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Cardinals notch another home game win

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After three games on the road, the Cardinals returned home Wednesday night to face the New Market Rebels, and accomplished a come from behind win.

Although the Rebels were out in front early, scoring two runs in the first two innings, Cardinals starting pitcher, Peter Schuldt, along with a sharp Cardinals defense, came through in the next two innings, keeping the Rebels’ bats quiet and runners off base. The Cardinals came to life in the fifth, and saw 11 batters go to the plate in the inning. Strategic hits from Dylan Menhennett and Matt Cooper, along with two walks and a series of Rebel errors, fueled a five-run inning for the Cardinals. The Rebels chipped away at the Cardinal lead over the next three innings, and cut the lead to one run in the top half of the eighth inning. In the bottom half of the eighth inning, the Cardinals offensive came through once again. Four hits by Menhennett, Derrek Orndorff, Easton Waterman, and Trey Fields scored three more runs for the Cardinals. Cardinals’ closer, Arrison Perez, was able to hold the Rebels to one run in the ninth inning, and the Cardinals won with a final score of 9-6.

Coach praised the determination of his team, saying, “Comeback wins always feel pretty good and to get them on back to back nights is even better. Schuldt gave us his second straight good start on the mound and Menhennett continues to be red hot with four more hits at the plate. The add-on runs we got in the eighth were huge.”

The Cardinals have only three home games remaining in regular season play. The next home game is scheduled for Friday, July 19th, against the Winchester Royals. Game begins at 7:00pm

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Jenspiration

Merikit Uganda Rotary Global Grant – Water!

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Kathy Napier, member of the Rotary Club of Warren County, presented “Uganda 2019” a voyage to Africa with George Karnes, Ron Napier, Beth Waller, Liz Gibbs, and other Rotary International Rotarians. The main purpose of the trip was to attend the dedication of the Sam F. Owori Memorial Wash Global Grant Project.

The idea of a project in Uganda began at the Governor’s training, where 30 rising district governors from Zone 29 and 30 met and decided on a project to honor the incoming Rotary International President, Sam Owori, who was from Uganda. Sam, who had been elected to serve as president of Rotary International in 2018-19, would have been the second African Rotary member, and the first Ugandan, to hold that office. The idea was to construct a well for a school in Uganda to honor Sam. And George, as the incoming District Governor for District 7570, was put in charge of obtaining a global grant for this purpose. Sam was thrilled at the idea of the project.

Unfortunately, after surgery, Sam died, and it looked like the project would pass with him. There was a groundswell of support for a project in Uganda to honor Sam’s memory and the proposed project in Merikit. George expanded plans for the original project to bring a much larger water system to Merikit, and enlisted the aid of other Rotary Districts and Clubs, to support the larger project. As a result, more than $228,000 was raised from 42 Rotary Districts and 22 Rotary Clubs. Rotary International partnered with the Clean The World organization, and the project became the Sam F. Owori Memorial Wash Global Grant Project.

Merikit, the remote village where Sam had grown up, is a community of 4,000 people which grows to 10,000 during the day. The grant provides a solar-powered pump water system for more than 3,000 homes and the local maternity ward. On one of his visits to the village with Walter Hughes George found that the local medical clinic required the presentation of 100 liters of water during the dry season before they would allow pregnant women to enter the facility and have their babies. As a result, many babies were born on the steps of the clinic.

Also sanitation was a problem, with the lack of latrines. This all would change as a result of the grant: the new system pumps water into the huge steel water tank, which holds more than one hundred thousand liters of water. The project also provides five schools in the area with disposable toilets, and the village received two micro flush toilets. The maternity ward now has a hot shower for its patients. No longer would pregnant women deliver their babies on the steps.

The grant also provided for the training of forty-eight toilet makers, giving these craftsmen a source of income. Thirty school teachers and ten health workers have been trained as trainers, in order to improve on sanitation, health, and menstrual hygiene for girls. A water users committee has been trained and equipped to maintain, sustain, and manage the distribution system.

