Connect with us

Local News

How Virginia’s data protection law will affect consumers, businesses

Published

on

Information technology experts say a new Virginia consumer data protection law could be more robust, but it will force businesses to rethink how they handle consumer data.

“This is the first time in Virginia that consumers will have the right to understand what data a company collects about them, and how they use that data and who they share it with,” said Andrew Miller, the co-founder of Workshop Digital, a Richmond-based digital marketing agency.

Senate Bill 1392 and House Bill 2307 are known as the Consumer Data Protection Act or CDPA. The governor signed both bills into law this month.

The CDPA allows Virginia residents to retrieve a copy of their personal online data and delete the data. Consumers can opt-out of allowing businesses to sell their data.



Personal data is information that can be linked to a consumer’s profile, according to Joseph Jerome, director of state advocacy at San Francisco-based Common Sense Media. The nonprofit rates movies, TV shows, and other media for age appropriateness and learning potential.

“It’s important to have a broad understanding of personal data,” said Jerome, a lawyer whose expertise includes cybersecurity and data privacy.

What data will be affected
The law defines personal data as information that is linked or reasonably linkable to a person.

“Consumers tend to think of personal information as something like their Social Security number or an email address, but new privacy regulations are really trying to get at the sorts of data that go into customer profiles,” Jerome said.

A company can attach traits to a user, such as the individual’s perceived race, education level, and political affiliation, according to Jerome.

“The issue isn’t so much what one single company collects, but rather how companies share data among themselves and use that information to infer even more about us,” he said.

Some companies track consumers’ location.
“If a person is at location A at time Y and location B at time Z, if those two locations are coordinates for your home and office, it’s pretty easy to infer who that person is,” Jerome said.

The CDPA impacts companies which handle the data of at least 100,000 consumers annually, or which control or process the data of at least 25,000 consumers and make over half of their gross revenue from selling data.

CDPA exceptions
There are exceptions. Companies won’t have to participate if they are protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act which restricts the release of medical information or the

Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act to protect health and financial data. The GLBA requires financial institutions to safeguard sensitive banking information.

“So in certain scenarios, Google is a business associate under HIPAA,” Jerome said. “Apple offers financial products on its iPhone, you know, has the Apple credit card.”

The Virginia measure is different from the 2018 California Consumer Privacy Act. The California law also regulates how companies buy, sell, license, and share data but with stricter parameters in place. California’s voters recently voted to amend and strengthen the privacy act, with the changes going into effect in 2023. Unlike the Virginia law, California consumers can pursue legal action for a breach of certain information. In Virginia, the attorney general’s office would handle the enforcement of the CDPA, from consumer complaints to the enforcement of fines.

The California law impacted businesses in Virginia, such as Richmond-based IT consulting firm CapTech. The company helps clients bring IT systems into compliance with the California law, said CapTech Principal Peter Carr.

“It affected our business in that it gave us more opportunities to sell into our clients and to help them with their problems around privacy,” Carr said.

Businesses predict impact
CapTech is preparing for Virginia’s new data protection law to go into effect.

“I briefed my partners on the law, we made some projections as to how much business we could generate from this law and how many clients this could apply to,” Carr said.

Other experts in the data field speculate that the CDPA could force businesses to rethink the value of consumer data. Miller, the co-founder of Workshop Digital, said companies can highlight how they protect consumer data to stand out from competitors.

“When you’re telling your customers that we actually care about your data, we keep it secure, here’s how you can access it and what you can ask for us to remove, then I think it shows that the business is aligned with the customer,” Miller said.

He also said the CDPA could move the focus from the collection of data to the protection of consumer data.

“If it passes as it’s written now, it’ll mostly affect larger businesses or companies that aggregate and collect a lot of data about Virginia consumers or citizens,” Miller said. “It’ll force companies to rethink how they capture data, what they use it for, how much data they actually need and start to pivot towards having a privacy-driven message to their consumers.”

