Connect with us

Community Events

Fifth “Conversation of Hope” to be held on Tuesday, October 22

Published

on

The WHAT MATTERS community meeting space, “Open House: Meet in the Middle” (213 E. Main Street next to the Daily Grind) serves as a meeting place for community members seeking positivity in this time of controversy for our town and county. At 7pm, on the 4th Tuesday of each month, community leaders and citizens gather to engage in one hour of positive reflections and hope. During the first “Conversation of Hope” held at “Open House” in June, the Chief shared a fitting quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”

Please join us to engage in conversations on Main Street AND virtually through our Facebook Group, “A Virtual Conversation of Hope.”


Here are some of the uplifting words filled with compassion shared during our brief time together during ‘Conversations’:

……Tragedy doesn’t define our community; we have made it through other controversial times, the new police department is an example of the success of a dream 20+ years in the making, don’t feed the beast, negativity breeds negativity, buy local support local, this time shouldn’t change our opinion about what a blessing it is to live here, we must heal relationships with friends and the community because we are hurt and need to acknowledge our pain and rebuild, the term “keep it simple, stupid” can be used to find ways to work together, we must combat darkness with light and stay in the light, we need to be the people we are supposed to be no matter what, we will never stop all the negativity but love will lead us, people who have businesses and work here must be a part of the healing and rebuilding, be a part of the solution, people choose to move here for scenery, values and there are people who stay here for the same reason, this too shall pass, Front Royal is loved for the people, volunteering, service and beauty, shine a light on the great people here and count our blessings, go to prayer and good will prevail, this is a perfect storm for renewal and revival and to come together, a community that doesn’t hide from their faith survives—run to God and add prayer to meetings, lean on God, healing is best when focused on others and for others, be compassionate…….

Police Chief, Kahle Magalis, encouraged us to focus on the wellness of the community, not just the sickness, and suggested that the new hospital progress can remind us to do just that. He also said that he’s very pleased with the working relationship the FR Police Department and the WC Sheriff’s office have in trying to embrace collaboration and cooperation. It was discussed that some of our current issues are bringing things to light that need to be addressed and that dealing with those issues will have a positive impact. In addition, attendees spent much of the time reminiscing about favorite FR/WC memories from the old days of every weekend Skyline Drive traffic & picnics in the park, the Sesquicentennial pageant event in 1986, the Red Stock and Volleys that the hospital hosted, and our hope that another community-wide event could materialize (perhaps a canoe event). It was a heartwarming gathering!

Comments also included positive feedback about the school system, about the giving & caring individuals in our community, a reference to George Jefferson’s “moving on up” (and encouragement to focus on the positive and move forward without delay by sharing concern but finding solutions and moving on), the acknowledgement that we have a strong sense of community that’s full of characters and memories and that we have so much potential and good energy. It was expressed that this is a good time to be forced to confront what we love and value and to picture the past and what’s good about the area. One guest said, “let it go if you can’t do anything about it.”

“This too shall pass” is often uttered as well as the fact that our community has so much to offer as a busy, active and unique area (full of outdoor assets and beauty) where people care about each other and don’t let tragedy define us. Niki Foster of the FR/WC Chamber of Commerce encouraged everyone to share the wonderful things we see and be louder than the ugly noise. Representatives of area clergy have been in attendance and said they want to support and serve, especially in these times we are facing. Someone said we are passed the ugly and are on the verge of being beautiful again.

Please join us on the 4th Tuesday at 7pm, at 213 E. Main Street – OPEN HOUSE, to share and witness more encouraging conversations.


Next Conversation: Tuesday, 10/22/19 at 7pm

*Please note that these gatherings are ones of positivity, not negativity. Politics and current events will not be discussed—instead we will remind ourselves why we love our community and provide an opportunity to briefly join together those who care together in the spirit of hope…


About WHAT MATTERS:

WHAT MATTERS is a 501(c)(3) that focuses on local and global outreach to help spread the word, support and raise funds for causes that matter (primarily through Facebook). WHAT MATTERS has ZERO overhead as 100% of the expenses are funded by Beth Medved Waller’s real estate business thanks to her clients and supporters. Every cent raised goes to the cause she’s promoting and most are matched by Beth. If you’d like to get involved with her local or international nonprofit work, or travel to Africa with her on a future trip to work with the children of Light up Life Foundations, please visit www.whatmattersw2.com.

Share the News:

Community Events

This week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of July 3rd

Published

on

Are you looking for the full movie-going experience without having to wait in the long lines that often accompany that experience? Then look no further because Royal Cinemas movie theatre is the answer. Get the whole gang together and enjoy a movie! We are continuing to practice “6 Foot Social Distancing” with 25% capacity reserved seating in all auditoriums.