On October 26, 2019, a day-long ceremony was held to officially transfer the project to the villagers, with Sam’s wife Nora in attendance, along with Kathy, Ron, and George, Rotary Club members from Kampala, and Ugandan governmental officials. It was a joyous occasion and a lot of fun, culminating with everyone dancing. Kathy said that she was struck by the friendliness of all the people in Uganda. Known as “the Pearl of Africa,” Uganda is a developing country with a bright future. After presenting a brief history of the country, she noted a striking statistic about Uganda: the media age in Uganda is 16.7. Forty-six percent of the population is 14 or under; and another twenty-one percent is aged 15 to 24.

During the trip they also visited the Light Up Front Royal Academy, a school started by Beth Waller in December 2017 in the remote village of Bunyade,Uganda. It provides educational facilities for the children of the village. The school, which has an excellent reputation, now serves more than 200 children, and Beth is actively working to improve the school.

Message from Beth: “I’m so honored to be a part of the Rotary family and to witness the amazing work they are doing in Uganda, all over the world and in my own community. I’m looking forward to an even brighter future of global impact work now that I am a Rotarian and connected with fantastic like-minded individuals working together to make more of a difference on our planet.”

Finally, after the celebration, they toured the Murchison Falls National Park, where the animals were more than happy to greet and perform for visiting Rotarians.

Watch this video of the entire presentation:

Watch this video by Beth Waller and George Karnes:

For more information, please go to www.warrencountyrotary.org

This story is a collaborative effort by Hank Ecton & Jennifer Avery.
Photo credit: Kathy Napier (picture quote by Jenspiration)
#RCWC #RotaryConnectsTheWorld

Ugandans gift local businessman with goat for providing fresh water to African village

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EDA in Focus

Economic Development Authority Board of Directors Meeting – January 24, 2019

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The Economic Development Authority held their monthly Board of Directors meeting on January 24, 2020.

One of the topics was the sale of the Stokes Market (most recent the Main Street Market) to William Huck, owner of C&C Frozen Treats on Main Street in Front Royal. Huck has been trying to remodel the property he owns adjacent to C&C but because of costs higher than anticipated and issues with zoning and permitting, he has been exploring other options to open his newest business known as My Lagniappe – it’s a Louisiana expression that means ‘An extra or unexpected gift or benefit, such as that given to customers when they purchase something.’ If you know Huck, you know he always offers his customers a little lagniappe.

William Huck of C&C Frozen Treats say he’s invested in Front Royal 110% – now better place on earth. Supervisors Delores Oates and Cheryl Cullers seem to agree. Photos and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

The solar panels on the roof of the EDA office building was also a point of discussions. The EDA is advertising for any party interested in purchasing the solar electric system currently stationed on top of the EDA Building at 400 Kendrick Lane, Front Royal.

County Administrator Doug Stanley thanks EDA Board for offer of solar panels to RSW Jail, but no thanks.

The RSW Jail has said they are not interested in the solar panels. The cost of installation and unknown purchase price makes the project not cost effective.

Discussion also included workforce housing, the 2018 audit, Afton Inn renovations and the big one, running out of money by March.

Watch the EDA Board at work in this exclusive Royal Examiner video:

Disposition of Solar Panels

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EDA warns – Beware the Spotted Lanternfly: identify, report & kill

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The threat to the county, regional and even state economies is huge, despite the tiny size of the bringer of that threat was stressed by Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority Board of Directors Vice Chairman Jeff Browne during a Communications Committee Report Friday morning, January 24.

The size of the economic threat from the spread of the 1-inch by half-inch Spotted Lanternfly was vividly indicated by Browne’s report of a $500,000,000 (or half a billion dollar) impact on Pennsylvania’s economy last year. The distinctive and tiny bug normally indigenous to China dating to the 12th century and also found in India, Japan, Korea and Vietnam, was first reported in the U.S. in September 2014 in Pennsylvania.

It was first reported in Virginia in Frederick County in 2018. In 2017 it was identified in single counties in Delaware and New York. It was also reported in New Jersey in 2018, the same year it was identified on 2,080 acres in Frederick County across our northern county border.