Consumers will have the ability to exert some control over how their data is used by businesses and across the internet, according to Randy Franklin, the vice-president and general manager at Terazo, a Richmond-based software, and platform development company.

“This bill is important for consumers because consumers are increasingly aware of the fact that they are tracked in their online activities,” Franklin said. “They want to understand that the information that these providers and businesses are collecting on them is used in a manner that aligns with how they would like to see that information be used.”

Concerns over data protection act
Jerome said Common Sense Media has concerns about the bill and said several things are still unclear. People do not read privacy policies and can be overwhelmed by choices such as requesting or deleting personal information, he added.

“We’re not entirely sure how it’ll be enforced, there are a number of provisions in the law that are, for a lack of a better word, squishy,” Jerome said. “That said, you know, it certainly creates a baseline set of protections that don’t exist for Virginians.”

Furthermore, to be effective, Miller said the bill requires that Virginia consumers are informed about their rights to access their data.

“The way it’s written now is it puts the emphasis on the consumer to request their data or request their data to be deleted,” Miller said. “It doesn’t obligate a company to do that proactively without the consumer requesting it.”

Miller and Jerome hope the CDPA will encourage discussion in Congress and help create a broader national data protection law.

“It’s the first step towards figuring out what a national data protection or data privacy law could look like, which would benefit consumers everywhere rather than just having a patchwork of state-specific laws and regulations,” Miller said.

The Consumer Data Protection Act will take effect in January 2023. The chairman of the Joint Commission on Technology and Science will establish a workgroup to review the bill and report any issues related to its implementation by November 1.

By Hyung Jun Lee
Capital News Service

Capital News Service is a program of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Robertson School of Media and Culture. Students in the program provide state government coverage for a variety of media outlets in Virginia.

Share the News:

Crime/Court

Accused Brinklow murderer gets 30-years-9-months on plea agreement and probation violation charges

Published

on

Following emotional testimony from Jennifer Brinklow, the mother of 20-year-old Tristen Brinklow on the devastating impact on her life of her son’s 2019 murder, and a perhaps surprisingly emotional series of apologies from his accused killer for his role in that murder, the Commonwealth and defense counsels debated at which end of sentencing guidelines 38-year-old Richard Matthew Crouch should be incarcerated on Second Degree Murder and related and unrelated charges he submitted guilty pleas to as part of a plea agreement.

By plea agreement already accepted by Warren County Circuit Court Judge William Sharp, the sentencing range was between 8-years-and-7-months and 28 years-and-9-months. The other involved suspect, George Good, received a 10-year prison sentence with 25 years suspended on August 13, on a similar plea agreement involving two charges of helping Crouch dispose of Brinklow’s body and a variety of unrelated charges. Good was 29 at the time of his sentencing three months ago.

After hearing about an hour and a half of testimony, questions, and arguments Judge Sharp adjourned to chambers at noon, Monday, November 29th to consider his sentencing decision. After 17 minutes Judge Sharp returned to deliver his ruling. That ruling was the high-end 28-years-and-9-months according to sentencing parameters of the plea agreement, after imposing two, 5-year sentences on concealing and defiling (allowing to decompose) a dead body; and 30 years on the Second Degree Murder charge. Crouch will also get credit for time served, about two years. It was said that currently it is estimated that inmates will serve about 85% of their sentence with good behavior time taken off. Crouch also had four, 5-year sentences related to an earlier attack on an ex-girlfriend and his drug possession with intent to distribute charges imposed with all 20 years suspended. He will be on supervised probation for five years after his release.

While getting credit for his time served, two years was later tacked on to the 28-year-9-month sentence, on a probation violation charge argued outside the plea agreement. Arguing that aspect of the cases, Assistant Commonwealth Attorney Nick Manthos countered defense co-counsel Eric Wiseley’s call to waive the two additional years of active incarceration after his client received nearly three times the sentence George Good did for their respective roles in Brinklow’s murder.


