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Athletes earn honors on Randolph-Macon Academy Spring Sports Teams

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Many Randolph-Macon Academy students participated on an athletic team during the spring 2019 season. Some of these students stood out in the view of their teammates and coaches, and even within the overall conference. They were recognized at the spring sports awards ceremonies.

Sophia Wagner of Front Royal, VA received the Coaches’ Award for the girls’ varsity soccer team. She was also named to the First Team, All-Conference in the Delaney Athletic Conference. Sophia, the daughter of Eddie and Stephanie Wagner of Front Royal, VA, was an eighth grade student at R-MA during the 2018-19 school year.

Sophia Wagner of Front Royal

Benjamin Murphy of Front Royal, VA received the Co-Most Improved Player Award for the middle school tennis team. Ben, the son of Gary Murphy and Barbara Bernard of Front Royal, VA, was a seventh grade student at R-MA during the 2018-19 school year.

Benjamin Murphy of Front Royal

Randolph-Macon Academy (R-MA), founded in 1892, is a college-preparatory, coeducational boarding school for students in grades 6 through 12. Students in grades 9-12 participate in R-MA’s 91st Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC), and have the opportunity to learn to fly through a unique flight program. The Academy also offers several summer programs. R-MA is affiliated with the United Methodist Church and is located in Front Royal, VA.

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I-66 Outside the Beltway Project: Lane closures and traffic changes – Week of January 19, 2020

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Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project construction continues throughout the corridor during daytime and overnight hours as weather conditions allow. Current activities include:

• Bridge demolition at Route 29 in Centreville

• Constructing bridge foundations at Compton Road, Route 28, Route 123, Vaden Drive, and I-495

• Small charge dynamite operations along I-66 East and West near Route 28

• Bridge deck work for new collector-distributor road over Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) and new Route 28 bridges over I-66

• Relocating water lines at Jermantown Road, Stringfellow Road, and Gallows Road

• Constructing new utility duct bank and relocating underground utilities along I-66 East

• Constructing retaining walls along I-66 and Route 28

• Corridor-wide roadway maintenance as needed

The Transform 66 Outside the Beltway project will add express lanes stretching 22.5 miles from the Capital Beltway to Route 29 in Gainesville, rebuild major interchanges along the I-66 corridor, create thousands of new park and ride spaces, and expand trail options for cyclists and pedestrians. Learn more at Transform66.org.

The Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project will add express lanes stretching 22.5 miles from the Capital Beltway to Route 29 in Gainesville, rebuild major interchanges along the I-66 corridor, create thousands of new park and ride spaces, and expand trail options for cyclists and pedestrians. Learn more at Transform66.org.

Upcoming Lane Closures and Traffic Changes
The following planned lane closures are expected to have significant traffic impacts. All work is subject to change based on weather and schedule. Find the latest information on travel conditions and work zones by visiting 511virginia.org or downloading the Virginia511 app.

ROUTE 29 / GAINESVILLE
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

ROUTE 234 BUSINESS (SUDLEY ROAD) / MANASSAS
I-66 East and West between Sudley Road and Bull Run Rest Area
Ramps from Sudley Road to I-66 East
Tuesday, Jan. 21, through Friday, Jan. 24: 11 a.m. to noon
Temporary 15-minute stoppages of traffic on I-66 East and West for blasting operations. Additionally, stoppages will occur on the ramp from Sudley Road to I-66 East. Stoppages may also be needed on Vandor Lane.

ROUTE 28 (SULLY ROAD) / CENTREVILLE
I-66 East and West between Route 29 Centreville and Stringfellow Road
Route 28 North and South between Route 29 and Braddock Road
Ramp from Route 28 North to I-66 East
Tuesday, Jan. 21, through Friday, Jan. 24: 11 a.m. to noon
Temporary 15-minute stoppages of traffic on I-66 East and West, and Route 28 North and South for blasting operations. Additionally, stoppages will occur on the ramp from Route 28 North to I-66 East and on the ramp from Route 28 North to I-66 West.

Route 29 Centreville North and South at I-66
Sunday, Jan. 19: 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 21, and Wednesday, Jan. 22: 8 p.m. to 5 a.m.
The left lane will be closed on northbound and southbound Route 29 at I-66 for bridge demolition activities.