Outdoor Main Street Movie is this Friday, July 3, at 8:50pm:

  • Friday, July 3: “Ghostbusters”
  • Bring your own lawn chair and enjoy the outdoors! (Weather permitting)

Here is a list of this week’s showtimes at Royal Cinemas as of Friday, July 3:

•  Daily: 3:55 & 6:35
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 56 min

•  Daily: 4:00 & 6:40
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 48 min

•  Daily: 4:05 & 6:45
Rated PG  |  Run Time: 1 hour 47 min


COVID-19 Throwbacks Ticket Prices: All Seats $3.00


Other movies coming soon to Royal Cinemas:

  • “Goonies”
  • “Ferris Buellers Day Off”
  • “Gremlins”
  • “The Breakfast Club”
Share the News:
Continue Reading

Community Events

Reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 5th at the Courthouse

Published

on

On July 5th at 2pm, Colonel James Wood II Chapter of the Virginia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution will read the Declaration of Independence at the Warren County Courthouse. This event is open to the public.

Here is an overview of the Declaration of Independence taken from the National Park Service:

Looking back on the Declaration of Independence almost 50 years later, Thomas Jefferson explained that the document’s purpose was never meant to be thoroughly original; its purpose wasn’t to articulate anything that hadn’t been saying before but to make the case for the American colonies in plain terms and persuade the world to see common sense. “It was intended to be an expression of the American mind,” Jefferson explains. He goes on to claim that “[the Declaration’s] authority rests then on the harmonizing sentiments of the day.” (Jefferson to Henry Lee, May 8, 1825)

Jefferson finished his timeless defense of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” in little more than two weeks, and like most writers, he was no stranger to the revision process. Between the Committee of Five and the Second Continental Congress, there were 86 edits to the document. The Second Continental Congress removed whole sections. Jefferson was most angered by the removal of one particular clause, a clause blaming the King for forcing the slave trade upon the American colonies.

The final draft of the Declaration of Independence contains a preamble, a list of grievances, a formal declaration of independence, and signatures.

Preamble
This first part of the Declaration contains an assertion of individual rights. Perhaps the most famous line states, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.” This part goes on to say that if the government tries to take these rights away, the people have the right to form a new government. Jefferson also addresses a counterclaim in this section, acknowledging that “Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes…” He counters by reminding his audience of the “long train of abuses and usurpations” that makes it “…their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Grievances
The longest part of the Declaration begins with “He has refused his Assent to Laws” and goes on to list the unfair actions of the British king and Parliament. In their complaints, the colonists make it clear that they are angry with the British king and government for taking away their rights as English citizens. They point out that the king has ignored or changed their colonial governments, as well as their rights to a trial by jury. The colonists accuse the king of sending a hired army to force them to obey unjust laws. They say the king is “unfit to be the ruler of a free people.”

Note: The norms and structure of argumentative writing in the 18th century were different from they are in the 21st century. The list of grievances that serves as the Declaration’s evidence seems largely anecdotal by today’s standards. However, the Declaration’s claim and underlying assumption (big idea) are especially applicable to the writing standards of 21st-century classrooms.

A formal declaration of independence
The final paragraph, beginning with “We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America,” affirms that the 13 colonies are free and independent states. It breaks all ties with the British government and people. As independent states, they can make trade agreements and treaties, wage war, and do whatever is necessary to govern themselves. This formal declaration of independence ends with important words. The words tell us what the signers of the Declaration of Independence were willing to give up for freedom: “…we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.”

Signatures
There are 56 signatures on the Declaration of Independence. Fifty men from 13 states signed the document on August 2 in 1776. The other six signed over the course of the next year and a half. As the President of the Second Continental Congress, John Hancock signed first. He wrote his name very large. Some of the men abbreviated their first names, like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. All the signers risked their lives when they signed the Declaration of Independence.

Legacy of the argument
Contrary to popular belief, the words of the Declaration of Independence did not gain immediate prominence. In fact, they remained obscure for decades. And yet the spirit of the Declaration caused ripples almost immediately, most famously with the French Revolution in 1789. The Haitian Revolution followed soon after, and the subsequent decades would see many Latin American countries continuing the fight for independence from colonial powers. In 1945, Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh also invoked the document when declaring Vietnamese independence from the French colonial empire.

Within the U.S., the women’s suffrage movement adapted the Declaration of Independence for their cause, asserting in the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments that “all men and women are created equal.” Meanwhile, the country’s celebrations of independence haunted enslaved people and abolitionists like Frederick Douglass, whose 1852 speech “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” pondered the nation’s shortcoming despite its dedication to values like liberty. As Douglass said, “This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn.”