To illustrate the Spotted Lanternfly’s threat to Warren County from our north, Browne noted that by 2019 it had spread to 8,000 acres in Frederick County with a projection of infestation of 40,000 acres there in 2020.

Photo courtesy of College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University.

Browne’s inclusion of the Spotted Lanternfly in his Communications Committee Report came just two days after a multi-agency presentation at the Virginia Inland Port on the presence and threat to agricultural industries here from the Spotted Lanternfly. It is believed the bug’s ability to rapidly spread comes from a variety of factors, including its wide range of host plants (70 species); a lack of natural native enemies in newly invaded areas; and an ability to hitch rides on vehicles and on shipping packaging.

“The lanternfly’s sustenance is the sap in plant vines – favorites are the Tree of Heaven and grape vines, but they can also be found on black walnut, apple and cherry trees,” Browne reported. He pointed out that parts of Pennsylvania and Frederick County are currently under quarantine requiring physical inspection of commercial vehicles leaving those designated areas.

Involved in that Wednesday afternoon presentation at the Inland Port in northern Warren County were Amanda Bly of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs; Mark Sutphin, Extension Agent for Warren, Clarke, Shenandoah and Page Counties; as well as two landowners from Winchester and Frederick County.

“The focus was on getting the word out on how to identify the lanternfly in its four stages and informing businesses and homeowners what to do when they are found,” Browne told his board and three county supervisors present, Walter Mabe, Cheryl Cullers and Delores Oates.

Browne acknowledged Front Royal Community Development Director Felicia Hart’s role in the Wednesday lanternfly presentation at the Virginia Inland Port. The presence of the inland port here, and the port’s connection to Interstates 66 and 81 for truck transport of Virginia-based goods regionally points to the potential danger of the Spotted Lanternfly’s arrival in Warren County.

Jeff Browne explains the Spotted Lanternfly problem with EDA board. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

“We were glad you could work with the Town on this,” EDA Board Chairman Ed Daley told his vice chairman, though there were no representatives from the Town present to hear that sentiment expressed. Following County Administrator Doug Stanley’s monthly update on County projects, it was asked if a PDF or hard copy of the monthly Town Report generally presented by the Town Manager had been sent to the EDA office for the meeting. EDA Administrative Assistant Gretchen Henderson indicated she had not received one.

Spotted LanternFly Forum

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Spotted LanternFly Forum

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On January 22, 2020 a forum was held at the Inland Port in northern Warren County regarding the Spotted Lanternfy. Amanda Bly of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs; Mark Sutphin, Extension Agent for Warren, Clarke, Shenandoah and Page Counties; as well as two landowners from Winchester and Frederick County presented to 30+ county employees and two Warren County supervisors. The Royal Examiner was the sole representative from the press.

The focus on this forum was on getting the word out on how to identify the lanternfly in its four stages and informing businesses and homeowners what to do whey they are found.

The Spotted lanternfly (SLF) was first detected in Frederick County in northern Virginia in January 2018. SLF is native to China, where it has been documented in detail dating as far back as the

12th century. It is also found in India, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. SLF was first detected in the U.S. in eastern Pennsylvania in September 2014. By 2017, the range had expanded to 13 Pennsylvania counties and a single county in both Delaware and New York. SLF was detected in New Jersey in 2018. Researchers believe SLF likely arrived from China on shipping materials, possibly two years earlier than when it was first detected.

SLF is highly invasive and can spread rapidly when introduced into new areas. The invasiveness of SLF is attributed to its wide host range (more than 70 host plant species) and a lack of natural native enemies in invaded areas. SLF has overwintered successfully, and its geographical range in the Mid-Atlantic states is expected to expand.