Richard Matthew Crouch in July 2021 mug shot from Northwestern Adult Regional Detention Center. Below, charged as an accessory in the murder of Tristen Brinklow, George Lee Good (Oct. 2020 RSW Jail mug shot). Good received 10 years of active incarceration for his believed role in the killing. On Monday Crouch was sentenced to a total of 30 years and 9 months.

Manthos, as Commonwealth Attorney John Bell had earlier, noted that while Crouch held to his story that it was Good who actually beat Brinklow to death, the physical evidence matched Good’s story that it was Crouch who attacked and strangled Brinklow to death in a methamphetamine-induced paranoid delusional state. Crouch did admit to being up for at least five days straight, perhaps as many as 10 days, doing an extraordinary amount of methamphetamine – he estimated at 3.5 grams (an 8-ball) to twice that amount per day – while trying to finance being on the run from police from an incident several days earlier in which he non-fatally had strangled an ex-girlfriend.

The Commonwealth noted that in his earlier attack on the ex-girlfriend, Crouch had not only choked her but cut off a large portion of her hair. When Good led authorities to Brinklow’s decomposed body, a bone in the neck was discovered broken at autopsy indicative of strangulation, and a large portion of Brinklow’s hair was discovered cut off. Those aspects of the earlier Crouch attack on the ex-girlfriend were not known to Good, the prosecution told the court.

The fact that all the crimes he enter guilty pleas to, including the assault on his ex, the methamphetamine use, and dealing, as well as Brinklow’s murder, occurred while Crouch was on probation led Judge Sharp to side with the prosecution on the necessity of imposing the two probation violation years hanging over Crouch – “There has to be a consequence, otherwise probation means nothing,” Judge Sharp said in rendering his decision on that second part of the day’s hearing on Crouch’s fate behind bars.

While admitting to the drug use and paranoid state leading him to believe that he was going to be robbed of his meth stash worth several thousand dollars, Crouch insisted that Brinklow coming at him with a knife and Good’s response of pulling him off Crouch and beating him to death was not a part of his drug-induced delusions. However, it seemed Crouch and his attorney in the plea sentencing, Howard Manheimer, may have been the only two in court buying into that scenario. It appeared seven relatives and friends accompanied Jennifer Brinklow to court Monday.
Several times asked by the court if he had anything to say before decisions were rendered, Crouch in a low, emotional voice expressed remorse, saying, “I am so sorry, I am so sorry with all my heart.” Crouch told the court and Brinklow’s mother that he had become involved in a jailhouse ministry conducted at RSW and related drug abuse counseling to try and steer inmates away from drug addiction upon their release.

He also looked at Tristen’s mother testifying from the witness box directly in front of him as she recounted the multiple impacts, including being told she now suffers from PTSD (Post Traumatic Shock Disorder) in the wake of her son’s murder. “I didn’t know a person could live without a heart and soul,” Mrs. Brinklow told the courtroom of her life since December 13, 2019, when she was informed it was her missing son’s body discovered in an abandoned freezer near the river. The murder occurred in September 2019.

She said tears came often, stimulated by “a smell, food, a cloud – ANYTHING. I never had anxiety, now there are places I can’t go without breaking down … It’s beyond obvious those two did not know Trey – a few minutes with him and he’d give you anything he had … Four days after he turned 20 you took his life – he was just a kid.”

 

Tristen Brinklow’s photo from the family social media page was reproduced and displayed in court Monday in support of his mother Jennifer Brinklow’s testimony as an auxiliary victim of her son’s murder. The second photo of him with his mother and grandmother was also displayed. Below, ‘Justice for Trey’ demonstrators outside George Good’s plea agreement hearing in August. More support was promised during Monday’s plea hearing for Richard Matthew Crouch.

