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Governor Northam celebrates Virginia’s 13-spot jump to seventh place in U.S. News Best States ranking

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Photo courtesy of US News. https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/virginia

RICHMOND—Governor Ralph Northam today celebrated Virginia’s jump to seventh place in the U.S. News 2019 Best States Rankings, representing a 13-spot jump from 20th in 2018. In calculating the rankings, each of eight categories was assigned weightings based on the average of three years of data from an annual national survey that asked a total of more than 50,000 people to prioritize each subject in their state. The data behind the rankings aims to show how well states serve their residents in a variety of ways. In addition to healthcare and education, the metrics consider a state’s economy, infrastructure, fiscal stability, public safety, natural environment, and the opportunity it affords its residents.

Virginia experienced the most significant improvements in its rankings from 2018 to 2019 in the categories of healthcare (from 29th to 18th), education (from 12th to 7th), economy (from 30th to 25th), and fiscal stability (from 14th to 8th).

“In Virginia, we are laser focused on growing and diversifying our economy, driving innovation, and bringing jobs and prosperity to all corners of the Commonwealth—and as a result we are making steady progress toward restoring Virginia’s standing as the top-ranked business destination in the country,” said Governor Northam. “Virginia’s rise to from 20th to 7th in the U.S. News Best States ranking is evidence that our priorities of expanding healthcare, investing in education, and creating economic opportunity are paying off. I look forward to building on this momentum with our state, local, and regional partners across the Commonwealth.”

“We work tirelessly with many public and private sector partners to make Virginia more competitive, and it is gratifying that our efforts have been recognized by improved third-party rankings from an international news outlet like U.S. News,” said Secretary of Commerce and Trade Brian Ball. “We are moving in the right direction, and remain committed to focusing on the key areas for improvement that will push Virginia forward.”

Virginia recently has moved up in several business climate rankings, including those published by CNBC, Forbes, Site Selection, and Chief Executive. Most recently, Virginia improved from 15th to 13th in Chief Executive’s Best and Worst States for Business. The latest Chief Executive ranking was based on a national survey of business executives conducted from late February to mid-March of this year.

“I am very grateful for all that Governor Northam and the General Assembly have been doing to improve Virginia’s business climate and make us more competitive for economic development opportunities, said VEDP President and CEO Stephen Moret. “With the full implementation of several recently funded initiatives, such as Virginia’s historic tech-talent investment program and a big investment in rural broadband, as well as new initiatives focused on marketing Virginia for business, preparing sites for development, and launching a world-class custom workforce solutions program, Virginia will be poised for additional improvements in our national rankings and more economic development wins.”

“Recent investments in and modernizations across Virginia’s education continuum are better preparing our workforce to drive Virginia’s economy forward,” said Secretary of Education Atif Qarni. “Providing every Virginian the opportunity to access high quality education at every level is a top priority for the Commonwealth, and our shared commitment to that will build a strong foundation for Virginia’s success for decades to come.”

Read more about the U.S. News 2019 Best States Rankings and the Chief Executive 2019 Best and Worst States for Business.

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Governor Northam COVID-19 update briefing – July 14, 2020; calls for stronger enforcement of COVID-19 guidelines

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Governor Northam joins the Virginia Emergency Support Team to share the latest updates on the COVID-19 response. Here are the highlights:

  • increasing statewide cases
  • increase testing
  • on average, 10,000 tests administered daily statewide
  • the state should increase the enforcement of face coverings and social distancing
  • reminded business owners that they have the right to deny service to someone who is not following the mask mandate or social distancing guidelines
  • plan to impose an earlier cutoff for alcohol sales at restaurants is also being considered
  • state continues to receive shipments of personal protective equipment, and hospitals have reported no shortages
  • school boards and universities will continue to make decisions regarding this school year
  • update on the rent and mortgage relief program
  • DMV locations continue to reopen
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2020 Independence Day holiday traffic crashes claim nine lives

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Unfortunately, thousands of drunk, speeding and reckless drivers kept Virginia State Police busy and put countless lives at risk during the 2020 July 4th holiday weekend across the Commonwealth. Preliminary reports indicate nine individuals, to include a 4-year-old child, died during the holiday statistical counting period that began at 12:01 a.m. July 2, 2020 and concluded at midnight July 5, 2020. During the 2019 July 4 holiday counting period, there were seven traffic deaths on Virginia highways.

The nine fatal crashes occurred in the counties of Albemarle, Arlington, Augusta, Bedford, Carroll, James City, Lunenburg, Prince Edward and Russell counties. The Augusta County, Arlington County and Russell County crashes involved motorcycles. The Prince Edward County crash claimed the life of a 4-year-old Charlotte County male.