Watch and learn in this exclusive Royal Examiner video:

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I-66 Outside the Beltway Project: Lane closures and traffic changes – Week of January 26, 2020

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Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project construction continues throughout the corridor during daytime and overnight hours as weather conditions allow. Current activities include (new activities of note are bolded):

• Bridge beam installation for Poplar Tree Road bridge over Route 28 (see traffic impacts below)

• Bridge demolition at Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road) flyover ramp and Waples Mill Road bridge over I-66 (see traffic impacts below)

• Constructing bridge foundations at Compton Road, Route 29, Route 28, Route 123, Vaden Drive, and I-495

• Small charge dynamite operations along I-66 East and West near Route 28 and Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) (see traffic impacts below)

• Bridge deck work for new collector-distributor road over Route 234 Business and new Route 28 bridges over I-66

• Relocating water lines at Jermantown Road, Stringfellow Road, and Gallows Road

• Constructing new utility duct bank and relocating underground utilities along I-66 East

• Constructing retaining walls along I-66 and Route 28

• Corridor-wide roadway maintenance as needed

The Transform 66 Outside the Beltway project will add express lanes stretching 22.5 miles from the Capital Beltway to Route 29 in Gainesville, rebuild major interchanges along the I-66 corridor, create thousands of new park and ride spaces, and expand trail options for cyclists and pedestrians. Learn more at Transform66.org.

Upcoming Lane Closures and Traffic Changes
The following planned lane closures are expected to have significant traffic impacts. All work is subject to change based on weather and schedule. Find the latest information on travel conditions and work zones by visiting 511virginia.org or downloading the Virginia511 app.

ROUTE 29 / GAINESVILLE
Ramp from I-66 East to Route 234 (Prince William Parkway)
Tuesday, Jan. 28: Midnight to 4 a.m.
The ramp will be closed for overhead cantilever sign removal. Drivers will be directed to continue farther east to Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) South, turn right at Balls Ford Road, then travel back to Prince William Parkway.

ROUTE 234 BUSINESS (SUDLEY ROAD) / MANASSAS
I-66 East and West between Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) and Bull Run Rest Area
Ramps from Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) to I-66 East
Monday, Jan. 27, through Thursday, Jan. 30: 11 a.m. to noon
Temporary 15-minute stoppages of traffic on I-66 East and West for blasting operations. Additionally, stoppages will occur on the ramp from Sudley Road to I-66 East. Stoppages may also be needed on Vandor Lane.

Ramp from I-66 West to Route 234 Business (Sudley Road) North
Friday, Jan. 31, and Saturday, Feb. 1: 11 p.m. to 8 a.m.
The ramp will be closed for underground drainage culvert work. Drivers will be directed to Route 234 Business South, turn right at the third traffic signal onto Coverstone Drive, take the first right at Miramar Drive, turn right on Balls Ford Road, then turn left at the traffic signal on to northbound Route 234 Business.

ROUTE 28 (SULLY ROAD) / CENTREVILLE
I-66 East and West between Route 29 Centreville and Stringfellow Road
Route 28 North and South between Route 29 and Braddock Road
Braddock Road at Route 28
Ramp from Route 28 North to I-66 East
Monday, Jan. 27, through Friday, Jan. 31: 11 a.m. to noon
Temporary 15-minute stoppages of traffic on I-66 East and West, Route 28 North and South, and on Braddock Road near Route 28 for blasting operations. Additionally, stoppages will occur on the ramp from Route 28 North to I-66 East, and on the ramp from Route 28 North to I-66 West.

Route 28 North between I-66 and Westfields Boulevard
Ramp from I-66 West to Route 28 North/Braddock Road
Ramp from I-66 East to Route 28 North
Monday, Jan. 27, and Tuesday, Jan. 28: 11 p.m. to 4 a.m.
There will be a full closure of Route 28 North at Braddock Road from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m. each night for crews to install bridge beams over Route 28. Drivers will be directed to turn left at Braddock Road, then right on to Westfields Boulevard, then follow signs to Route 28 North.

The ramp from I-66 West to Route 28 North/Braddock Road will be closed. Drivers will be detoured farther west to Route 29 Centreville, turn right at the traffic signal on to Route 29 South, then right on to Stone Road, continue on to Westfields Boulevard, then follow signs to Route 28 North.

The ramp from I-66 East to Route 28 North will also be closed. Drivers will be detoured to Route 286 (Fairfax County Parkway) North, follow signs to Route 50 West, then follow signs to Route 28 North.

All lanes will reopen by 5 a.m.

