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AG Mark Herring opposes Texas’ effort to invalidate 2020 election results

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On December 10, 2020, Attorney General Mark R. Herring has joined a coalition of 23 attorneys general in urging the Supreme Court to reject the Texas Attorney General’s request that the Court overturn election results in four key states critical to President-Elect Joe Biden’s victory. In an amicus brief filed in Texas v. Pennsylvania, Attorney General Herring and his colleagues argue that Texas’ unprecedented suit depends on a misreading of the Constitution’s Electors Clause – one that clashes with a century of precedent denies states’ power to make their own decisions about election administration and oversight and threatens to upend the basic notions of federalism and states’ rights. Further, Texas’ suit depends on baseless claims of voter fraud, offering no evidence whatsoever of systemic fraud in the November election. Attorney General Herring and his colleagues are asking the Court to throw out Texas’ lawsuit against Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

“This anti-democratic, un-American lawsuit has no basis or support in the law, the Constitution, or reality. It attempts to undermine centuries of election precedent, disenfranchise millions of Americans, and circumvent the will of the people in an attempt to overturn an election that did not come out in Donald Trump’s favor,” said Attorney General Herring. “There is absolutely no evidence of any kind of widespread voter fraud in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Michigan or Wisconsin, yet these baseless and fabricated conspiracy theories are now being dragged from the dark corners of the internet into courtrooms in order to undermine the free and fair elections that form the very foundation of our democracy. President Trump has already lost more than 50 times in court in his futile attempts to overturn the election results and my colleagues and I plan to add to that total by helping to defeat this lawsuit.”

According to President Trump’s own Department of Homeland Security, the 2020 election was “the most secure in American history.” President-Elect Biden carried the states of Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin by decisive margins. Both Wisconsin and Georgia underwent recounts to confirm the results. Wisconsin’s recount revealed President-Elect Biden had won by a slightly larger margin of victory than in the initial count. All three recounts in Georgia have reaffirmed President-elect Biden’s edge. Election officials in all 50 states and the District of Columbia have now certified their results. While President Trump’s campaign has made wild allegations of electoral tampering, neither the campaign nor its supporters have produced any evidence of substantial voter fraud or other forms of wrongdoing. The president and his allies have filed 55 election-related suits since November 3 and judges have rejected their claims in all but one minor case.

Despite this, the Texas attorney general, supported by 17 Republican attorneys general, filed a lawsuit against Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin in the Supreme Court. The lawsuit alleges that the States unlawfully enacted changes to their election laws under the cover of the COVID-19 pandemic. It asks the Supreme Court to make an unprecedented intervention and invalidate the will of the voters in those four states. Tellingly, it says nothing of other states—including Texas and several other States that supported Texas’s lawsuit—that made similar changes to their election process to guarantee access to the ballot while keeping residents safe during this public health emergency.


Attorney General Herring and his colleagues filed an amicus brief today in vigorous opposition to Texas’s undemocratic effort to overturn the results of the election. Specifically, the states urge the Supreme Court to deny Texas’s lawsuit because:

• Texas’s interpretation of the Electors Clause is contrary to a century’s worth of precedent: The Electors Clause of the Constitution grants the states the power to set their own rules for presidential elections held within their own states. While the text of the Constitution says this authority is given to “state legislatures,” since the early 20th century, the Supreme Court has allowed the legislatures to delegate this authority to elections administrators or other state government entities.

• States have a constitutional right to determine the process for administering their own elections: Federalism is a core component of the Constitution, governing a division of power between the states and the federal government. The Constitution makes clear, and the Court has affirmed, that the Framers granted the States the right to administer and oversee presidential elections on their own. Yet Texas’s lawsuit—calling on the Supreme Court to intervene in the elections held by the four defendant states—would infringe on that right, and thus, their sovereignty. Further, it would set its own destructive precedent limiting the States’ ability to make critical changes to the structure and oversight of elections.