I-66 West from Route 28 to Route 29 Centreville
Ramp from I-66 West to Route 29 Centreville
Tuesday, Jan. 21: 9:30 p.m. to 6 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for overhead cantilever sign removal. Additionally, the ramp from I-66 West to Route 29 Centreville will be closed from midnight to 4 a.m. Drivers will be directed prior to the closure to Route 28 South, then follow signs to Route 29 North or South.

Route 28 South from Westfields Boulevard to Braddock Road
Tuesday, Jan. 21: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for overhead cantilever sign removal.

I-66 East from Compton Road to Route 29 Centreville
Wednesday, Jan. 22: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Three lanes will be closed for overhead gantry removal. Drivers should expect periodic 20-minute stoppages between midnight and 4 a.m.

Ramp from Route 29 Centreville South to I-66 East
Thursday, Jan 23: Midnight to 4 a.m.
The ramp will be closed for utility work. Drivers will be directed farther south to Stone Road, make a U-turn onto Route 29 North and follow signs to Route 28 North, then stay to the right and follow signs to I-66 East.

ROUTE 286 (FAIRFAX COUNTY PARKWAY) / FAIR LAKES
Stringfellow Road between Fair Lakes Boulevard and Village Square Drive
Wednesday, Jan. 22, through Friday, Jan. 24: 9 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 24, from 9 p.m. until 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 27
The right lane of southbound Stringfellow Road will be closed for underground utility relocation. The lane will be reopened weekdays between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. to accommodate the evening rush.

ROUTE 50 / FAIRFAX
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

ROUTE 123 (CHAIN BRIDGE ROAD) / OAKTON – CITY OF FAIRFAX
Ramp from I-66 West to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road)
Tuesday, Jan. 21: Midnight to 4 a.m.
The ramp will be closed for utility work. Traffic will be detoured farther west to Route 50 East, stay to the left for I-66 East, then follow signs to Route 123.

ROUTE 243 (NUTLEY STREET) / VIENNA
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

I-495 (CAPITAL BELTWAY) / DUNN LORING
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

Commuter Alternatives
VDOT and the project team have invested in a broad range of programs to help commuters and others stay mobile and safe during construction. Learn more about carpool, vanpool, telework, and commuter bus alternatives.

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Hometown takeover for HGTV

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All are invited on our mission to TAKEOVER Front Royal with positivity, unity and inspiration to drown our streets and social media with uplifting discussions, photos, stories and videos about our 22630!

Our community TAKEOVER could land a literal takeover by HGTV! Watch this video interview to learn more!


The Home and Garden Network is accepting nominations for its largest ever renovation project and a group of community residents believe that Front Royal is the perfect town for the project.

“When I saw the post on Facebook, I was so excited because my kids and I always watch the show together and wish it could be set in Front Royal. This could be the thing that turns the frown upside down and the tragedy into a success story and a come back story,” said Melanie Salins who was inspired to coordinate a meeting on Friday to discuss collaboration for the project.

The deadline to apply is February 7th, and the TAKEOVER committee is hoping that the entire community will join them in making a case for Front Royal to be selected as HGTV’s winning town.

A public brainstorming meeting will be held at the WHAT MATTERS community meeting space, OPEN HOUSE, at 213 E. Main Street (adjacent to the Daily Grind) on Wednesday 1/22 at 7pm to share creative ideas about what to feature in our application video.  We are seeking beautiful photos of our community, video testimonials, historical pictures, and heartwarming stories to include in our submission and on our facebook page “FRONT ROYAL HOME TOWN TAKEOVER.”

Our social media campaign will be led by local social media strategist, Mitchell Smith, who hopes this #FRONTROYALHOMETOWNTAKEOVER campaign of sharing inspiration throughout our community will continue long beyond our application process.

In addition to Smith and Salins, committee members include Letasha Thompson (FR Town Council), William Huck (C&C’s Frozen Treats), Delores Oates (WC Board of Supervisors), Amber Morris and Beth Waller (WHAT MATTERS). Waller added, “This unifying endeavor is exactly what our community needs and I firmly believe that there’s no other town better to win the honor. Let’s put Front Royal on the map, shine a light on our amazing qualities and prove that when we overcome our hardships and thrive together, ANYTHING is possible.”

You are invited to log onto facebook to share your ideas, photos and videos and to submit entries yourself to nominate Front Royal at http://www.hgtvhometowntakeover.com/ .  Feel free to attend the brainstorming meeting in person or virtually on Wednesday (we’ll also be going Facebook Live for the discussion). Join the TAKEOVER!

