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Interesting Things You Need to Know

Who shares your birthday in August?

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Happy Birthday! See who shares your birthday this month.

1. Robert Cray, 65, singer, guitarist, Columbus, GA, 1953.
2. David Ferrer, 36, tennis player, Javea, Spain, 1982.
3. Martha Stewart, 77, lifestyle guru,Nutley, NJ, 1941.

4. Greta Gerwig, 35, actress, Sacramento, CA, 1983.
5. Loni Anderson, 72, actress (WKRP in Cincinnati), St. Paul, MN, 1946.
6. David Robinson, 53, Hall of Fame basketball player, Key West, FL, 1965.
7. Garrison Keillor, 76, humorist (A Prairie Home Companion), Anoka, MN, 1942.
8. Mel Tillis, 86, singer, Pahokee, FL, 1932.
9. Anna Kendrick, 33, actress, Portland, ME, 1985.
10. Angie Harmon, 46, actress (Law & Order), Dallas, TX, 1972.
11. David Brooks, 57, journalist, Toronto, ON, Canada, 1961.
12. Cara Delevingne, 26, actress, London, England, 1992.
13. Kathleen Battle, 70, opera singer, Portsmouth, OH, 1948.
14. Halle Berry, 50, actress (X-Men), Cleveland, OH, 1968.
15. Jennifer Lawrence, 28, actress, Louisville, KY, 1990.
16. Madonna, 60, singer, born Madonna Louise Veronica Ciccone, Bay City, MI, 1958.
17. Julian Fellowes, 69, producer, (Downton Abbey), Cairo, Egypt, 1949.
18. Malcolm-Jamal Warner, 48, actor (The Cosby Show), Jersey City, NJ, 1970.
19. Diana Muldaur, 80, actress (Star Trek: The Next Generation), New York, NY, 1938.
20. Al Roker, 64, television personality (The Today Show), Brooklyn, NY, 1954.
21. Usain Bolt, 32, Olympic track athlete, Trelawny, Jamaica, 1986.
22. Tori Amos, 55, musician, Newton, NC, 1963.
23. Barbara Eden , 84, actress (I Dream of Jeannie), Barbara Huffman, Tucson, AZ, 1934.
24. Marlee Matlin , 53, actress (Oscar for Children of a Lesser God), Morton Grove, IL, 1965.
25. Blake Lively, 31, actress, Tarzana, CA, 1987.
26. Melissa McCarthy, 48, actress (Spy), Plainfield, IL, 1970.
27. Patrick J. Adams, 37, actor, Toronto, ON, Canada, 1981.
28. Quvenzhané Wallis, 15, actress (Annie, Beasts of the Southern Wild), Houma, LA, 2003.
29. Liam Payne, 25, singer (One Direction), Wolverhampton, England, 1993.
30. Cameron Diaz, 46, actress, San Diego, CA, 1972.
31. Chris Tucker, 46, actor, Decatur, GA, 1972.

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A history of roads in Virginia: “The Most Convenient Wayes”

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Early colonists considered waterways to be the most important transportation links.

The Virginia settlers, who arrived at Jamestown Island aboard three small ships on May 13, 1607, had little need for a road system. Barely more than 100 in number, their first concerns were disease, hunger, shelter, and protection from the often hostile Indians who had lived on the land for generations. In those first rigorous years, survival demanded the full energy of the colonists in the wilderness. The waterways were there for transportation—the great rivers that emptied into the Chesapeake Bay and that were to become known as the James, the York, the Rappahannock, and the Potomac.

As the colonists hunted for food and cautiously began exploring the forest, they discovered a crude network of paths made long before by Indians and wild animals. The colonists used these, and many of the paths were to shape the Virginia road pattern for years to come.

The settlers also found roughly built bridges made of tree trunks and limbs, which they at first believed to be Indian-planted traps rather than bridges. By 1610, with new arrivals from England, the colony numbered 210. The road along the River Bank, probably a former Indian path, was used to haul supplies from the ships to the Jamestown Fort.