• There is no evidence that the states’ common-sense measures to protect the vote and the health of residents produced significant voter fraud: Since 2000, more than 250 million people in all 50 states have voted using mail-in ballots, and in 2018 alone, more than 31 million Americans—or about 25.8 percent of voters—cast their ballots by mail. Moreover, five states—Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Utah, and Washington—already have all-mail voting systems where every registered voter receives a ballot in the mail. Despite the prevalence of voting by mail, officials at the state and federal level have consistently found no evidence of widespread fraud. That remained true for the 2020 election. Despite President Trump’s claims that the results were tainted by voting fraud, his campaign lawyers and other allies have consistently failed to substantiate these assertions with any evidence. Indeed, Republican and Democratic officials overseeing the elections in all four defendant states have repeatedly confirmed that these processes were safe and secure.

Joining Attorney General Herring in filing today’s amicus brief are the attorneys general of California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Guam, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, U.S. Virgin Islands, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

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New information technology and cybersecurity legislation goes into effect in Virginia on July 1, 2022

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RICHMOND – Starting today, July 1, 2022, new state laws take effect that impact information technology (IT) and cybersecurity in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The first piece of legislation expands the requirements for public bodies when it comes to reporting cybersecurity incidents. As of July 1, every state and local public body must report to the Virginia Fusion Intelligence Center all incidents that:

• Threaten the security of the Commonwealth’s data or communications;
• Result in the exposure of data protected by federal or state laws; or
• Compromise the security of the public entity or agency’s IT systems with the potential to cause major disruption to normal activities.

These reports must be made within 24 hours of discovering an incident.

Additionally, the legislation requires the Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the Commonwealth to convene a workgroup of state and local stakeholders. The workgroup, which started meeting in May, is reviewing current cybersecurity reporting and information-sharing practices and will make recommendations on best practices regarding such reports.


“Cybersecurity is a priority of critical importance for the Commonwealth of Virginia, as is focused coordination of government of all levels and entities,” said Deputy Secretary of Cybersecurity of the Commonwealth Aliscia Andrews. “The implementation of this legislation provides a golden opportunity for us to connect, learn about our collective strengths, and be ready to respond.”

“Last year, we reported over 66 million cyberattack attempts on our systems in the Commonwealth. That’s a rate of 2.12 attacks every second,” said CIO of the Commonwealth Robert Osmond. “When we see the intensity and sophistication with which cyber attackers are carrying out these threats, we know that we need every resource available to strengthen our cybersecurity infrastructure. VITA looks forward to collaborating with our partners to help keep all our systems, ways of conducting business, and, ultimately, our services and our people, safe.”

The second piece of legislation transforms the Information Technology Advisory Council (ITAC) into a body with members from the private sector as well as legislators, increases the number of council members, and adds cybersecurity to the ITAC’s advisory area. Member appointments to the new ITAC should be completed soon, and the council is expected to begin meeting later this year.

For more information about VITA and its mission, visit VITA’s website.

The Virginia IT Agency proudly serves the Commonwealth’s 65 executive branch agencies, a workforce of 55,000 state employees, and 8.6 million Virginians. VITA connects Virginians to critical government services through information and innovation technology, infrastructure, cybersecurity, and governance.

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New law allows DMV to grant extended license validity to military and others

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Effective July 1, 2022, certain license holders are able to apply with the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) for driver’s license extensions of up to six years for military and foreign service members serving outside of Virginia and government contractors working outside the United States; and up to two years for those showing good cause for extensions. Prior to July 1, those extensions were valid for up to three years and one year, respectively.

“We understand the challenges faced by our military, foreign service, and government contractor customers with deployments and assignments keeping them on the move,” said Acting DMV Commissioner Linda Ford. “Similarly, we know that things like long-term medical treatment or caring for a loved one in another state can create hardships for any of us. We’re pleased to be able to work with customers in these situations to further extend driver’s licenses, giving them one less thing to worry about.”

The change stems from HB 540, introduced by Delegate Danica Roem (D–Prince William), passed by the General Assembly during the 2022 session, and signed into law by Governor Glenn Youngkin.