Visit us on Facebook!

 

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Downtown business, property owners offer Main Street wish list

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A written suggestion (above) for Front Royal’s downtown historic district that received several dots (a.k.a. votes) from business and property owners attending a January 16 town forum. All photos by Kim Riley. Video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

FRONT ROYAL — Historic Front Royal property and business owners on January 16 submitted their suggestions for what Town officials should consider in drafting policies and procedures for events held in specific public spaces in the historic district near and along Main Street.

Their ideas will help inform the Front Royal Town Council’s establishment of policies and procedures for use of the Village Commons area, parades and Main Street events and road closures, said Interim Town Manager Matthew Tederick, who helped lead the Thursday night meeting held at the Warren County Community Center.

“The Town Council for many years has been struggling to find the right policies and procedures for the utilization of the Village Commons area, various events and parking,” Tederick said during his opening remarks at the forum. “Over the last year, there’s been multiple business meetings and I think it’s culminated in this meeting tonight.”

Hopefully, at the end of the three scheduled meetings — the next two being held at the community center on January 30 and February 13, both at 6 p.m. — Tederick said the suggestions submitted by the property and business owners will become part of a draft he submits to the Town Council to consider as it sets policies and procedures for the historic district.

The area has become a hot spot among an array of business and property owners who remain challenged by road closures, parking lot shutdowns and other event-related consequences that have pitted them against one another over the years.

Tederick said he thinks the current framework “is too loose.”

“I’d like to see a better framework and a framework that would get majority buy in and consensus from the business and property owners in the historic district, but also from the citizens,” he said.

Interim Town Manager Matthew Tederick (center) mingled with historic district business & property owners during a January 16 forum held at the Warren County Community Center.

Local author Charles “Chips” Lickson facilitated the meeting, meaning he held court as a so-called forum cop tasked with setting the ground rules, managing the crowd, and keeping the process rolling. Similar formats will be used during the remaining two meetings.

A former practicing lawyer, federal judge’s law clerk, U.S. Army officer, mediator, and adjunct associate professor of political science at Shenandoah University, Lickson told forum attendees that he was hired “to run a tight ship,” which he said basically distinguishes regular meetings from facilitated meetings in that there’s a specific process established for participants to follow.

For instance, historic district property and business owners verbally participated in the Thursday meeting, while historic district residents were invited to submit their comments and contact information to Felicia Hart, the Town’s community development and tourism director.

And Lickson held the audience to the ground rules.

“We are soliciting your ideas with regard to the public spaces in the gazebo area — the historic area — and this includes closures of roads and closures of parking lots,” he said, instructing the property and business owners to not interrupt one another nor attack a speaker for his or her comments.

“This is not the place to make a speech about what your issue is,” said Lickson. “It is a space to make solid suggestions.”

Like Tederick, he called the current Town event process “flexible” and “less cumbersome” compared to some of Front Royal’s neighbors, a few of which charge organizers to hold downtown events to recoup the costs of providing associated town services.

But, Lickson noted, “the truth of the matter is, the Town has got to know what you need.”

Prior to collecting suggestions from the crowd, Tederick said the current process is that an application must be submitted for a special event under a section of chapter 7 of the Town Code, which outlines the related requirements. For example, for a full or partial closing of Main Street, the Town Code says such events may occur two times a month during one calendar year.

Tederick then shared data with forum attendees showing what it cost the Town to provide services during certain events held last year (Graph A); and a comparison of the numbers of events held from 2017 through 2019 in Front Royal’s historic downtown district (Graph B).

For example, he reviewed the total number of Main Street/Chester Street closures during 2017, 2018, and 2019 (top, Graph B) for the number of events held in each year, which totaled 16, 8, and 7, respectively.

“As Town Manager, what’s the right number?” he asked the crowd. “I don’t know what that number is. I’m hoping through this process that we can come up with what the right number is. Should it be 20 (each year)? Should it be five? I’m not here to provide input one way or the other.”

Graph A: The number of larger events held in the historic district of Front Royal during 2019 and the related costs to the Town for providing specific services. Source: Matthew Tederick, Front Royal Interim Town Manager.

Graph B: Comparison of the numbers of events held and related road closures from 2017 through 2019 in Front Royal’s historic downtown district. Source: Matthew Tederick, Front Royal Interim Town Manager.

