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Goodlatte speaks at Rotary luncheon, calls for better enforcement of existing gun laws

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Above, Virginia Sixth District U.S. House Congressman Robert Goodlatte was the featured speaker at the Front Royal Rotary luncheon on Friday, March 2. However, Denise Eastham, pictured below, was the meeting’s emotional focal point announcing some endowments left by her late husband Jim. Photos/Roger Bianchini

WARREN COUNTY – In what some constituents might consider a rare sighting in the northwestern outreaches of Virginia’s Sixth U.S. Congressional House District, Congressman Goodlatte addressed the weekly luncheon of the Front Royal Rotary Club on Friday, March 2.

Goodlatte was the featured speaker, though for many the emotional high point of the noon gathering at the Blue Ridge Shadows Holiday Inn was the appearance of Denise Eastham, widow of long time Rotary member, former Front Royal mayor and local banker Jim Eastham, who passed last November after a courageous bout against pancreatic cancer. 

Mrs. Eastham announced some endowments to local agencies and Rotary left by her husband; and received a little help from her friends in tracking down a certain local tree cutter, whom she insists is going to get paid by her husband for including their property in some tree work, whether he wants to or not. 

But back on the political side, Goodlatte opened by acknowledging his post-2017 Election Day decision not to seek re-election in the 2018 Congressional mid-terms.  That November 2017 state election saw Democrats erase all but one of the Republican’s 16-seat majority in the State House of Representatives.  Citing his future political retirement, Goodlatte said he would miss his constituents, though he admitted some remained “grouchy about me”. 

Goodlatte then traced some recent actions and issues on the federal scene.  One presidential initiative Goodlatte reserved judgment on was President Trump’s plan announced in recent days to impose hefty tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.  The Sixth District delegate noted the plan was “making Wall Street nervous” as the specter of a trade war with China and Europe looms.  

Otherwise the House Judiciary Committee chairman generally towed the Trump Administration and Republican partisan line on things like tax reform and lowering corporate tax rates; what he termed “mandatory spending programs” like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid – they will not be eliminated, but reformed he said; infrastructure spending – singling out nearby Interstate 81 as a target for major improvements; immigration reform, including a long-term fix for DACA addressing the situation of people brought to the U.S. illegally as children, many of whom remember no other home and have become productive members of American society; and finally the issue at the forefront of many people’s minds after another mass school shooting – legislative action on gun control. 

In fact, the first three questions asked by Rotary members during a brief question-and-answer session following the delegate’s remarks were about access to semi-automatic weapons and school safety.  Goodlatte responded that he does not support a blanket ban on assault rifles of the kind used in the Parkland, Florida high school shooting that left 17 students and teachers dead.  Rather, the delegate said he thought Congress should focus on keeping such weapons out of the hands of people “who should not have them.” 

Instead of an emphasis on new laws limiting public access to semi-automatic weapons like those used in Parkland, Florida and last year in the Las Vegas concert shooting that was the worst mass murder in U.S. history; Goodlatte said he believed a “lack of enforcement of current laws” was the primary problem on the gun control front.  He called for increased prosecution of people who provided false information on gun purchase forms.  However, Goodlatte did indicate support for banning so-called bump stocks that essentially turn semi-automatic rifles into the machine guns they were designed to be used as in war zones. 

Asked what measures he would “support on Capitol Hill to protect students in school now” Goodlatte pointed to increased training to assure that existing response protocols during attacks were followed and met.   

The Congressman also dismissed the idea of raising the age at which semi-automatic assault weapons could be purchased from 18 to 21.  He noted states generally controlled age restrictions and observed that people are allowed to enlist in the U.S. military at 18. 

Congressman Goodlatte treads carefully on the volatile gun control issue, calling for better enforcement of existing laws and improved training of first responders.

Tax reform and loopholes 

During a brief interview with the media following the meeting, Goodlatte said he believed the boon to U.S. business from the Republican-Trump tax reform bill would eliminate the $1.5 trillion revenue deficit created by the bill’s largely corporate and top income bracket tax cuts.  Of the previous 35% U.S. corporate tax rate – a rate he called the highest in the developed world, reduced to about 21% by the Republican plan – Goodlatte admitted that some major U.S. corporations did not pay that rate when it was in place, at least on paper. 