Following the rendering of his plea agreement sentence of 28-years-9-months, Judge Sharp told Crouch he hoped he made the best out of the portion of his life that will now be spent in prison; that he was truly remorseful for letting a dangerous, illegal drug get a grip on his life that led to this point; and that he would continue to work to counsel others away from a similar fate, and turn his life in a positive direction.

“I wish you luck,” the judge told Crouch.

“Thank you,” Crouch replied.

 

Share the News:

Continue Reading

Local News

Celebrating three DECA alumni during “DECA Month”

Published

on

November is “DECA Month” and to cap several activities that WCHS DECA has conducted this month, the chapter would like to promote the accomplishments of three DECA alumni.

Alexandra “Lexi” Davis

Alexandra “Lexi” Davis (2019) is currently a senior at James Madison University.  Lexi not only is a WCHS DECA alumna, but a past Chapter Historian officer as well. When asked how her past experiences in DECA have impacted her personal life, she replied, “DECA has taught me how to present formally, talk to people, and knowing how to sell myself to clients and employers”.  As to what advice she would give to a 1st year DECA member, Lexi stated, “put yourself out there as in getting involved in the community, compete in as many DECA events as you can, and try new things.”  Her favorite memory of DECA? Going to Orlando Florida to compete in the DECA International Career Development Conference, being around her friends throughout all her years in DECA, and managing the school store, Wildcats Corner.   Lexi was instrumental in having Wildcats Corner receive its initial Gold Level Certification as a school-based enterprise.  Although she is an engineering major at JMU, Lexi attributes her ability to present engineering project ideas to potential clients due to her involvement and success with DECA projects.

Leonard Maiden

Dr. Leonard F. “Len” Maiden (1950) was the 1st Chapter President of the Warren County High School DECA chapter. In 1949, Len was elected as the 1st High School President of National DECA.  After graduating from WCHS, he earned degrees from Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Virginia, and the University of South Carolina. He was a veteran of the United States Army. In 1965 he joined the University of South Carolina faculty where he retired as Professor Emeritus of the College of Education.  Before joining the faculty at USC, he served as a Virginia State Supervisor for Marketing (Distributive) Education where he mentored marketing teachers and DECA chapter advisors in the Front Royal/Winchester/Northern Virginia region. Throughout his career, Dr. Maiden never lost his love for DECA.  He volunteered for many years as a judge in DECA state conferences in both Virginia and South Carolina.  He mentored students learning to become teachers and teachers learning to improve their craft for many years.  In 2021, the WCHS DECA Chapter established an annual scholarship to be awarded to a graduating WCHS DECA senior in his honor.

Sarah Gardner

Sarah Gardner is a 2016 high school graduate and alumna of James Madison University (2020).  She is also a professional member of the WCHS DECA chapter.  While in high school, Sarah was a member of her high school DECA chapter and served as the chapter’s president her senior year.  She was also a district winner, 3-time state winner, and competed in DECA’s International Career Development Conference three times.  She has served Virginia DECA as a State Leadership Conference judge for three years.  Currently, Sarah is a Senior Marketing Coordinator with Carahsoft Technology Corp. in Reston, VA.  When asked how her high school DECA experiences helped to prepare her for life after high school, she responded, “DECA taught me how to present myself in a professional setting.”  “DECA also taught me time management skills – mentoring other people, planning and executing projects, and writing research papers – and how to apply constructive criticism in order to improve as a marketing professional”, she added.  When asked what advice she would offer a first-year DECA member, Sarah stated, “Don’t be afraid to fall short or fail.  Just put forth your best effort and learn from the results!”

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local News

The Wildlife Center of Virginia to provide Thanksgiving meals for 100+ wild animals

Published

on

Staff at The Wildlife Center of Virginia are getting ready for a Thanksgiving feast for over 100 “guests”. Species on the “guest list” include Red-tailed Hawks, Eastern Screech-Owls, Bald Eagles, Black Bears, Deer Mice, and reptiles including Eastern Box Turtles, Eastern Ratsnakes, and a Snapping Turtle.