Route 28 South from Westfields Boulevard to Braddock Road
Ramps from Westfields Boulevard East and West to Route 28 South
Wednesday, Jan. 29, and Thursday, Jan. 30: Midnight to 5 a.m.
There will be a full closure of Route 28 South at Westfields Boulevard from midnight to 5 a.m. each night for crews to install bridge beams over Route 28. Drivers will be directed to Westfields Boulevard West, then turn left on to Braddock Road and follow signs to Route 28 South. As an alternative to reach I-66, drivers can use Route 50 East and Route 286 (Fairfax County Parkway) South.

The ramp from westbound Westfields Boulevard to Route 28 South will be closed. Drivers will be directed to continue farther west, turn left on Braddock Road, and then follow signs to Route 28 South. The ramp from eastbound Westfields Boulevard to Route 28 South will also be closed. Drivers will be directed to the ramp for Route 28 North, stay to the right for Westfields Boulevard West, continue farther west on Westfields Boulevard, then turn left on Braddock Road and follow signs to Route 28 South.

All lanes will reopen by 5 a.m.

ROUTE 286 (FAIRFAX COUNTY PARKWAY) / FAIR LAKES
Stringfellow Road between Fair Lakes Boulevard and Village Square Drive
Monday, Jan. 27, through Friday, Jan. 31: 9 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 31, from 9 p.m. until 3 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3
The right lane of southbound Stringfellow Road will be closed for underground utility relocation. The lane will be reopened weekdays between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. to accommodate the evening rush.

ROUTE 50 / FAIRFAX
I-66 West from Blake Lane to Route 50
Monday, Jan. 27, through Thursday, Jan. 30: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Three lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road. Drivers should expect slowdowns and occasional 20-minute stoppages.

I-66 East from Monument Drive to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road)
Wednesday, Jan. 29, and Thursday, Jan. 30: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road.

I-66 East from West Ox Road to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road)
Friday, Jan. 31: 9 p.m. to 9 a.m.
Three lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road and Route 123. Drivers should expect slowdowns and occasional 20-minute stoppages.

I-66 East from Monument Drive to Waples Mill Road
Saturday, Feb. 1: 9 p.m. to 9 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road.

ROUTE 123 (CHAIN BRIDGE ROAD) / OAKTON – CITY OF FAIRFAX
Ramp from I-66 West to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road)
Monday, Jan. 27: Midnight to 4 a.m.
The ramp will be closed to implement a new traffic pattern for construction of the new interchange. Drivers will be detoured farther west to Route 50 East, stay to the left for I-66 East, then follow signs to Route 123 North or South.

Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road) North and South between Eaton Place and White Granite Drive
Monday, Jan. 27: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
A single lane will be closed on northbound and southbound Route 123 to implement a new traffic pattern for construction of the new interchange.

I-66 West from Blake Lane to Route 50
Monday, Jan. 27, through Thursday, Jan. 30: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Three lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road. Drivers should expect slowdowns and occasional 20-minute stoppages.

I-66 East from Monument Drive to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road)
Wednesday, Jan. 29, and Thursday, Jan. 30: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
Two lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road.

I-66 East from West Ox Road to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road)
Friday, Jan. 31: 9 p.m. to 9 a.m.
Three lanes will be closed for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road and Route 123. Drivers should expect slowdowns and occasional 20-minute stoppages.

Ramp from Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road) North to I-66 East
Friday, Jan. 31: Midnight to 4 a.m.
The ramp will be closed for crews to install concrete barrier. Drivers will be directed to continue farther north on Route 123, turn left at the traffic signal to I-66 West, take the exit for Route 50 East, then stay to the left and follow signs to I-66 East.

ROUTE 243 (NUTLEY STREET) / VIENNA
No significant traffic impacts scheduled.

I-495 (CAPITAL BELTWAY) / DUNN LORING
Ramp from I-66 East to I-495 South Express Lanes
Tuesday, Jan. 28, through Friday, Jan. 31: 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
The ramp from I-66 East to the 495 Express Lanes South will be closed for utility work. Drivers will be directed to the I-495 South general-purpose lanes.