The Greate Road appears to have been Jamestown’s main street, and it was of early commercial importance. It crossed the isthmus connecting the island with the mainland at Glass House Point, where in 1608 glass was manufactured for export. Faint traces of the road are evident today at Glass House Point.

Eventually, the Greate Road extended on the mainland to Middle Plantation, a settlement to become known as Williamsburg and destined to be the capital of the Virginia colony and the hub of the colonial road system.

The first bridge recorded as having been built by the English settlers was constructed in 1611 at Jamestown Island. It wasn’t really a bridge, but a wharf about 200 feet long from the bank of the James to the river channel, where the settlers docked their ships. The colony’s first agricultural crops raised for export were rolled to these ships.

John Rolfe had begun experimenting with the cultivation of tobacco in 1612 and two years later exported a shipment to England. In less than 20 years, tobacco exports had reached 500,000 pounds annually; tobacco would remain the foundation for the Virginia economy throughout the colonial period. Inevitably, the success of the tobacco crop was to influence the colony’s transportation needs as well.

The tobacco fields spread on the mainland, and a number of the old Indian paths became tobacco rolling roads. The name came from the practice of packing the harvested tobacco in barrels called hogsheads and rolling them to the wharves, frequently a distance of miles. The rollers ordinarily tried to follow the high ground and avoid the fords, or shallow stream crossings, because water leaking through the barrels would damage the tobacco.

The practice of following the old paths and branching off from time to time on higher ground accounts for many of the early meandering country roads. After two decades, the colony’s population was near 5,000 and growing. The frontier had been pushed well beyond its original boundaries, and while much of the settlers’ travel was still by boat, an increasing proportion was on land.

Next up: America’s First Road Law

Produced by the
Virginia Department of Transportation
Office of Public Affairs
1401 E. Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23219
VirginiaDOT.org

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Truckers and the transport industry: the backbone of America

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Trucking is the most common method of transport in America and is responsible for moving 70 percent of all freight within the country. There are currently just under four million long-haul truckers employed in the United States.

Truck drivers have a rigorous schedule and spend up to 300 days per year on the road. Many work up to 70 hours a week, although they’re only allowed to drive for 11 hours a day.

Some truckers are paid hourly, but most are paid by the number of miles driven. This means that traffic, adverse weather conditions and mechanical breakdowns all have a financial cost for truck drivers.

Drivers travel roughly 125,000 miles per year, which amounts to almost 350 miles per day. When it comes to schedules and seeing their families, drivers with seniority may have a regional route that allows them to return home weekly. Newer drivers, however, may be away from home for up to three weeks.

Truck drivers and other transport workers do important work that keeps our communities running. About 75 percent of American communities are entirely reliant on trucks for transporting food, clothes and supplies. So, the next time you see a trucker, thank them for the important role they play in keeping our country running smoothly.

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How often should you cut your hair?

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The ideal frequency with which you should cut your hair depends on its length, the chemical processes it’s been through and whether or not you’re growing it out.

Structured styles like pixies and bobs need to be cut every four to six weeks to maintain their shape. Medium to long hair that’s in good condition can be trimmed every 12 weeks.

If you’re growing your hair, have it trimmed every eight weeks. While this may seem counter-intuitive, frequent cutting keeps your hair strong and prevents it from breaking.

Hair that’s been dyed, heat damaged or undergone other chemical processes should be cut often to restore it to health. If your ends are dry or broken, get a trim every six to eight weeks until the damage has been removed.

Keep in mind that everyone’s hair grows at a different rate. You may find that your own strands need a trim sooner than is suggested here. Talk to your stylist to determine the right haircut frequency for your particular strands.

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Bike tours: discovering the city by bicycle

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Bike tours are an increasingly popular alternative to more traditional types of sightseeing excursions like bus and walking tours. Whether you want to explore your own town or a foreign metropolis, cycling tours are a great way to discover a city.