Meeting organizers then distributed index cards for property and business owners to write down one suggestion per card about what they think is needed in public spaces in the historic downtown. The recollected cards then were tacked up so that each attendee could read the idea and vote only one time on each suggestion using a marker to place a dot or mark on the card. If a person didn’t like the idea written on a card, then no mark needed to be made.

Attendees then lined up at each board and began the voting process for each suggestion, which ran the gamut and included those such as:

 “Keep downtown events free from Town fees;”
 “Eat more ice cream;”
 “Limit Full Main Street Closures to One Per Month;”
 “Notify Main Street businesses when parking lot will be closed 2 days before event;” and
 “Street closures should be less.”

After voting, the forum organizers took down the cards, counted the marks on each, combined similar ideas, and then read the votes for each card having upwards of three votes.

Downtown Front Royal business and property owners lined up to vote on suggestions for Main Street.

The suggestions submitted by historic district property and business owners were varied. More suggestions will be collected during upcoming meetings on January 30 and February 13.

Ultimately, all the suggestions compiled from all of the meetings will be used by Lickson to write a report that he will submit to Tederick, who then will draft recommendations on policies and procedures to submit to the Town Council for possible action.

And the Town Council will be familiar with the process and the suggestions as several of them attended the meeting, including Front Royal Mayor Eugene Tewalt; Vice Mayor Bill Sealock; and Front Royal Town Council members Letasha Thompson and Gary Gillespie.

Some of the process items will be tweaked for the next two meetings, said Lickson, who thought the overall meeting was productive and informative.

Watch the Envisioning Town Commons meeting on this exclusive Royal Examiner video:

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Front Royal Christian School Warriors split games with Fresta Valley Christian School

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Front Royal Christian School Warriors boys and girls basketball teams traveled to Fresta Valley Christian School Thursday, January 16, 2020. FRCS middle school boys defeated Fresta Valley Pioneers 43-17, with Braeden Majors scoring 10 points and George Kassel scoring 9 points. The FRCS middle school girls lost 11-16, with leading scorers being Emma Tutton and Mary Lindsey.

Front Royal Christian School Warriors / Photos courtesy of FRCS

“The boys rallied with good team effort and ball movement, with a lot of hustle” said FRCS Warrior Coach Bear Campbell. “Ethan Frost and Brady Knight led the offense, while Braeden Majors and George Kassel led the defense.” Emma Tutton was identified as the MVP for the girls game by FRCS Warrior Coach Scott Babcock. “Tutton was one of the leading scorers and strongest on rebounds.” Next FRCS middle school games are January 17th, starting at 4:15 p.m at Wakefield Country Day School.

Front Royal Christian School is a Pre-K through 12th-grade school in Front Royal, Virginia, that fosters your student’s innate learning potential. From special needs to gifted, FRCS is committed to the spiritual, moral, and intellectual development of its students and mediates a sense of competence, confidence, and belonging. FRCS provides the 21st-century learner, exceptional and challenging educational experiences, including college preparatory courses with a dual enrollment program with LFCC, performing arts, life skills, and athletics. For more information, call the school at 540-635-6799 or visit www.FrontRoyalChristianSchool.com.

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Skyline High School continues to fight chronic absences

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FRONT ROYAL— With schoolwide chronic absences reaching almost 30 percent last year, the administrators at Skyline High School (SHS) have had to come up with some creative solutions.
One of the most effective practices currently being used at SHS has been an administrator’s knock on the door at the home of a regularly absent student.

“We have gone to several homes of students who don’t want to come to school after we’ve called the parents, who say they just can’t get them there. So I said, ‘Do you mind if I come to your house?’” SHS Principal Michael Smith explained to members of the Warren County School Board during the work session portion of their January 15 regular meeting.

“It’s been pretty effective because the principal is standing there at the front door, almost at their bedroom door, opening it up and asking, ‘Why aren’t you at school?’ The parents get a good kick out of it and it works for the kids; they don’t want us coming back to their house,” said Dr. Smith.

SHS Principal Michael Smith

“Whatever works,” he added. “All of my administrative staff has had to do that, so we’re doing everything we can to get them to school.”

During his presentation to the School Board, Smith said that SHS had an academic review on November 6, 2019. The overall findings and problem identified during the review was that chronic absenteeism at SHS received a Level III performance standing, meaning accredited with conditions, he said.