On November 25, the Center anticipates to be caring for approximately 90 patients and 20 resident education animals. Wildlife rehabilitators will be preparing and delivering meals, cleaning enclosures, and updating patient records.

Photo / The Wildlife Center of Virginia

Turkey, mashed potatoes, and cranberry sauce aren’t on the Wildlife Center menus – instead of a traditional family-style Thanksgiving meal, the Wildlife Center crew will make dozens of species-specific diets, which cater to each species’ needs and each patient’s particular preferences based on observations during their time as patients at the Center.


“The animals that we will be caring for this year include over 30 reptiles, over 20 birds of prey, and almost 20 squirrels” said Wildlife Rehabilitation Supervisor Kelsey Pleasants. “Most of these patients have been admitted after being hit by cars or caught by domestic pets. Many of them require weeks of intensive care and rehabilitation.”

While the rehabilitation staff are busy in the kitchen, Center veterinarians will provide medical care for patients in need – distributing and administering medications, cleaning wounds and changing bandages, completing daily checks, and other medical procedures – and remain ready for any new patients that might arrive. New patient admissions are always a possibility, any day of the year. By the time the staff go home to their Thanksgiving dinners, all 110 animals will be fed, watered, and cared for.

The Wildlife Center of Virginia is a non-profit hospital that is able to provide quality healthcare to wild animals in need through the generosity and support of caring individuals. “We’re so appreciative of the support of our donors that helps us to feed and care for each bird, mammal, and reptile,” said Pleasants.

To find out more about ways to support the Wildlife Center of Virginia’s work, the public can visit www.wildlifecenter.org.

Share the News:

Continue Reading

Legislative Update

Front Royal-Warren County Airport receives $790,000 in funding from infrastructure deal signed into law last week

Published

on

On the busiest air travel day of the year, U.S. Sens. Mark R. Warner and Tim Kaine (both D-VA) announced that airports in Virginia are expected to receive $399,740,660 in federal funds over the next five years as a result of the bipartisan infrastructure deal signed into law last week.

The funding will be distributed to Virginia airports over five years as follows:

• Washington Dulles International: $120,399,725
• Ronald Reagan Washington National: $116,734,485
• Richmond International: $35,608,215
• Norfolk International: $33,098,390
• Charlottesville-Albemarle: $15,444,835
• Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional: $14,977,645
• Newport News/Williamsburg International: $10,194,005
• Lynchburg Regional/Preston Glenn Field: $6,497,230
• Shenandoah Valley Regional: $5,066,130
• Manassas Regional/Harry P. Davis Field: $3,735,000
• Leesburg Executive: $3,735,000
• Virginia Highlands: $1,480,000
• Virginia Tech/Montgomery Executive: $1,480,000
• Culpeper Regional: $1,480,000
• Danville Regional: $1,480,000
• New River Valley: $1,480,000
• Blue Ridge: $1,480,000
• Chesapeake Regional: $1,480,000
• Hampton Roads Executive: $1,480,000
• Richmond Executive-Chesterfield County: $1,480,000
• Hanover County Municipal: $1,480,000
• Warrenton-Fauquier: $1,480,000
• Winchester Regional: $1,480,000
• Franklin Regional: $790,000
• Front Royal-Warren County: $790,000
• Twin County: $790,000
• Louisa County/Freeman Field: $790,000
• Luray Caverns: $790,000
• Mountain Empire: $790,000
• Accomack County: $790,000
• Orange County: $790,000
• Dinwiddie County: $790,000
• New Kent County: $790,000
• William M. Tuck: $790,000
• Mecklenburg-Brunswick Regional: $790,000
• Stafford Regional: $790,000
• Suffolk Executive: $790,000
• Tappahannock-Essex County: $790,000
• Middle Peninsula Regional: $790,000
• Emporia-Greensville Regional: $550,000
• Farmville Regional: $550,000
• Ingalls Field: $550,000
• Lee County: $550,000
• Tazewell County: $550,000
• Tangier Island: $550,000
• Lonesome Pine: $550,000
• Brookneal/Campbell County: $550,000