See all the best sights
Most cities are bike-friendly and getting around them on two wheels is reasonably safe and straightforward. Plus, you’ll avoid getting stuck in traffic and be able to log more miles than you would if you set out on foot.

On a bike tour, accessing all the best a town has to offer is easy. Many restaurants, museums, theaters and shops provide secure lock-up facilities for bicycles. Additionally, you can visit off-the-beaten-track gems that buses can’t access such as parks, alleyways and outdoor markets.

A healthy way to get around
Cycling is a great way to exercise and has many health benefits. What’s more, biking can be adapted to a range of fitness levels, so regardless of your current health status, you’re likely to find a bike tour suited to your needs and capacity.

Biking is also a great way to burn calories — no need to feel guilty about chowing down on the local cuisine!

Additionally, engaging in physical activity helps to curb jet lag, so hopping on a bike is a great way to start a vacation in another time zone.

Types of tours
If you’re ready to explore the city by bicycle, then the next step is to decide which type of bike tour is right for you.

• Guided bike tours. If you’d like to have an expert guide show you around, you can schedule a trip with a bike tour company.

• Self-guided bike tours. If you’re looking for more independence, opt for a self-guided tour. You’ll ride on your own but with an itinerary created by someone else. Sometimes these can be downloaded online.

• DIY bike tours. If you’re keen on blazing your own trail, you can create your own itinerary. Unless you’re familiar with the city, research will be required.

Whichever type of tour you choose, discovering the city by bicycle is bound to be a memorable experience.

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Lifejackets versus personal flotation devices: is there a difference?

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Summer is the perfect time to enjoy our country’s beautiful lakes and waterways. But when boarding a boat, stepping into a canoe or doing any other activity in the water, safety needs to be at the forefront of your mind.

National Safe Boating Week aims to spread this message. In particular, one of the central objectives of the campaign is to publicize the importance of wearing a properly fitted and fastened lifejacket or personal flotation device (PFD) when on the water.

Though both lifejackets and PFDs make their wearers more buoyant, the devices fit and function differently. Before choosing which one to wear on the water, you need to assess which is more suitable.

Lifejackets

Lifejackets are more buoyant than PFDs, with the bulk of the buoyancy located in the front part of the vest.

If an unconscious person wearing a lifejacket lies facedown in the water, he or she will be rotated so that they face upwards.

Lifejackets come in two standard sizes, one for children (or people under 90 pounds) and one for adults. They’re generally the best option for young children and weak swimmers.

Personal flotation devices
A PFD is less buoyant than a lifejacket, and the bulk of the buoyancy is placed at the back of the vest.

PFDs are more comfortable and allow for greater mobility than lifejackets (making them ideal for water sports). However, in certain contexts, they’re not as safe — PFDs are designed to keep a conscious person afloat only in calm conditions. A person should therefore feel confident in the water before opting for a PFD in place of a lifejacket.

Wearing a lifejacket or PFD when you’re on the water is hugely important. But it’s only one part of boating safety. For more information on how to stay safe on the water, visit safeboatingcampaign.com.

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Using the internet: top tips to get you started

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Do you know how to use the internet? Accessing the digital world allows you read up on current events, connect with friends and family members, play games, watch videos, pay bills and shop from the comfort of your own home. As a senior, you have a lot to gain by being internet-savvy. If you’re keen to get started, here are some tips that will help.

1. Consider a tablet
Research shows that seniors find tablets easier to use than computers, as touch-screens are simpler to navigate. While typing on a touch-screen can be tedious, you can purchase an external keyboard to make writing easier.

2. Customize your settings

There are a number of adjustments you can make on your device to simplify your online experience. Consider using a high-resolution screen or increasing the size of the text and menu buttons. When you buy a new tablet or computer, get a technician to customize it to your needs and preferences.

3. Use passwords wisely
Use sufficiently complex passwords that include at least one number and one symbol. Also, be sure to use different passwords for different sites. By doing these things, you’ll keep your information secure. Write down all your passwords and keep them some¬where out of sight.

