract for hiring substitute employees.

Watch the School Board work session in its entirety in this exclusive Royal Examiner video.

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VDOT: Warren County Traffic alert for November 21 – December 2, 2022

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The following is a list of highway work that may affect traffic in Warren County during the coming weeks. Scheduled work is subject to change due to inclement weather and material supplies. Motorists are advised to watch for slow-moving tractors during mowing operations. When traveling through a work zone, be alert to periodic changes in traffic patterns and lane closures.

*NEW* or *UPDATE* indicates a new or revised entry since last week’s report.

INTERSTATE 66
*NEW* Mile marker 1 to 3, eastbound and westbound – Single lane and shoulder closures for inspection of Route 842 and Route 637 overpass bridges, November 23, from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.

INTERSTATE 81
*NEW* Mile marker 299 to 300, northbound and southbound – Overnight left lane closures for equipment unloading and barrier installation, November 20 – December 1 nights from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m.


PRIMARY ROADS
Route 55 (Strasburg Road) – Possible shoulder closures for utility work between Route 616 (Messick Road/Richardson Road) and Stoney Point Way, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. through November 30.

SECONDARY ROADS
No lane closures were reported.

Vegetation management may take place district-wide on various routes. Motorists are reminded to use extreme caution when traveling through work zones.

Traffic alerts and traveler information can be obtained by dialing 511. Traffic alerts and traveler information also are available at www.511Virginia.org.

The VDOT Customer Service Center can assist with reporting road hazards, asking transportation questions, or getting information about Virginia’s roads. Call 800-FOR- ROAD (800-367-7623) or use its mobile-friendly website at my.vdot.virginia.gov. Agents are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Aders Insurance Agency, Inc (State Farm)

Aire Serv Heating and Air Conditioning

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Avery-Hess Realty, Marilyn King

Beaver Tree Services

Blake and Co. Hair Spa

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Card My Yard

CBM Mortgage, Michelle Napier

Christine Binnix - McEnearney Associates

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Down Home Comfort Bakery

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Explore Art & Clay

Family Preservation Services

First Baptist Church

Front Royal Women's Resource Center

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

G&M Auto Sales Inc

Garcia & Gavino Family Bakery

Gourmet Delights Gifts & Framing

Green to Ground Electrical

Groups Recover Together

House of Hope

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Key Move Properties, LLC

KW Solutions

Legal Services Plans of Northern Shenendoah

Main Street Travel

Makeover Marketing Systems

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Merchants on Main Street

Mountain Trails

Mountain View Music

National Media Services

No Doubt Accounting

Northwestern Community Services Board

Ole Timers Antiques

Penny Lane Hair Co.

Philip Vaught Real Estate Management

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Rotary Club of Warren County

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Cinemas

Royal Examiner

Royal Family Bowling Center

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Oak Computers

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Ruby Yoga

Salvation Army

Samuels Public Library

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

St. Luke Community Clinic

Strites Doughnuts

Studio Verde

The Institute for Association & Nonprofit Research

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

The Vine and Leaf

Valley Chorale

Vetbuilder.com

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren Coalition

Warren County Democratic Committee

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warren County DSS Job Development

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

WCPS Work-Based Learning

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

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Upcoming Events

Nov
29
Tue
4:00 pm Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Nov 29 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Kickoff for tree sales — Boy Scout Troop 52 is ready to help you find that perfect tree. We are located at the Royal Plaza in front of Rural King. We will be selling trees[...]
Nov
30
Wed
4:00 pm Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Nov 30 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Kickoff for tree sales — Boy Scout Troop 52 is ready to help you find that perfect tree. We are located at the Royal Plaza in front of Rural King. We will be selling trees[...]
5:00 pm Holiday Book Fair @ Laurel Ridge Community College
Holiday Book Fair @ Laurel Ridge Community College
Nov 30 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Holiday Book Fair @ Laurel Ridge Community College
Meet your Local Authors and Purchase Books for the Holidays You’re invited to our very first Holiday Book Fair! We will provide space for you to display your books and have a chance to interact with[...]
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Nov 30 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
1
Thu
4:00 pm Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Dec 1 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Kickoff for tree sales — Boy Scout Troop 52 is ready to help you find that perfect tree. We are located at the Royal Plaza in front of Rural King. We will be selling trees[...]
7:30 pm “Can’t Feel At Home” @ Court Square Theater
“Can’t Feel At Home” @ Court Square Theater
Dec 1 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
"Can't Feel At Home" @ Court Square Theater
“Can’t Feel At Home” an original play by Dr John T Glick. The story of families displaced from the Blue Ridge Mountains in the 1930’s to allow for the construction of Shenandoah National Park and[...]
Dec
2
Fri
4:00 pm Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Dec 2 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Christmas Tree Sales @ Royal Plaza Shopping Center
Kickoff for tree sales — Boy Scout Troop 52 is ready to help you find that perfect tree. We are located at the Royal Plaza in front of Rural King. We will be selling trees[...]
7:30 pm “Can’t Feel At Home” @ Court Square Theater
“Can’t Feel At Home” @ Court Square Theater
Dec 2 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
"Can't Feel At Home" @ Court Square Theater
“Can’t Feel At Home” an original play by Dr John T Glick. The story of families displaced from the Blue Ridge Mountains in the 1930’s to allow for the construction of Shenandoah National Park and[...]
Dec
3
Sat
6:00 am 66th Annual Pancake Day @ Warren County High School
66th Annual Pancake Day @ Warren County High School
Dec 3 @ 6:00 am – 1:00 pm
66th Annual Pancake Day @ Warren County High School
Veterans,  Law Enforcement, and Fire and Rescue on duty in uniform eats free!
8:00 am Christmas Bazaar @ Valley Assembly of God Church
Christmas Bazaar @ Valley Assembly of God Church
Dec 3 @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
Christmas Bazaar @ Valley Assembly of God Church
Food, Crafts, Bake Sale! Still seeking crafters and vendors: 6 foot tables $15.00, 8 foot tables $20.00.