Melody Sheppard, interim superintendent for Warren County Public Schools (WCPS), told School Board members on Wednesday night that SHS is one of the school district’s two schools dubbed accredited with conditions, and the board next month will hear from Principal Shane Goodwin about similar efforts under way at E. Wilson Morrison Elementary School to curb chronic absenteeism.

Following the academic review, Smith said the subsequent SHS corrective action plan was submitted to the Virginia Department of Education on November 18, 2019, while essential actions to improve the chronic absenteeism rate have been added to the SHS school plan for the 2019-2020 school year.

Additionally, attendance expectations for accurate reporting of attendance were added to the staff handbook; an annual staff training was conducted on the attendance protocol; and attendance data will be reviewed monthly to identify students on track to be chronically absent and to prioritize students requiring Tier 2 and Tier 3 levels of support, he said.

Tier 2 level students are those who have missed nine days at the mid-school year point, while Tier 3 level students are chronically absent from school, said Sheppard, who noted that students are allowed a total of 18 excused absences in a school year.

And according to WCPS attendance policy, absences are excused for a funeral, illness, injury, legal obligations, medical procedures, suspensions, expulsions, religious observances, and military obligations that parents are aware of and support.

In addition to the impromptu at-home visits, Smith said another current practice is to assign teacher mentors to Tier 2 and Tier 3 level students for daily and weekly contact. “It’s usually their first block teacher or another teacher they’re comfortable with,” he said, adding that the goal is for the teacher mentor to get information from the student about why he or she isn’t attending school.

The subsequent data that the teacher mentors put into an online Google form describes when they met with students, what they talked about, and what they determined were some possible solutions. Smith said this data also provides useful evidence for future decision-making around making individualized attendance plans, for example.
Smith outlined several other current practices that are ongoing at SHS to stem the chronic absenteeism problem.

Every Sunday, for instance, Smith sends out a weekly phone blast to relay pre-recorded information about the upcoming week, as well as the importance of regular attendance.

Other practices include what Smith called “simple things,” such as teachers greeting students as they enter the classrooms and administrators greeting students in the morning as they enter the school building. These are county-wide policies aimed at fostering positive relationships across an entire school, he said.

“I actually have two assistant principals at the entrances to the school,” Smith told School Board members. “They open doors and greet every single kid who comes into the school.”

There also has been an attendance committee with parents developed at SHS that already has met twice. “Parents were surprised at the number of students who miss substantial amounts of classroom time,” said Smith.

During the attendance committee meetings that Smith holds with students and their parents, they develop an Attendance Success Plan for each student. He’s so far held 66 meetings.
Second attendance meetings also are held between Smith, the parents, students, and the SHS truancy officer, with 15 having been held thus far. “It’s nothing punitive, it’s just about getting students to realize the importance of what they’re missing when they’re not in the classroom,” said Smith.

Smith also sent out 890 letters to every SHS household asking parents to come in and discuss the chronic absenteeism situation. The parents who did respond to the letter, he said, were the ones whose kids regularly attend school, but who said they wanted to learn how to share the value of coming to school with other families and students.

Additional current practices include a Principal’s Cabinet that consists of class officers who discuss the atmosphere of the school and what incentives might help improve attendance.
During the last meeting, Smith said cabinet members commented that for those students who regularly miss school, they likely wouldn’t attend “no matter what incentive we have.”

The SHS attendance secretary also notifies parents every day to determine why students are absent.

Going forward, Smith told School Board members that SHS will continue to: run the teacher mentor program; meet with students and parents; and send the Sunday phone blasts.

Warren County School Board Vice Chairwoman Catherine Bower asked what the most common reasons are for the chronic absences. Smith said there’s a wide array of excuses.

For instance, many students say they just don’t want to get out of bed or that they’re bored at school, which essentially relates to instruction, said Smith.

Sheppard pointed out that all the current practices at SHS to fight chronic absenteeism are evidence-based practices. “It’s all about building positive relationships with kids,” she said. “Whenever a student comes to school, they have somebody there that they can have a conversation with and not feel uncomfortable.”

“It is about the relationships, the rapport and the trust,” agreed School Board Chairman Arnold Williams Jr., who told Smith to “keep doing what you’re doing. Keep moving forward. I know you can get there.”

“We will,” Smith told him, noting that last year, SHS was at 29 percent chronic absenteeism and this year’s goal is to reduce that mark to 24 percent. “If we can get there, that would be a huge decrease.”