In all cases, customers need to complete an application process and provide supporting documentation in order to qualify for a driver’s license extension. Currently, extended customers can apply for the newly enacted extensions, up to the six and two-year limits, via the same application process they originally followed.


More information, including complete application instructions, is available at:

https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/general/#outsideva/military.asp (for military members)

https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/general/#outsideva/diplomat.asp (for diplomats)

https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/general/#outsideva/contractors.asp (for government contractors).

Customers who need information on hardship extensions may visit www.dmvNOW.com and click Contact Us.

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State News

Governor Glenn Youngkin issues Executive Order reforming Virginia’s regulatory process

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Richmond, VA – On June 30, 2022, Governor Youngkin signed Executive Order #19 establishing the Office of Regulatory Management within the Office of the Governor to provide transparency, streamline regulatory management, and fulfill Governor Youngkin’s commitment to reduce 25% of Virginia’s regulatory burdens.

“Last year, I pledged to Virginians that we would remove 25% of the regulatory requirements in the Commonwealth. In the spirit of this objective, we have created the Office of Regulatory Management, led by Andrew Wheeler, which will create much-needed transparency and efficiency in Virginia’s regulatory process to ensure that we have a government that works for the citizens of the Commonwealth,” said Governor Youngkin.

The Office of Regulatory Management (ORM) will streamline regulatory activities across the executive branch and manage cross-departmental functions such as regulations, permits, and grants. The ORM will review all agency regulations and initiate the “Unified Regulatory Plan” by which all agencies will annually publish a publicly available list of all expected regulations for the upcoming year. This Executive Order also calls for tracking new regulatory requirements for each new effective regulation and reviewing all existing regulations every four years.

This Executive Order enhances transparency by requiring the posting of all proposed regulations on Virginia’s Regulatory Town Hall website. The new regulatory review process will require agencies to conduct cost-benefit and other analyses of their proposed regulations to ensure they are not overly burdensome on other public bodies or private citizens.


 

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Celebrate smart, safe & sober this July 4th holiday weekend

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Independence Day traditions include backyard barbecues, festivals, family gatherings, and fireworks. To keep all those living, working, visiting, and traveling through Virginia safe during the extended holiday weekend, the Virginia State Police is encouraging Virginians to play it smart and plan ahead to ensure everyone on the road is safe and sober.

“Summer days are filled with celebrations, vacations, outdoor festivals, and backyard cookouts, but no matter where your plans take you, please make safety your priority,” said Colonel Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “With fatal traffic crashes on pace this year to mimic last year’s record number, I urge all Virginians to buckle up, eliminate distractions and never drive buzzed, drunk, or under the influence. Together we can make this Independence Day the safest on record!”

If planning to drink alcohol at a July 4 function, plan ahead and arrange a designated driver, use a rideshare service or taxi, or utilize public transportation to be certain you get home safely. Party hosts are encouraged to serve non-alcoholic beverage options, and to help prevent any guests from drinking and driving home from their event.

As part of its ongoing efforts to increase safety and reduce traffic fatalities on Virginia’s highways during the coming holiday weekend, Virginia State Police will increase patrols from 12:01 am Friday (July 1, 2022) through midnight Monday (July 4, 2022) as part of the Operation Crash Awareness Reduction Effort (C.A.R.E.). Operation C.A.R.E. is a state-sponsored, national program intended to reduce crashes, fatalities, and injuries due to impaired driving, speed, and failing to wear a seat belt.


During last year’s four-day Independence Day Operation C.A.R.E initiative, there were 12 traffic deaths on Virginia highways. Virginia troopers arrested 61 drivers operating under the influence of alcohol or drugs, cited 4,025 speeders and 1,434 reckless drivers, and issued 510 citations to individuals for failing to obey the law and buckle up. Troopers also assisted 1,550 disabled/stranded motorists.

With increased holiday patrols, Virginia State Police also reminds drivers of Virginia’s “Move Over” law, which requires motorists to move over when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped alongside the road. If unable to move over, then drivers are required to cautiously pass the emergency vehicle. The law also applies to workers in vehicles equipped with amber lights.