The funding represents Virginia’s share of $15 billion in direct grants to airports expected around the country as a result of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, a bipartisan, once-in-a-generation investment in our nation’s infrastructure and competitiveness that was negotiated by Sen. Warner and strongly supported by Sen. Kaine.


Share the News:

Continue Reading

Local News

Blue Ridge Wildlife Center Patient of the Week: Gray Treefrog

Published

on

Your outdoor plants may be full of surprises!

It’s that time of year where many people bring potted plants indoors for the winter, but that means it’s also the time of year when people realize they may have brought in more than just their plants!

Photos / Blue Ridge Wildlife Center

This Gray Treefrog experienced just that, as the plant he was hiding on was brought into a warm room for the winter.

Because of the warmer temperatures, this frog stopped preparing for winter and became much more active, finally being discovered by the homeowner.



Because the frog had become acclimated to warmer temperatures, and the lows have been below freezing, it was decided it would not be safe for the frog to be placed back outside. Instead, the frog was brought to us for us to overwinter until next spring.

Check your plants before bringing them inside! If you find an amphibious stowaway, give us or your local rehabilitator a call before taking further action, so we can best assess the health of the animal and give you the best advice, keeping weather and natural behavior in mind.

If you want to avoid potentially disturbing wildlife, bring in your plants early before temperatures drop too low. That way, if you find any stowaways, you can simply place them back outside with plenty of time for them to find a new winter home.

This Gray Treefrog is our 3,171 patient in 2021!

We are fortunate to be able to provide a safe environment for amphibians to overwinter – but it comes at a price.

Our patients can’t pay for their care, and we don’t receive state or Federal funding for what we do. We rely on your donations to help wild animals and return them to their wild homes.

Giving Tuesday is in one week! In addition to a match provided by Facebook, our generous board of directors will match Giving Tuesday donations up to $15,000!

Please, donate to BRWC on Tuesday, November 30th, to make a big impact for wildlife!

Share the News:

Continue Reading

Local News

Samuels Public Library offers free at-home COVID-19 tests

Published

on

Samuels Public Library joins 18 other libraries and library systems state-wide offering free at-home COVID-19 tests through a partnership with the Virginia Department of Health (VDH). The pilot program runs through Friday, December 31.

Individuals may pick up a virtually-guided Abbott BinaxNow COVID-19 Antigen Card Home Test at Samuels Public Library, use it in the privacy of their own home and receive digital test results in 15 minutes. A library card is not required to receive a test. The program is designed to increase access to COVID-19 testing, especially among rural and remote communities.

“We are thrilled to collaborate with VDH to provide this simple, accessible avenue for testing in Warren County,” says Michelle Ross, Executive Director of Samuels Public Library. “Libraries play an important role in public health by offering free access to information, this service strengthens and extends that role.”

The at-home test kit uses the eMed digital platform. Users will need an internet-connected device enabled with a camera and microphone (smartphone or laptop) to join a virtual testing session with an eMed assistant. The eMed assistant will guide users through the testing process. Once the test is complete, the user will receive results within 15 minutes and eMed will report the results to VDH.


Individuals may request a test through curbside pick-up or at the Samuels Public Library circulation desk. If you are demonstrating symptoms, please use curbside pick-up and do not enter the library. For safety reasons, tests may not be taken inside the library. The library’s public wireless internet is accessible in the parking lot. VDH recommends tests be used within two weeks to avoid expiration.