As World War I came to a close, leaders from Eastern Europe gathered inside Independence Hall on October 26, 1918, to sign the Declaration of Common Aims of the Independent Mid-European Nations. Those gathering in Independence Hall that day sought to bring autonomy to the nations of the former Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires. The signers pledged their mutual support and their belief that “it is the inalienable right of every people to organize their own governments on such principles and in such forms as they believe will best promote their welfare, safety, and happiness.”

After the signing ceremony, Doctor Thomas Masaryk, the first president of Czechoslovakia, read the Declaration of Common Aims on Independence Square, just as John Nixon read the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776.

Read more from the National Archives here.

Background of the Sons of the American Revolution

Chartered in 2007, Colonel James Wood, II Chapter has grown into one of the best chapters in the state of Virginia, being named the best chapter 8 times in 13 years and receiving numerous awards. Based in the Northern Shenandoah Valley, the Chapter covers a five-county area of Frederick, Clarke, Page, Warren, and Shenandoah Counties plus the City of Winchester.

The chapter continually supports the purposes of the Sons of the American Revolution which are patriotic, historical, and educational. They strive to ensure that the patriots who gave us the United States of America are not forgotten; to promote patriotism in support of our country and its modern-day heroes and; to support teaching the history and values of the American Revolution and our constitutional freedoms.

The Objects of this Society are declared to be patriotic, historical, and educational; to unite and promote fellowship among the descendants of those who sacrificed to achieve the independence of the American people, to inspire them and the community-at-large with more profound reverence for the principles of the government founded by our forefathers; to foster true patriotism; to maintain and extend the institutions of American freedom.

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Community Events

Musket workshop hosted by the Colonel James Wood II Chapter of the Virginia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

Published

on

Left to Right: Sean Carrigan, Brett Osborn, Bill Schwetke, Marty Keesecker, Chip Daniel, Art LaFlam and Steve Englebright

On June 27, 2020, the Colonel James Wood II Chapter of the Virginia Society of the Sons of the American Revolution hosted a second musket workshop. This event was held to instruct individuals on the proper commands, safety procedures and firing actions to fire black powder muskets from the colonial era. No projectiles are fired, as these individuals become certified to participate in Sons of the American Revolution Musket Salute ceremonies.

Virginia State Color Guardsman of the Year, Brett Osborn, provided the instructions. Sean Carrigan was the demonstrator for the following individuals: Bill Schwetke, Marty Keesecker, Chip Daniel, Art LaFlam, Steve Englebright, Nathan Poe, Marc Robinson and Dale Corey.

The entire squad preparing to fire a three shot volley

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Community Events

Virtual children activities by Samuels Public Library for the month of July

Published

on

These are the virtual programs taking place in the Youth Services Department of Samuels Public Library for the month of July. Programs can be viewed from the Samuels Library Facebook page or YouTube channel. More information about Samuels Library and the programs and services available can be found at www.samuelslibrary.net or by calling (540) 635-3153.

Children, teens, and adults are challenged to Dig Deeper: Read. Investigate. Discover. Samuels Library’s Summer Reading Clubs have begun, and readers are invited to register for Summer Reading Club, log their books read, complete challenges, attend virtual programs, and collect badges online. Then come to the library for your prizes when it reopens!


Wednesday, July 1

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, July 2

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  Red, White, and Blue will be theme of our stories this week!  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Tuesday, July 7

  • 2:00 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  How far can you make a rocket fly?  Let’s find out!  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, July 8

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, July 9

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  Join Miss Pattie for some Beach Moments in our stories this week!  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Friday, July 10

  • 11:00 The Sounds and Movements of Summer.  Join Karen Erikkson-Lee from the Northern Virginia Academy of Ballet for some singing, dancing, and stories inspired by the sights and sounds of summer. Appropriate for preschool through 1st grade.  This program can be viewed on the Samuels Library Facebook page.
  • 2:00 The Story of Dance.  Join Karen Erikkson-Lee of the Northern Virginia Academy of Ballet for The Story of Dance.  Jazz, ballet, modern, and character steps will be taught alongside music and stories that will inspire the beginner through the advanced dancer!  Learn specific steps in different genres of dance, hear stories about dancers and composers, choreographers, and ballets. This class will be fun and informative!  For children of all ages.  This program can be viewed from the Samuels Library Facebook page.

Saturday, July 11

  • 11:00 Virtual Books and Barks.  Join Finn and his owner Susan for a reverse Books and Barks session.  Enjoy a good book with a very friendly dog!  Children can watch on the Samuels Library Facebook page or YouTube channel.