“There are many, many, many companies that pay the full 35%. But there are some big ones, like GE (General Electric), that some years don’t pay any corporate tax. So, that’s also part of the tax reform – they will be paying more under this system.  Not as much more as I think they should have been,” Goodlatte said, stating he would have liked to have seen more in the way of closed loopholes in the tax reform plan, but believes overall the plan “will be better for the economy.” 

He added that he still believed spending cuts, including for programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid that he mentioned earlier, must be addressed or “shame on us.” 

Trump tariff threat 

Of the Trump tariff plan, Goodlatte elaborated, “I’m still looking at them – it’s a decision that the president gets to make.  Congress can respond and we’re looking at whether we should respond.  I am very concerned about these huge trade deficits that we run year after year after year.  It hurts the U.S. economy greatly when other countries send their products here and they set up barriers of various kinds to keep our products out of their countries.  And this is one response that the president has identified that he is taking.  But, as I mentioned in my remarks, it has some repercussions for doing so.  So, I think we need to look at this.” 

And the elephant on the Hill 

He also said that as Judiciary Committee chair he and his committee were keeping up with Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. 

“We have followed the matter very, very closely.  But we have said we are not going to try to duplicate, replicate the investigation,” the congressman began, then pivoting toward other investigations and investigative agencies.  “We have been very concerned about FBI actions taken in their investigation of wrongdoing of former Secretary Clinton and her affiliates.  And we’ve been very concerned about potential misuse of authority by the FBI in their seeking to do the investigation here in regard to the so-called Russia influence matter. 

“However, we have always said that Mr. Mueller should continue his investigation and that I support that investigation.  When he files a report we will certainly look very carefully at what he has to say.  But I also will say that there has been nothing that he has shown us so far that would indicate collusion by the Trump campaign with whatever involvement Russia had with attempts to influence our election, which I do think took place.” 

Just as images of Paul Manafort, Rick Gates, George Papadopoulos and happy-hour FBI employee “secret societies” began dancing in this reporter’s head, Goodlatte Chief of Staff Pete Larkin interrupted to say it was time for the congressman to “get going” – which is obviously why he is chief of staff, and a timely one at that.  However, he did leave me a staff press contact point by which to submit any follow-up questions.

Perhaps surprisingly, Congressman Goodlatte said he supported the special prosecutor’s investigation and believes there were Russian attempts to meddle in our electoral processes. However, he added he has yet to see any incriminating evidence of Russian collusion here.

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Overnight lane closures on I-66 for demolition at Route 123 and Waples Mill Road overpass this week, Jan. 27-Feb. 1

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Demolition of the current ramp from I-66 West to Route 123 (Chain Bridge Road) South, and partial demolition of the Waples Mill Road bridge over I-66 will require overnight lane closures on I-66 East and West between Blake Lane and Monument Drive starting Monday, Jan. 27, through Saturday, Feb. 1.

Demolition of the Waples Mill Road bridge over I-66 will begin as early as tonight, Monday, Jan. 27. Demolition of the Route 123 flyover ramp is planned to begin Wednesday night, Jan. 29. Demolition activities for both bridges are anticipated to last approximately three weeks.

Details include:

Monday, Jan. 27, through Thursday, Jan. 30
I-66 West from Blake Lane to Route 50
• A single lane will close at 9 p.m.
• Three lanes will close by 11 p.m. for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road and the Route 123 ramp (begins Wednesday, Jan. 29).
• Drivers should expect occasional 20-minute stoppages between midnight and 4 a.m.
• All lanes will open by 5 a.m.

Wednesday, Jan. 29, and Thursday, Jan 30
I-66 East from Monument Drive to Route 123
• A single lane will close by 9 p.m.
• Two lanes will close by 10 p.m. for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road.
• Traffic approaching Route 123 will be diverted to the collector-distributor lane on the right.
• Drivers should expect occasional 20-minute stoppages between midnight and 4 a.m.
• All lanes will open by 5 a.m.