About Samuels Public Library

Samuels Public Library brings people, information and ideas together to enrich lives and build community. A 501(c)(3) organization, the library annually serves 200,000 visitors, checks out nearly 400,000 books, electronic and digital services, and provides essential computer access, wireless service and public meeting spaces for the community. To learn more, visit www.samuelslibrary.net or call (540) 635-3153.

Share the News:

Continue Reading

 

Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

@AHIER

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Family Preservation Services

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

Groups Recover Together

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Main Street Travel

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Mountain Trails

National Media Services

Northwestern Community Services Board

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Examiner

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Salvation Army

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

Studio Verde

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

Front Royal
34°
Cloudy
7:11am4:51pm EST
Feels like: 34°F
Wind: 1mph NE
Humidity: 65%
Pressure: 30.09"Hg
UV index: 0
WedThuFri
55/45°F
64/43°F
57/37°F

Upcoming Events

Dec
1
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 1 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
4
Sat
10:00 am Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Dec 4 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Senior Painting Class with Dottie @ Strokes of Creativity
Senior Painting Class with Dottie at Strokes of Creativity. Tickets: CLICK HERE Cost: $80 for 6 weeks Dates: Thursdays – Oct 21, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18, Dec 4 Time: 10 am[...]
1:00 pm The Nutcracker 2021 @ Skyline High School
The Nutcracker 2021 @ Skyline High School
Dec 4 @ 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Nutcracker 2021 @ Skyline High School
Italia Performing Arts is pleased to announce its own student production of the seasonal ballet The Nutcracker, to be presented in Front Royal, VA, on Saturday, December 4th, 2021. 1:00 and 5:00 pm Tickets: $35[...]
4:30 pm Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Dec 4 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Astronomy for Everyone @ Sky Meadows State Park
Meets in the Historic Area behind Mount Bleak. Discover our International Dark Sky Park! Our evenings begin with a half-hour children’s “Junior Astronomer” program, followed by a discussion about the importance of dark skies and[...]
Dec
5
Sun
4:00 pm Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ First Baptist Church of Winchester
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ First Baptist Church of Winchester
Dec 5 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ First Baptist Church of Winchester
Sunday, December 5, 2021 4:00pm First Baptist Church of Winchester 205 West Piccadilly St. | Winchester, VA 22601 COVID-19 Guidelines: Masks are required for attendees Friday, December 10, 2021 7:30pm Front Royal United Methodist Church[...]
Dec
8
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 8 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]
Dec
10
Fri
7:30 pm Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Dec 10 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Front Royal United Methodist Church
Friday, December 10, 2021 7:30pm Front Royal United Methodist Church 1 West Main Street | Front Royal, VA 22630 COVID-19 Guidelines: Masks are required for attendees Sunday, December 12, 2021 4:00pm Trinity Episcopal Church 9108[...]
Dec
12
Sun
3:00 pm Valley Chorale’s Christmas Concert @ Calvary Episcopal Church
Valley Chorale’s Christmas Concert @ Calvary Episcopal Church
Dec 12 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Valley Chorale's Christmas Concert @ Calvary Episcopal Church
This year’s yuletide concert is titled THIS SHINING NIGHT.  Join us for a selection of seasonal songs — ranging in style from classical to spirituals to pop — sure to brighten your holiday and lift[...]
4:00 pm Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Trinity Episcopal Church
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Trinity Episcopal Church
Dec 12 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Sweeter, Still… Holiday Concert @ Trinity Episcopal Church
Sunday, December 12, 2021 4:00pm Trinity Episcopal Church 9108 John Mosby Hwy. | Upperville, VA 20184 COVID-19 Guidelines: Masks are required for attendees
Dec
15
Wed
6:30 pm Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Dec 15 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Front Royal Wednesday Night Bingo @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptartment
Bingo to support the American Cancer Society mission, organized by Relay For Life of Front Royal. Every Wednesday evening Early Bird Bingo at 6:30 p.m. Regular Bingo from 7-9:30 p.m. Food and refreshments available More[...]