Monday, July 13

  • 2:00 Virtual Symphony of Sound.  This series of programs explores many sounds, including sounds found in nature and the science of sound as well as musical instruments. Children will be able to explore many kinds of sounds and reflect creatively on them as well as create their own sounds via crafts.  This week we will explore the woodwind family of instruments.  Intended for ages 6 – 11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Tuesday, July 14

  • 2:00 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  This week we will learn about levers, and how to make a catapult!  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, July 15

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, July 16

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  Let’s Go Buggie!  Join Miss Pattie for some great stories about insects and other creatures.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Friday, July 17

  • 11:00 The Sounds and Movements of Summer.  Join Karen Erikkson-Lee from the Northern Virginia Academy of Ballet for some singing, dancing, and stories inspired by the sights and sounds of summer. Appropriate for preschool through 1st grade.  This program can be viewed from the Samuels Library Facebook page.
  • 2:00 The Story of Dance.  Join Karen Erikkson-Lee of the Northern Virginia Academy of Ballet for The Story of Dance.  Jazz, ballet, modern, and character steps will be taught alongside music and stories that will inspire the beginner through the advanced dancer!  Learn specific steps in different genres of dance, hear stories about dancers and composers, choreographers, and ballets. This class will be fun and informative!  For children of all ages.  This program can be viewed from the Samuels Library Facebook page.

Saturday, July 18

  • 11:00 Virtual Dig Deep: Virginia.  Join Ms. Michal as we explore rock hounding in Virginia.  She will share her treasures with you and show you where to find them.  You’ll be amazed at the many different gems to be found in Virginia!  Look for the program to be posted on Samuels Library’s Facebook page and YouTube channel.

Tuesday, July 21

  • 2:00 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  Everyone loves bubbles!  Find out how to make your own!  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, July 22

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, July 23

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  It’s summer, so Let’s Go Visit!  Miss Pattie’s stories will take us on some fun trips this week!  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Friday, July 24

  • 11:00 Meet Cowboy the Dancing Dog and his owner Evelyne for some rollicking, dancing fun for children of all ages!  This program can be viewed on the Samuels Library Facebook page or YouTube channel.

Monday, July 27

  • 2:00 Virtual Symphony of Sound.  This series of programs explores many sounds, including sounds found in nature and the science of sound as well as musical instruments. Children will be able to explore many kinds of sounds and reflect creatively on them as well as create their own sounds via crafts.  This week, join us for a musical story time!  Intended for ages 5 – 11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Tuesday, July 28

  • 2:00 Virtual Science Scouts.  Explore the mysteries of the world through science!  In this weekly program, we will discuss and perform hands-on investigations of STEM-related topics.  Learn the chemistry you need to know in order to make your own ice cream!  Intended for ages 6-11.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Wednesday, July 29

  • 7:00 Goodnight, Sweetheart!  Virtual Pajama Story Time.  It’s time for bed!  Join Miss Pattie for some sweet bedtime stories.  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Thursday, July 30

  • 10:00 Virtual Story Time.  Our stories will be about Summertime Fun!  Join Miss Pattie for stories, songs, and a craft!  Watch on the Samuels Library Facebook Page or YouTube Channel.

Friday, July 31

  • 1:00 Virtual Discuss This.  Join Ms. Michal for a virtual teen discussion group.  Are you inspired by good books, articles, movies, and art? Do you write, draw, or enjoy playing music? If so, join us as we discuss books and share our creations. This is a group for those who wish to talk seriously about a variety of topics.  Sign up in advance to participate on a platform to be determined.  For ages 12-18.
Share the News:
Continue Reading

Community Events

Samuels Public Library Adult Programming events for July

Published

on

All of our programs will take place over Zoom and will require you to register on our website at samuelslibrary.net in the events tab. Zoom is accessible as a website or as an app you can download to your phone. If you need help setting up Zoom on your device, please call the Adult Reference desk at 540-635-3153 ext. 105.


Books & Beyond Discussion Group

Join us for our book club discussion time! This program will take place over Zoom. You will need to provide an email as well as a device that has Zoom on it. Wednesday, July 1st at 10:00 A.M.

How to use Ancestry and Heritage Quest

Erin Rooney will be teaching us how to use Ancestry and Heritage Quest, two super popular online databases for anyone interested in genealogy. This program will take place over Zoom. Wednesday, July 8th at 6:30 P.M.