Friday, Jan. 31
I-66 East from West Ox Road to Route 123
• A single lane will close at 9 p.m.
• Three lanes will close by 11 p.m. for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road and Route 123.
• Drivers should expect occasional 20-minute stoppages between midnight and 4 a.m.
• All lanes will open by 9 a.m.

Saturday, Feb. 1
I-66 East from Monument Drive to Waples Mill Road
• A single lane will close by 9 p.m.
• Two lanes will close by 10 p.m. for overhead bridge demolition at Waples Mill Road.
• Drivers should expect occasional 20-minute stoppages between midnight and 4 a.m.
• All lanes will open by 9 a.m.

The Waples Mill Road bridge over I-66 is being rebuilt to provide room for future mass transit as part of the Transform 66 Outside the Beltway Project. This work is being done in phases in order to maintain traffic on Waples Mill Road throughout demolition and reconstruction.

The current ramp from I-66 West to Route 123 South is being demolished to allow construction of new ramps for the redesigned I-66/Route 123 Interchange, to include Express Lanes access to and from the east and west.

All work is weather dependent and will be rescheduled if inclement conditions occur.

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‘Burns’ Night’ celebrated with haggis, neeps and tatties by kilted crowd at Virginia Beer Museum

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More than a hundred people, many dressed in Scottish plaid, jammed into the Virginia Beer Museum on historic Chester Street in downtown Front Royal Saturday night to celebrate the birthday of a far away and late-lamented Scottish poet, Robert Burns, who lived and died in the 18th century.

Bagpipes skirled, poetry was read, tartan kilts were the dress of the evening, and a haggis – sheep’s entrails cooked in the animal’s stomach – was eaten (by some), along with neeps and tatties (mashed turnip and potatoes). All was washed down with “wee drams” of Scotch whiskey, accompanied by many a toast to the Bard of Scotland.

The perfect host and hostess, David Downes and his wife Redz, in tartan splendor. Royal Examiner Photos/Roger Bianchini. (8925)

The event this year – owner David Downes launched the local Burns’ Night celebration in Front Royal three years ago – fell precisely on the poet’s birthday, January 25 (1759). A Scottish flag hanging outside the museum’s front entrance proclaimed the Burns night event.

From the official 6 p.m. start of the event, the crowd inside and out – a bonfire burned merrily in back of 16 Chester Street – was kept entertained by piper Sean Patrick while, between times, Eric Bartock, who claims no specific Scottish ancestry but provided the haggis, read the traditional Burns poem “Address to the Devil” to a more-or-less hushed audience, who were informed of Burns’ disdainful message to the Calvinists of his era. Bartok then presided over the presentation of the haggis by the sword-bearing Sloan Culver, and ceremoniously made the first cut.

Above, Beer Museum regular, Eric Bartock, reads “Address to the Devil” by Robert Burns near the formal opening of the celebration of Scottish ‘Bard’ Robert Burns’ 260th birthday; below, ‘Tickets, anyone?’ Special guest hostesses – Robert Burns was a known admirer of Scotland’s fairer sex – pull double duty in 50/50 raffle ticket sales.

Tribute was paid by Downes to several mini-dressed (tartans, of course!) young women who circulated in the crowd selling 50-50 raffle tickets and generally contributed an attractive side to the more sedate kilts of the menfolk.

Walter Mabe, the new chairman of the Warren County Board of Supervisors, dropped by and said a few words.

Among Burns’ best known “hits” is “Auld Lang Syne” published in 1788 and traditionally sung on New Year’s. was rendered last Saturday night by scores of lusty voices, during and following one of the “wee dram” toasts.

Above, the traditional Scottish haggis is ceremonially bagpiped from an upstairs dining area into the Virginia Beer Museum’s Burns’ George Washington Room, converted for the evening to the Robert Burns Room. Bagpiper Sean Patrick and ceremonial sword bearer Sloan Culver led the procession; as below Bartock brings the delicacy in for those with an adventuresome culinary streak.

Meanwhile, at local inns, pubs, and restaurants throughout the United States and most of the English-speaking world, people saluted the memory of this erstwhile Scot who penned 550 poems and songs throughout his relatively short life. The much loved “Rabbie” Burns died on January 1, 1796 at the age of 37.

He will never be forgotten.