Commuter Alternatives
VDOT and the project team have invested in a broad range of programs to help commuters and others stay mobile and safe during construction. Learn more about carpool, vanpool, telework, and commuter bus alternatives.

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Fourteen graduate Warren County Volunteer Fire Academy

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The 2019 Fire Academy Graduating Class at their final live fire training event. Photo courtesy of Warren County Volunteer Fire Academy.

On Wednesday, January 22, 2020 the Warren County Department of Fire and Rescue Services graduated 14 volunteers from its 2019 Volunteer Fire Academy.

This five month training program certified these students in CPR, First Aid, Hazardous Materials Operations, Firefighter Level I and Level II and various other ancillary certifications. To achieve these certifications, students invested over 320 hours of classroom and hands-on learning and many more hours at home or at their respective volunteer fire station. These students read multiple text books that when combined, consist of over 2000 pages of course materials. They completed 22 written and practical benchmark quizzes, four practical skills assessments, three written state exams, three state practical skills exams, and four live fire training exercises.

Fire Chief Richard E. Mabie stated “it is my honor to see these 14 individuals achieve great success and I look forward in watching them serve their communities as newly certified firefighters.” Graduates of the program include (listed by name and station affiliation):

 Michael P. Crawford, John H. Enders, Station #1 (Clarke County)

 Peter A. Flint, Rivermont, Station #2

 Andrew W. Hoffman, Front Royal, Station #1

 Amy N. Holsinger, North Warren, Station #10

 Jennifer W. Horne, North Warren, Station #10

 James S. Kowalewski Jr., Linden, Station #4

 Ciara T. McArdle, North Warren, Station #10

 David R. Moler, North Warren, Station #10

 Terry D. Miller, Linden, Station #4

 Dallas J. Neely, Rivermont, Station #2

 Jordan J. Richardson, Warren County, Station #6

 Madelyne G. Riggs, Warren County, Station #6

 Melody N. Riggs, Warren County Station #6

 Andrew N. Volz, Rivermont, Station #2

During the graduation ceremony, special achievement awards were presented to Jennifer Horne for Outstanding Academic; Andrew W. Hoffman for Outstanding Performance; and Andrew N. Volz for Top of the Class.

To learn how you can become a community volunteer at your local fire and ems station, visit www.warrencountyfire.com or contact our Fire Administration Office at 540-636-3830.

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
36°
Mostly Cloudy
07:2317:27 EST
Feels like: 32°F
Wind: 5mph WSW
Humidity: 76%
Pressure: 29.93"Hg
UV index: 0
SatSunMon
min 30°F
45/31°F
48/30°F

Upcoming Events

Jan
29
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 29 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
Jan
30
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 30 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
Jan
31
Fri
7:00 pm Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Jan 31 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Love Revival - FREE Monthly Community Dinner @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Free Community Dinner for everyone! Come enjoy a hot meal on the last Friday of every month at Love Revival Ministry Center.
Feb
1
Sat
10:00 am Books and Barks @ Samuels Public Library
Books and Barks @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 1 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Books and Barks @ Samuels Public Library
Come to our extremely popular monthly program that gives developing readers the chance to read and relax with a trained therapy dog.  For beginning readers and up.  Choose a time slot at registration, which begins[...]
11:00 am HSWC Polar Plunge @ Northern Virginia 4-H Center
HSWC Polar Plunge @ Northern Virginia 4-H Center
Feb 1 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
HSWC Polar Plunge @ Northern Virginia 4-H Center
The Humane Society of Warren County will hold their 1st annual Polar Plunge event on February 1st at the Culpeper Lake, located at the Northern Virginia 4-H Center in Harmony Hollow. “Plungers” are asked to[...]
2:00 pm World of Lego @ Samuels Public Library
World of Lego @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 1 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
World of Lego @ Samuels Public Library
Children ages 5 and up are invited to explore all the amazing things you can do with Legos.  Registration begins January 1.
Feb
4
Tue
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 4 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 4 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, February 4 – Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! After[...]
Feb
5
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 5 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
Feb
6
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 6 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]