4. Use educational resources
There are a number of ways to learn about using the internet. You can sign up for local classes in your community, borrow or buy books on the subject or consult educational materials online. One great resource is provided via the Goodwill Community Foundation at gcfllearnfree.org. However, there are countless other online learning materials available, including an array of instructional videos found on youtube.com.

One last tip: be patient with yourself. Learning a new skill takes time and practice, but if you persevere, you will succeed.

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Upcoming Events

Jun
17
Mon
10:00 am Design a chair for the SPCA CHAI... @ SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
Design a chair for the SPCA CHAI... @ SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
Jun 17 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Design a chair for the SPCA CHAIR-ity Brunch @ SPCA of Winchester, Frederick, and Clarke Counties
Calling all artists!! Design a chair for the SPCA CHAIR-ity Brunch and save homeless animals. Pick up a chair from the SPCA Thrift Shop, build a chair, up-cycle a chair, paint a chair, or upholster[...]
10:00 am Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Jun 17 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Summer Art Week - Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week for children is designed for students who love art and want to go beyond what they have experienced in the school setting, while meeting the Virginia Standards of Art. Recommended ages for[...]
Jun
18
Tue
10:00 am Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Jun 18 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Summer Art Week - Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week for children is designed for students who love art and want to go beyond what they have experienced in the school setting, while meeting the Virginia Standards of Art. Recommended ages for[...]
Jun
19
Wed
10:00 am Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Jun 19 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Summer Art Week - Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week for children is designed for students who love art and want to go beyond what they have experienced in the school setting, while meeting the Virginia Standards of Art. Recommended ages for[...]
Jun
20
Thu
10:00 am Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Jun 20 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Summer Art Week - Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week for children is designed for students who love art and want to go beyond what they have experienced in the school setting, while meeting the Virginia Standards of Art. Recommended ages for[...]
5:00 pm Annual Wine Pull @ Blue Wing Frog
Annual Wine Pull @ Blue Wing Frog
Jun 20 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Annual Wine Pull @ Blue Wing Frog
5th Annual Wine Pull | Thursday June 20, 2019 | 5:00 – 7:00pm | Blue Wing Frog, 219 Chester Street. Tickets: $40.00 – Includes food, glass of wine, and a bottle of wine or wine[...]
Jun
21
Fri
10:00 am Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week – Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Jun 21 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Summer Art Week - Session 1 @ Art in the Valley
Summer Art Week for children is designed for students who love art and want to go beyond what they have experienced in the school setting, while meeting the Virginia Standards of Art. Recommended ages for[...]
Jun
22
Sat
9:30 am Acrylic Pour Workshop – Level 1 @ Art in the Valley
Acrylic Pour Workshop – Level 1 @ Art in the Valley
Jun 22 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm
Acrylic Pour Workshop - Level 1 @ Art in the Valley
Learn the process and art of acrylic pouring with artist and instructor Jan Settle. You’ll have a fun & exciting experience creating your own original masterpieces in this workshop! Learn how to manipulate paint &[...]
1:00 pm Meet the Author: NP Haley @ Royal Oak Bookshop
Meet the Author: NP Haley @ Royal Oak Bookshop
Jun 22 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Meet the Author: NP Haley @ Royal Oak Bookshop
Lily and the Ghost of Michael Thorne By local author, NP Haley Feeling someone or something looking at her, Lily peered into the shrouded forest and buildings surrounding the alley. Blinking rapidly to make sure[...]
7:30 pm Middle School Pool Party @ Claude A. Stokes Community Swimming Pool
Middle School Pool Party @ Claude A. Stokes Community Swimming Pool
Jun 22 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Middle School Pool Party @ Claude A. Stokes Community Swimming Pool
Middle School Pool Party! FREE to all Warren County students who will be in the 6th-8th grades for the 2019-2020 school year. Event will take place at Claude A. Stokes Community Swimming Pool on June[...]