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DMV reminds Virginians to make a plan before celebrating this Fourth of July

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The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) reminds Virginians to celebrate responsibly and designate a sober driver before the Fourth of July festivities begin.

Last year, during the Fourth of July holiday period (July 2-July 5, 2021) there were 105 crashes, 56 injuries, and two deaths related to alcohol on the Commonwealth’s roads.

“Preventing an alcohol-related tragedy is simple – do not drive after drinking any alcohol, period,” said Acting DMV Commissioner Linda Ford, the Governor’s Highway Safety Representative. “Even one drink can impair judgment on the road. And if your holiday celebrations involve alcohol, be sure to designate a sober driver before the party begins to ensure a safe ride home.”

Celebrate this Fourth of July weekend responsibly:


  • If you are planning to drink at an event, plan a safe ride home before even arriving.
  • If someone you know has been drinking, do not let that person get behind the wheel.
  • If you do decide to drink, do not drive for any reason. Arrange a ride from a sober friend, a taxi, or a ride-sharing service.
  • If you are serving alcohol at your party, make sure all guests leave with a sober driver.
  • Everyone in the vehicle should be wearing a seat belt – it’s your best defense against impaired drivers.
  • Slow down and if you see an impaired driver on the road, contact law enforcement – your actions could save a life.

 

 

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Crime/Court

Virginia’s annual crime analysis report now available on Virginia State Police website

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Virginia’s official and only comprehensive report on local and statewide crime figures for 2021, titled Crime in Virginia, is now available online at the Virginia State Police website on the VSP CJIS Data Analysis & Reporting Team page. Crime in Virginia continues to provide precise rates and occurrences of crimes committed in towns, cities and counties across the Commonwealth. The report breaks down criminal offenses and arrests by reporting agency.

Violent crime includes the offenses of murder, forcible sex offenses (rape, sodomy and sexual assault with an object per the FBI’s updated rape definition), robbery and aggravated assault. Overall, the violent crime rate increased in 2021 to 194.4 (per 100,000 population) from 183.0 in 2020.  There were 16,823 violent crime offenses reported in 2021 compared to 15,713 violent crime offenses reported in 2020, representing a 7.1% increase.

The following 2021 crime figures in Virginia are presented in the report:

  • The number of reported homicides increased from 528 to 562 (6.4%).  The murder/non-negligent manslaughter rate increased from 6.15 in 2020 to 6.49 in 2021 (per 100,000 population).  Victims and offenders tended to be younger males; 38.6% of homicide victims were men between 18 and 34 and 55.7% of known offenders were men between 18 and 34.  Nearly half (47.5%) of all homicides occurred at a residence/home.
  • Motor vehicle thefts and attempted thefts increased 3.8% compared to 2020. During 2021, there were 11,638 motor vehicles reported stolen in 11,249 offenses. In 2021, 7,589 motor vehicles were recovered (vehicles may have been stolen prior to 2021).  Of all motor vehicles stolen, 35.4% were taken from the residence/home.  The reported value of all motor vehicles stolen was $131,738,135.
  • Drug arrests decreased by nearly half (46.7%) with the largest percentage decrease in arrestees under age 25 (67.6%).  The number of reports of drugs seized decreased for nearly all drug types, especially marijuana (67%), due in part to decriminalization of possessing less than 1 ounce of the drug effective July 1, 2020 and Code of Virginia §18.2-250.1 being repealed July 1, 2021.
  • Burglary decreased by 8.3% between 2020 and 2021. In fact, burglaries and attempted burglaries have steadily declined over the past ten years. In 2021, there were 10,464 burglaries and attempted burglaries whereas in 2011 there were 27,872, representing a decreased burglary rate in the last decade from 344.24 to 120.89 per 100,000 population.
  • Fraud offenses increased 8.4% compared to 2020. Nearly 80% of victims (79.9%) were individuals while 11.3% were businesses. Nearly a quarter (23.2%) of fraud victims were over the age 65.
  • Of the known weapons reported for violent crimes, firearms were used in 82.1% of homicides and 48.6% of robberies. Firearms were used in more than one-third (38.7%) of aggravated assault cases.
  • There were 123 hate crime offenses, involving 106 victims, reported in 2021.  This represents a 35.3% decrease compared to 2020. Most hate crimes (69.8%) were racially or ethnically motivated. Bias toward sexual orientation and religion were next highest (19.0%, 8.7%, respectively). Of all reported bias motivated crimes, 75.6% were assault offenses (aggravated assault, simple assault) or destruction/damage/vandalism of property.