Dig into Art with Strokes of Creativity

Join Teresa Henry, owner of Strokes of Creativity, for a special art workshop that is designed to awaken your creative spirit. Each participant will paint and embellish a unique, aquatic-themed wall plaque. If the library is closed this class will be taught online and craft kits will be made available to participants through curbside pickup. Class size is limited so register early! Saturday, July 11th at 2:00 P.M.

How to use Hoopla

Join us as we dig deeper into our databases! Erly Moya will be teaching us how to use Hoopla, our brand new database that has a wide selection of ebooks, audiobooks, movies, television shows, and music! This program will take place over Zoom. Monday, July 13th at 10:00 A.M.

Thinking about Homeschooling this Fall? A Guide for Parents

FOSL hosts a special Zoom program with Mitzi Fox who will lead an interactive discussion to help parents make informed decisions about homeschooling.  Mitzi and other homeschoolers and local resources will share their experiences and provide practical guidance on what it really takes to be a parent-educator. Advice will be given on homeschooling styles, requirements, testing, curriculum resources, dealing with multiple ages, socialization, college admissions, and more. This program will take place over Zoom. Tuesday, July 14th at 6:00 P.M.

Books & Beyond Book Discussion Group

Join us for our book club discussion time! This program will take place over Zoom. You will need to provide an email as well as a device that has Zoom on it. Wednesday, July 15th at 10:00 A.M.

Hell Town Campfire Stories

Gather round as we tell you tales of Virginia lore with a twist. Filled with fiction, facts, and fun you won’t want to miss. Registration is not required for this pre-recorded event that will be posted on Samuel Public Library’s YouTube channel. If there are any questions or comments please email us at reference@samuelslibrary.net or call the Adult Reference desk at 540-635-3151 ext. 105. Wednesday, July 15th at 6:30 P.M.

Big Library Read Zoom Book Discussion: The Darwin Affair

Join us for an online discussion of OverDrive’s next Big Library Read, The Darwin Affair by Tim Mason. The next Big Library Read kicks off on June 22nd with the eBook and audiobook available for unlimited access through OverDrive June 22nd – July 13th This program will take place over Zoom. Thursday, July 16th at 6:00 P.M.

How to use Libby by Overdrive

Join us as we dig deeper into our databases! Sandra Norman will be teaching us how to use Libby by Overdrive, which provides thousands of ebooks, audiobooks, and movies that can be checked out with your library card! This program will take place over Zoom. Wednesday, July 22nd at 6:30 P.M.

Photography & Beyond

Join local photographer and educator Sharon Fisher for a bi-monthly photography workshop. The first sessions each month will be a presentation on a photographic subject or theme. The second session each month will be a sharing of images and real-time editing.  This workshop is appropriate for beginning, intermediate and advanced photographers using all types of cameras from smartphones to advance cameras with adjustable settings and special lenses. This program will take place over Zoom. Saturday, July 25th at 10 A.M.

How to use Novelist

Join us as we dig deeper into our databases! Kitti McKean will be teaching us how to use Novelist, a database that will help you find the perfect book to read next! This program will take place over Zoom. Wednesday, July 29th at 10:00 A.M.

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Community Events

Prom for WCHS & Skyline HS seniors scheduled for July 11

Published

on

Prom Under the Stars is the theme for a prom scheduled for Warren County and Skyline High School, Class of 2020, on July 11, 2020, at the Shenandoah Valley Golf Club. Rick Novak, owner of Royal Cinemas and Royal Family Bowling Center in Front Royal launched the idea to several other business owners and the prom was underway.

The prom will be held at Shenandoah Valley Golf Club from 6-11. The cost for each person is $25 a ticket. Each ticket includes entrance into the event, a plated dinner, and more. Seating may be limited. Tickets will be available for purchase through July 1, 2020. Rain date is July 12, 2020. Each senior may invite one guest.

Click here to register.

*Please note – To verify seniors are either WCHS or SHS, their names will be checked against a school-provided list. It is important for registration to be in the seniors’ names!

Sponsors for this event include Shenandoah Valley Golf Club, C & C Family Fun Day, Royal Cinemas, Royal Family Bowling Center, Harold & Terry Chunn (DJs), Apple House, Pepsi, Tolliver Studios Donahue’s Whimsical Flowers, LLC., etc.

Our publisher Mike McCool spoke with Rick Novak and Richard Runyon at the prom site in this exclusive Royal Examiner video:

Share the News:
Continue Reading

King Cartoons

Front Royal
86°
Partly Cloudy
5:52am8:41pm EDT
Feels like: 89°F
Wind: 7mph NNE
Humidity: 47%
Pressure: 29.91"Hg
UV index: 8
ThuFriSat
87/66°F
94/69°F
91/66°F