The actual ‘Bard’, Robert Burns, at left in an 18th century print; to right, an actor ‘double’ several centuries later.

(Malcolm Barr Sr. of Rockland, who reported on this event along with Roger Bianchini – the latter noting the flow of Scotland in his maternal blood line – recalls covering a much more sedate, “posh” he called it, Burns’ night in Tynemouth, England, close to the Scottish border, in 1949. Downes’ event was Barr’s first Burns’ night celebration since that date 70 years ago, and he said it “brought back many memories” of his days as a teenage “cub” reporter in the United Kingdom.)

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Seven WCHS DECA students place in district competition

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On Friday, January 10, 2020, thirty-three (33) WCHS DECA students competed in the Virginia DECA District 9 Conference held at the Apple Blossom Mall in Winchester. Twelve students were recognized as finalists, with seven students placing in their respective competitive events.

DECA’s Competitive Events measure a student’s proficiency in knowledge and skills identified by marketing professionals as common academic and technical content across marketing, finance, hospitality, and business management and administration. Students compete in role-play scenarios and written tests. Students placing 1st, 2nd, or 3rd in these district events then are eligible to compete in the Virginia DECA State Leadership Conference to be held at VA Beach, February 28 – March 1.

The following students placed in their respective events:

  • Haley Cockerham: 1st Place in Principles of Hospitality & Tourism
  • Reina Garnett: 1st Place in Principles of Finance
  • Syndi Davidsen: 2nd Place in Accounting Applications
  • DJ Rizzo, Jr.: 2nd Place in Selling
  • Wes Merchant: 3rd Place in Sports & Entertainment Marketing
  • Jackson Pond: 3rd Place in Principles of Business Management & Administration
  • Kyra Robinson: 3rd Place in Personal Financial Literacy

Additionally, the students recognized as Finalists were:

  • Halea Hose in Entrepreneurship
  • Emily Johnson in Hotel Management
  • Makayla Grant in Personal Financial Literacy
  • Stephanie Chevez in Principles of Hospitality & Tourism
  • Niall Anderson in Principles of Marketing

Students placing at the state conference will be eligible to compete at the International DECA Conference to be held in April in Nashville, TN.

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Cajun cuisine, donuts and bagels coming to Front Royal’s East Main Street

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Following a closed session at its monthly meeting Friday morning, January 24, the Front Royal-Warren County Economic Development Authority Board of Directors confirmed what had been hinted at during the open portion of the meeting.

C&C Frozen Treats owner William Huck is poised to purchase the vacant Stokes Mart building at 506 East Main Street. By a 6-0 vote, Jorie Martin by phone, Mark Baker absent, the board authorized the sale at a price of $185,000. The EDA purchased the property including a detached, three apartment rental building, at the east end of Front Royal’s Historic Downtown Business District for just over $398,000 in 2014, during the executive directorship of Jennifer McDonald.

Current EDA Executive Director Doug Parsons has repeatedly expressed a desire to divest the EDA of the property, particularly due to the presence of the residential building on it, noting the property is generally not the type an EDA would invest in for economic development purposes.

As business partner and brother-in-law John Politz listens in doorway, William Huck, far right, reacts to EDA approval of his purchase of the old Stokes Mart building at 506 E. Main St. County Supervisors Cheryl Cullers and Delores Oates were interested observers, along with Walter Mabe, not pictured. No one from the town government was present to hear the announcement of the sale and business plan for the currently-vacant downtown property.

Huck said the plan for the building after some maintenance and remodeling work is for a café featuring Cajun-style food common to his native state of Louisiana, and freshly-made donuts and bagels, with accompanying non-alcohol liquid refreshments. Huck said he hopes to close on the purchase within the next few weeks so that he can begin needed maintenance in February.

“Yes, the building needs work like every building on East Main Street,” Huck told us, adding that he did not consider needed repairs, including to a leaking roof, too severe.

Huck will be partnering with brother-in-law John Politz – “I’m known as Farmer John around here” – Politz alerted us during a photo op walk to the property several doors down and across East Main Street from C&C Frozen Treats, shortly after the EDA meeting’s adjournment. Not to be outdone on nicknames, earlier during the EDA board’s closed session Huck regaled media and citizen observer Linda Allen with impersonations of a proposed “Crazy Willie” cartoon character he has been approached about as an additional marketing tool for his downtown business interests.