The report employs an Incident Based Reporting (IBR) method for calculating offenses, thus allowing for greater accuracy. IBR divides crimes into two categories: Group A for serious offenses including violent crimes (murder, forcible sex offenses, robbery and aggravated assault), property crimes and drug offenses, and Group B for what are considered less serious offenses such as trespassing, disorderly conduct, and liquor law violations where an arrest has occurred.


Per state mandate, the Department of Virginia State Police serves as the primary collector of crime data from participating Virginia state and local police departments and sheriff’s offices. The data are collected by the Virginia State Police Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division via a secured internet system. This information is then compiled into Crime in Virginia, an annual report for use by law enforcement, elected officials, media and the general public. These data become the official crime statistics for the Commonwealth and are sent to the FBI for incorporation into their annual report, Crime in the United States.

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Thank You to our Local Business Participants:

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Aders Insurance Agency, Inc (State Farm)

Aire Serv Heating and Air Conditioning

Apple Dumpling Learning Center

Apple House

Auto Care Clinic

Beaver Tree Services

Blake and Co. Hair Spa

Blue Ridge Arts Council

Blue Ridge Education

BNI Shenandoah Valley

C&C's Ice Cream Shop

Christine Binnix - McEnearney Associates

Code Ninjas Front Royal

Cool Techs Heating and Air

Down Home Comfort Bakery

Downtown Market

Dusty's Country Store

Edward Jones-Bret Hrbek

Explore Art & Clay

Family Preservation Services

First Baptist Church

Front Royal Women's Resource Center

Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce

G&M Auto Sales Inc

Garcia & Gavino Family Bakery

Gourmet Delights Gifts & Framing

Green to Ground Electrical

Groups Recover Together

House of Hope

I Want Candy

I'm Just Me Movement

Jen Avery, REALTOR & Jenspiration, LLC

Key Move Properties, LLC

KW Solutions

Legal Services Plans of Northern Shenendoah

Main Street Travel

Makeover Marketing Systems

Marlow Automotive Group

Mary Carnahan Graphic Design

Merchants on Main Street

Mountain Trails

National Media Services

No Doubt Accounting

Northwestern Community Services Board

Ole Timers Antiques

Penny Lane Hair Co.

Philip Vaught Real Estate Management

Phoenix Project

Reaching Out Now

Rotary Club of Warren County

Royal Blends Nutrition

Royal Cinemas

Royal Examiner

Royal Family Bowling Center

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Oak Computers

Royal Oak Bookshop

Royal Spice

Ruby Yoga

Salvation Army

Samuels Public Library

SaVida Health

Skyline Insurance

St. Luke Community Clinic

Studio Verde

The Institute for Association & Nonprofit Research

The Studio-A Place for Learning

The Valley Today - The River 95.3

The Vine and Leaf

Valley Chorale

Vetbuilder.com

Warren Charge (Bennett's Chapel, Limeton, Asbury)

Warren Coalition

Warren County Democratic Committee

Warren County Department of Social Services

Warrior Psychotherapy Services, PLLC

WCPS Work-Based Learning

What Matters & Beth Medved Waller, Inc Real Estate

White Picket Fence

Woodward House on Manor Grade

King Cartoons

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Carriage Barn in the Historic Area. Join professional outdoor instructor Tim MacWelch to learn about the remarkable springtime wild edible and medicinal plants of the Blue Ridge Mountains. This full-day hike will cover native and[...]
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