Connect with us

Business

Corporate experience aids small business owners

Published

on

Many entrepreneurs are in a hurry to get away from corporate life to start their own small business but Inc. Magazine uses two ex-Goldman Sachs employees to explain that many of these same people will benefit greatly from their time at a large company. Rather than starting a business right out of college, or even during school, the exposure to a successful company’s people and processes will help provide a benchmark for solo success. Having a name that people recognize on a resume, meanwhile, might mean the difference between being funded or failing to launch in the future.

Large companies were once small businesses themselves, and the culture that formed the backbone of the initial startup was likely a significant reason for their success. Innovation and work ethic can all be a direct result of the culture of a business, and even if a potential entrepreneur doesn’t agree with the current state of affairs, it will be a point of reference from which to deviate.

Part of that company’s culture will have had something to do with performance, and it is likely that there are many incredibly talented people working in a large business that have accomplished great things during their careers. Not everyone wants to make it on their own, and these kinds of companies also draw bright young talent each year after college. Having these individuals as peers and mentors should not be discounted and provides a healthy dose of competitive spirit for the young up and comers.

A great culture of performance, armed with talented people, will drive systems to help secure the success of a large business well into the future and these processes are found within training programs, logistics, human resources, and every other part of running a vast enterprise. Having systems and processes are crucial if a business is going to scale past the initial stages and it is easy to lack appreciation and knowledge of this without seeing it firsthand.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business

Opportunities for disabled workers at small businesses

Published

on

Two tax credits make it more affordable to accommodate disabled workers in small business.

According to Small Business Trends, The Disabled Access Credit guarantees a credit of up to $5,000 on expenditures of up to $10,250 for modifying equipment, hiring sign language interpreters, providing Braille documents and more.

The Architectural Barrier Removal Tax Deduction allows for a tax deduction of up to $15,000 for building new ramps, curb cuts, parking spaces, and other accessibility options at their place of business to accommodate those with special needs.

Generally, the disabled population has a harder time securing full-time employment and statistics show that the unemployment rate among this group was around 8 percent in 2017 compared to 4.1 percent of the non-disabled population. Employers may avoid hiring disabled workers because they feel as though it would be difficult to fire them for poor performance or they don’t understand or don’t want to deal with accommodating someone with special needs.

Continue Reading

Business

What are small business accelerators and incubators?

Published

on

Small business accelerators and incubators can provide crucial help to new and growing small businesses in the form of support, direction, and funding, according to Inc. Magazine.

According to the National Business Incubation Association, survival rates for participants in new business incubation programs is 87 percent after five years compared to 44 percent of groups that don’t use the services.

Incubator programs come in at the beginning stages of a startup, and their focus is on providing office space, skills training, networking opportunities, mentorship, and some access to financing. Accelerator programs are aimed at new, but more mature, businesses that need to step up growth.

According to Small Business Trends, incubator programs took off during the 1980s when universities began providing these services to their entrepreneurial students to help get them off the ground. Even today, many startup incubators are educational or government nonprofits that aren’t able to provide much capital investment themselves but instead focus on slow growth and ongoing support. For-profit incubators can, however, offer more early-stage funding in exchange for equity and partial control of the company.

As their name implies, accelerators are meant to take a young company and help it rapidly expand. During the course of months-long, boot camp-style programs, incubators focus on specific development projects and tight deadlines meant to scale a business to profitability while sorting out any issues with strategy, operations, and organization.

According to Harvard Business Review, there were almost 200 accelerators in the U.S. between 2005-2015 that collectively invested in more than 5,000 new businesses with a total of $19.5 billion in capital. While joining such programs will by no means ensure success, many successful names such as AirBnB, Dropbox, and Stripe were able to leverage the access to high-profile investors and mentors to grow their valuations over the $1 billion mark.

Continue Reading

Business

Five qualities of a successful entrepreneur

Published

on

Dreaming of starting a business? Wondering what it takes to make it as an entrepreneur? While there’s no one tried-and-true recipe, here are five qualities that successful entrepreneurs tend to have.

1. Leadership
Good entrepreneurs are go-getters who forge out a path through thick and thin. They are effective communicators who know how to rally, influence, motivate and inspire others.

2. Creativity
They’re forward-thinking individuals who are able to create a concept, an approach or a product that has long-term viability.

3. FOREsight
They’re possessed of a good deal of farsightedness, which is needed to look ahead and plan out the strategies needed to take their enterprise in the right direction.

4. Tenacity
Entrepreneurs never give up: they persevere despite obstacles. They work relentlessly, consistently managing to find ways to overcome the problems at hand.

5. Audacity
They’re risk-takers who rise to the challenge of finding success where others have failed. It’s not a question of recklessness, but rather of being able to weigh and tolerate the risks.

These are the secret ingredients shared by most successful entrepreneurs. If this sounds like you, chances are you too may be able to launch and run a successful business of your own.

Continue Reading

Business

Christmas gift giving etiquette in the workplace

Published

on

For a festive and confident holiday, follow the etiquette of gift-giving in the office, according to U.S. News.

Traditionally, employees don’t buy a gift for their boss or manager as it is considered poor form. Some companies ignore this rule and may choose to take donations for a group gift. Nobody should feel pressured into putting in money for these gifts or any other group-based event.
Still, gift swaps are common and can be a lot of fun. Two games are Yankee Swap and Secret Santa.