Huck and Politz read a little history of the property, which once housed Lane’s Tavern where in 1836 the first justices of the newly-created Warren County met.

As to those interests Huck said his focus will remain with C&C Frozen Treats, with Politz taking the lead on the Cajun food and accoutrements enterprise. Politz, appropriately attired in an NCAA football national champion Louisiana State University hoodie and jacket, and Huck helped this reporter with the spelling of “kolache”, a Cajun-style wrap that will be a key part of getting the café’s Alligator Sausage and other home-made Cajun delicacies to your palate.

Huck and Politz, or should we say Crazy Willie and Farmer John, explained that the production of the kolaches lends itself to adding fresh donuts and bagels to the menu.

Huck’s enthusiasm for his adopted hometown was apparent as we awaited his wife, Nina’s, arrival after she spotted us heading for the Stokes Mart property while driving by on East Main.

“I’ve said it over and over, this is the best community in the world – I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. I am invested in this town 110%,” the founding organizer of Downtown Front Royal’s “Family Fun Day” enthused, adding, “2020 is going to be a good year”.

Sure it needs a little work, but this family trio, from left, John Politz, Nina and William Huck, believe they are up to the task of repair and opening a Cajun-style café for downtown Front Royal at 506 E. Main St.


Economic Development Authority Board of Directors Meeting – January 24, 2019

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Jenspiration

How To series: Use Libby at the Samuels Public Library

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In the first video of the How To series, we learned how to get a library card to the Samuels Public Library.

Now let’s start learning about all the wonderful benefits the library has to offer. Ebooks with Libby is an awesome benefit available to card holders. Watch this video to learn more! Thank you to Barbara Way for helping to share this message about Libby.

How to use Libby:

  1. Download the App
  2. Locate your library
  3. Put in your library card number
  4. TAP through and enjoy!

Visit the library today!

Samuels Public Library
Mon – Thur: 10am – 8pm
Fri & Sat: 10am – 5pm
Sunday: Closed
(540) 635-3153
330 E Criser Rd, Front Royal, VA 22630

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Jenspiration

Merikit Uganda Rotary Global Grant – Water!

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Kathy Napier, member of the Rotary Club of Warren County, presented “Uganda 2019” a voyage to Africa with George Karnes, Ron Napier, Beth Waller, Liz Gibbs, and other Rotary International Rotarians. The main purpose of the trip was to attend the dedication of the Sam F. Owori Memorial Wash Global Grant Project.

The idea of a project in Uganda began at the Governor’s training, where 30 rising district governors from Zone 29 and 30 met and decided on a project to honor the incoming Rotary International President, Sam Owori, who was from Uganda. Sam, who had been elected to serve as president of Rotary International in 2018-19, would have been the second African Rotary member, and the first Ugandan, to hold that office. The idea was to construct a well for a school in Uganda to honor Sam. And George, as the incoming District Governor for District 7570, was put in charge of obtaining a global grant for this purpose. Sam was thrilled at the idea of the project.

Unfortunately, after surgery, Sam died, and it looked like the project would pass with him. There was a groundswell of support for a project in Uganda to honor Sam’s memory and the proposed project in Merikit. George expanded plans for the original project to bring a much larger water system to Merikit, and enlisted the aid of other Rotary Districts and Clubs, to support the larger project. As a result, more than $228,000 was raised from 42 Rotary Districts and 22 Rotary Clubs. Rotary International partnered with the Clean The World organization, and the project became the Sam F. Owori Memorial Wash Global Grant Project.

Merikit, the remote village where Sam had grown up, is a community of 4,000 people which grows to 10,000 during the day. The grant provides a solar-powered pump water system for more than 3,000 homes and the local maternity ward. On one of his visits to the village with Walter Hughes George found that the local medical clinic required the presentation of 100 liters of water during the dry season before they would allow pregnant women to enter the facility and have their babies. As a result, many babies were born on the steps of the clinic.