Watch the latest Warren County School Board work session where SHS Principal Michael Smith discusses this problem with the board:

Chronic absenteeism impacts accreditation at Skyline High School

Warren County School Board hires superintendent search firm

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Front Royal Christian School Lady Warriors score high

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Front Royal Christian High School Lady Warriors hosted Eukarya Christian Academy Lions in girls high school basketball. The final score was 63-10, with leading scorer Nichole Hillaert at 20 points, an all-time career high for Hillaert. Emma Tutton surpassed her record on rebounds. This brings the Lady Warrior season record of 3 wins and 1 loss. Additional scorers were seniors Baily Coughenour with 12 points and Hannah Johnson with 8 points. Senior Hannah Fletcher scored 7 points and freshman Audrey Moya scored 8 points. Next FRCS Varsity Girls home game is January 29th at 4:30 p.m. The Lady warriors will face off against Virginia Academy.

Front Royal Christian School is a Pre-K through 12th-grade school in Front Royal, Virginia, that fosters your student’s innate learning potential. From special needs to gifted, FRCS is committed to the spiritual, moral, and intellectual development of its students and mediates a sense of competence, confidence, and belonging. FRCS provides the 21st-century learner, exceptional and challenging educational experiences, including college preparatory courses with a dual enrollment program with LFCC, performing arts, life skills, and athletics. For more information, call the school at 540-635-6799 or visit www.FrontRoyalChristianSchool.com.

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
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Upcoming Events

Jan
20
Mon
9:00 am Martin Luther King Prayer Breakfast @ Esbie Baptist Church
Martin Luther King Prayer Breakfast @ Esbie Baptist Church
Jan 20 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am
Martin Luther King Prayer Breakfast @ Esbie Baptist Church
Monday, January 20, 2020, starting at 9:00am, Esbie Baptist Church will be having their annual MLK Prayer Breakfast. The speaker of the hour will be Rev. Dr. Donald Reid, Pastor of Mt. Parah Baptist Church[...]
Jan
21
Tue
2:30 pm Inspiring speaker Rodney Smith t... @ Boggs Chapel at Randolph-Macon Academy
Inspiring speaker Rodney Smith t... @ Boggs Chapel at Randolph-Macon Academy
Jan 21 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Inspiring speaker Rodney Smith to visit R-MA @ Boggs Chapel at Randolph-Macon Academy
On Tuesday, January 21st, at 2:30 pm, in Boggs Chapel at Randolph-Macon Academy (R-MA), the public is invited to be inspired by Rodney Smith, a man who has chosen to make a difference in the[...]
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 21 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, January 7 – Based on books about Balto, we will learn more about service dogs this week. For ages[...]
Jan
22
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 22 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, December 18 and Thursday, December 19: Something we all enjoy this time of year is giving and receiving gifts. Our stories, songs, and craft will[...]
Jan
23
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 23 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, December 18 and Thursday, December 19: Something we all enjoy this time of year is giving and receiving gifts. Our stories, songs, and craft will[...]
Jan
24
Fri
9:00 am Veterans Services Meeting at Abl... @ Able Forces
Veterans Services Meeting at Abl... @ Able Forces
Jan 24 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Veterans Services Meeting at Able Forces @ Able Forces
Able Forces Foundation will once again be hosting a visit by Andre Miller, Resource Specialist, Virginia Veteran and Family Support, Department of Veteran Services, Commonwealth of Virginia, and Danielle Cullers, Homeless Veteran Advocate-Volunteers of America[...]
Jan
25
Sat
11:00 am Goldilocks and the Three Bears @ Samuels Public Library
Goldilocks and the Three Bears @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 25 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Goldilocks and the Three Bears @ Samuels Public Library
A Story Ballet. Join us in a celebration of classic literature through dance! The whole family will enjoy this ballet performance, presented by the Northern Virginia Academy of Ballet.
2:00 pm Aspiring Artists @ Samuels Public Library
Aspiring Artists @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 25 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Aspiring Artists @ Samuels Public Library
Are you aged 7 or older? Do you enjoy art? If so, please join us for our children’s art class. Using the classic scissor cutting art of Scherenschnitte, we will make silhouettes in a nature[...]
Jan
28
Tue
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 28 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, January 7 – Based on books about Balto, we will learn more about service dogs this week. For ages[...]
Jan
29
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 29 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, December 18 and Thursday, December 19: Something we all enjoy this time of year is giving and receiving gifts. Our stories, songs, and craft will[...]