In the Yankee Swap, everyone buys and wraps an unmarked present and names are drawn to see who chooses and unwraps a present first. The next person up can either take a new gift or steal the one just opened. With Secret Santa, everyone gets the name of another person, and he or she is tasked with buying an anonymous gift just for them.

Pay attention to the spending limit, usually around $20, as well as what message a gift could be sending. Gag gifts can be dangerous if the recipient doesn’t enjoy the joke. Never assume your good intentions will be seen as good. Don’t go political, even if you know the recipient will like it. If you share political humor with someone, give them that gift as a joke outside the office.

Candy and baked goods are usually a safe bet, but mind the recipient’s religious or dietary restrictions.

Obviously, don’t buy a religious gift for a non-religious person or a Christmas-themed gift for a non-Christian.

Continue Reading

Business

Stay honest, positive in job interviews

Published

on

A previous employer can and will discuss your performance on the job, so be honest in interviews and stay positive when you are applying for a new job.

No one wants to hire someone who trashes their former employer or gossips about the employer to the hiring manager. The first thing the hiring manager thinks is that their company will get the same treatment when you leave them, according to The Balance Careers.

On the other hand, it is important to be honest, both about your own performance in a previous job and why you left the company. Potential employees should stick to the facts, admit their part in a bad situation, and attempt to be positive.

A hiring manager will probably contact a previous employer. Previous employers can generally share information about documented conduct, job responsibilities and performance, and sometimes salary information.

Just because a company is allowed to share details about previous employees doesn’t mean they will. Most larger companies might share documented negative performance information, but will not share gossip. Most large firms with dedicated human resources and legal departments will stick to basic facts only. Smaller operations might have fewer internal restrictions.

Regardless of what a former supervisor might say, job seekers should be frank when discussing previous jobs. A sudden red flag from a reference can make it appear as if an applicant is hiding information.

Owning up to termination, for example, doesn’t necessarily have to be a deal breaker if the incident makes sense within context. Avoid bad-mouthing a former boss or becoming defensive about the issue. Even with jobs that ended badly, be sure to add positive references whenever possible, as well as some from earlier positions, to make sure the problem isn’t the only thing recruiters see.

Continue Reading

Business

A week to celebrate entrepreneurship

Published

on

Held the third week in November every year since 2008, Global Entrepreneurship Week is touted as “a celebration of the innovators and job creators who launch startups.” This year, an estimated 10 million innovators and job creators are expected to take part in 35,000 activities and contests in 170 countries.

Global Entrepreneurship Week provides the ideal networking opportunity for new and young entrepreneurs to explore their potential, gain knowledge and connect with peers and mentors. Given that a large number of millennials have shown an unmistakable proclivity for entrepreneurship, the event is of huge benefit to them.

Undeniably, it’s business-savvy youngsters that we must thank for today’s most innovative products and services. This includes globally significant green technologies as well as non-conventional methods of working like co-working, co-creation and telecommuting.

The events around Global Entrepreneurship Week give entrepreneurs—and would-be entrepreneurs—the opportunity to engage in local, national and international activities such as conferences, workshops and round tables.

Most significantly, Global Entrepreneurship Week encourages the creation and development of the next wave of innovative small businesses, spearheading us all into an exciting and sustainable future.

Continue Reading

King Cartoons

Upcoming Events

Dec
20
Thu
3:00 pm St. Luke Community Clinic Annual... @ St. Luke Community Clinic
St. Luke Community Clinic Annual... @ St. Luke Community Clinic
Dec 20 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
St. Luke Community Clinic Annual Holiday Open House @ St. Luke Community Clinic
STOP IN FOR A FOR HOLIDAY COOKIES AND TREATS, MEET THE STAFF, AND TOUR THE CLINIC!
6:30 pm Oil painting for the non painter @ Strokes of Creativity
Oil painting for the non painter @ Strokes of Creativity
Dec 20 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Oil painting for the non painter @ Strokes of Creativity
Come join Gloria Howarton, self taught artist, and explore the rich medium of oil painting. This is a 4 week Thursday Evening Class from 6:30-9:00 pm. The dates are 12/06/2018, 12/13/2018 , 12/20/2018 and 1/3/2019[...]
Dec
24
Mon
10:00 am Paper Sculpture Party: Koi Fish @ Art in the Valley
Paper Sculpture Party: Koi Fish @ Art in the Valley
Dec 24 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Paper Sculpture Party: Koi Fish @ Art in the Valley
Create your own 5″ x 7″ koi fish paper sculpture with your friends! Schedule your own party for up to 8 people (3-person minimum). No drawing skills are necessary. Artist Tiffany Budzisz will walk you[...]
2:00 pm Annual Community Christmas Dinner @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptarment
Annual Community Christmas Dinner @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptarment
Dec 24 @ 2:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Annual Community Christmas Dinner @ Front Royal Volunteer Fire Deptarment
This is the fourth year of the Annual Community Christmas Dinner being held! It is on Christmas Eve, December 24th from 2 to 7pm at Front Royal Volunteer Fire Dept. A hot meal is provided with turkey[...]
Dec
25
Tue
9:00 am 2019 Dare to Dream Grant Applica... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
2019 Dare to Dream Grant Applica... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Dec 25 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am
2019 Dare to Dream Grant Application @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Front Royal Women’s Resource Center (FRWRC) Now Accepting Applications for 2019 DARE TO DREAM GRANTS (Take classes, start a business, purchase a computer, learn a new skill, train for a profession, start a non-profit, anything[...]