Also sanitation was a problem, with the lack of latrines. This all would change as a result of the grant: the new system pumps water into the huge steel water tank, which holds more than one hundred thousand liters of water. The project also provides five schools in the area with disposable toilets, and the village received two micro flush toilets. The maternity ward now has a hot shower for its patients. No longer would pregnant women deliver their babies on the steps.

The grant also provided for the training of forty-eight toilet makers, giving these craftsmen a source of income. Thirty school teachers and ten health workers have been trained as trainers, in order to improve on sanitation, health, and menstrual hygiene for girls. A water users committee has been trained and equipped to maintain, sustain, and manage the distribution system.

On October 26, 2019, a day-long ceremony was held to officially transfer the project to the villagers, with Sam’s wife Nora in attendance, along with Kathy, Ron, and George, Rotary Club members from Kampala, and Ugandan governmental officials. It was a joyous occasion and a lot of fun, culminating with everyone dancing. Kathy said that she was struck by the friendliness of all the people in Uganda. Known as “the Pearl of Africa,” Uganda is a developing country with a bright future. After presenting a brief history of the country, she noted a striking statistic about Uganda: the media age in Uganda is 16.7. Forty-six percent of the population is 14 or under; and another twenty-one percent is aged 15 to 24.

During the trip they also visited the Light Up Front Royal Academy, a school started by Beth Waller in December 2017 in the remote village of Bunyade,Uganda. It provides educational facilities for the children of the village. The school, which has an excellent reputation, now serves more than 200 children, and Beth is actively working to improve the school.

Message from Beth: “I’m so honored to be a part of the Rotary family and to witness the amazing work they are doing in Uganda, all over the world and in my own community. I’m looking forward to an even brighter future of global impact work now that I am a Rotarian and connected with fantastic like-minded individuals working together to make more of a difference on our planet.”

Finally, after the celebration, they toured the Murchison Falls National Park, where the animals were more than happy to greet and perform for visiting Rotarians.

Watch this video of the entire presentation:

Watch this video by Beth Waller and George Karnes:

For more information, please go to www.warrencountyrotary.org.

This story is a collaborative effort by Hank Ecton & Jennifer Avery.
Photo credit: Kathy Napier (picture quote by Jenspiration)

Ugandans gift local businessman with goat for providing fresh water to African village

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Upcoming Events

Jan
29
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 29 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
Jan
30
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Jan 30 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
Jan
31
Fri
10:00 am Citizenship Day Workshop @ Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington | Hogar Immigrant Services
Citizenship Day Workshop @ Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington | Hogar Immigrant Services
Jan 31 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Citizenship Day Workshop @ Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington | Hogar Immigrant Services
On Friday, January 31, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington is partnering with the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) to host its annual Citizenship Day Workshop. The workshop is one of six AILA is[...]
7:00 pm Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Jan 31 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Love Revival - FREE Monthly Community Dinner @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Free Community Dinner for everyone! Come enjoy a hot meal on the last Friday of every month at Love Revival Ministry Center.
Feb
1
Sat
10:00 am Books and Barks @ Samuels Public Library
Books and Barks @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 1 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Books and Barks @ Samuels Public Library
Come to our extremely popular monthly program that gives developing readers the chance to read and relax with a trained therapy dog.  For beginning readers and up.  Choose a time slot at registration, which begins[...]
11:00 am HSWC Polar Plunge @ Northern Virginia 4-H Center
HSWC Polar Plunge @ Northern Virginia 4-H Center
Feb 1 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
HSWC Polar Plunge @ Northern Virginia 4-H Center
The Humane Society of Warren County will hold their 1st annual Polar Plunge event on February 1st at the Culpeper Lake, located at the Northern Virginia 4-H Center in Harmony Hollow. “Plungers” are asked to[...]
2:00 pm World of Lego @ Samuels Public Library
World of Lego @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 1 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
World of Lego @ Samuels Public Library
Children ages 5 and up are invited to explore all the amazing things you can do with Legos.  Registration begins January 1.
Feb
4
Tue
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 4 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 4 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, February 4 – Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! After[...]
Feb
5
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Feb 5 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30: Puppies are cuddly! Puppies are cute! Our stories, songs, and craft will be about our friends, the puppies! Siblings[...]