“Even though state police did its part to enhance its response times and traffic safety enforcement efforts, too many motorists still put their lives and others at risk during the holiday weekend by failing to drive smart, safe or sober,” said Colonel Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “As we look towards the remainder of the summer travel season, I can’t stress enough the need for every driver and passenger, motorcyclist and bicyclist, pedestrian and commercial vehicle driver to make travel safety a priority. Sharing the road responsibly, complying with speed limits, buckling up and never driving impaired or distracted are what it takes to reduce crash-related injuries and deaths on Virginia’s highways.”

During the Operation Crash Awareness Reduction Effort’s (C.A.R.E.) four-day statistical counting period, Virginia troopers arrested 44 drunk drivers. In addition, state troopers cited 1,537 speeders and 732 reckless drivers, and issued 126 citations to individuals for failing to obey the law and buckle up. During the holiday statistical counting period, Virginia State Police responded to a total 444 traffic crashes statewide and assisted 1,153 disabled/stranded motorists. Operation C.A.R.E. is a state-sponsored, national program intended to reduce crashes, fatalities and injuries due to impaired driving, speed and failing to wear a seat belt.

Funds generated from summonses issued by Virginia State Police go directly to court fees and the state’s Literary Fund, which benefits public school construction, technology funding and teacher retirement.

For more information on traffic safety and how to keep Virginia “Moving Toward Zero Roadway Deaths,” go to www.tzdva.org.

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Virginia’s phased reopening plan for Virginia schools

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Governor Northam announced a phased reopening plan for Virginia schools which gradually opens up in-person instructional opportunities for students as public health conditions permit. The first three phases of the plan are detailed below. While in-person instruction may vary by division and throughout the summer and next year, all divisions must resume new instruction with all students for the 2020-2021 school year. Regardless of the delivery format, all students are expected to cover the content over the course of the year.

This phased approach closely aligns with those outlined in the Forward Virginia Blueprint which allows businesses to gradually open up activities. Specific gating criteria, as defined by public health officials, must be met prior to entering into each new school reopening phase. If conditions worsen and the public health data indicate increased risk, school operations may need to revert to requirements in earlier phases. At all times, schools should be prepared for intermittent dismissals or closures depending on local public health circumstances. Finally, the guidance and requirements of each phase are subject to revision and updates as public health conditions evolve in the Commonwealth.

The phases for reopening school provide the parameters of maximum flexibility for in-person instruction that a division may utilize. Nothing prohibits a locality or region from being more stringent than options permitted here, and some divisions or regions may choose to provide fewer in-person offerings in any given phase based on local public health conditions.

The state has outlined the details of the first three phases of reopening schools and resuming in-person instruction. Phase I continues remote learning as the predominant mode of instruction but permits some very limited in-person options including extended school year, special education programs, and child care for working families in school buildings. Phase II expands options to more children, including summer camp in school settings, and in-person instruction for preschool through third-graders, and English Learners – for whom in-person instruction is not as easily replaced. Phase III permits in-person instruction for all students, but with strict physical distancing that may require staggered schedules. In all phases, schools should follow school guidance from the CDC, including enhanced social distancing measures, physical distancing, and cleaning, disinfecting, and other mitigation strategies.

Virginia’s phased reopening plan
The following guidance is intended to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 transmission in public and private school settings while supporting the resumption of peer-to-peer learning and providing crucial support for parents and guardians returning to work. These recommendations should be implemented in accordance with the Forward Virginia Blueprint, any existing Executive Orders, CDC Interim Guidance for Schools and Day camps and CDC Considerations for Schools, and in partnership with local and state public health officials.

Phases will be determined by monitoring public health data and key measures on disease transmission, healthcare capacity, testing capacity, and public health capacity to trace contacts of cases, and other relevant factors. The phased approach is intended to allow a gradual scale-up of operations and local school divisions and private schools may choose to proceed through phases at a slower pace if local public health conditions necessitate. Community mitigation strategies (e.g. physical distancing, enhanced cleaning, etc.) will be necessary across all Phases to decrease the spread of COVID-19.

Summary of Phases

Allowable Programs
• Phase I is effective immediately but is not intended to change the school division’s continuity of learning plans as they close the 2019-2020 school year.
• Remote learning is still the dominant method of instruction.
• School divisions may elect to provide in-person instruction for students with disabilities in both extended school year services and school year special education services, including private placements, with strict social distancing. Students will only attend such programs if the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team agrees it is appropriate and the parent consents. Virtual instruction may remain appropriate for certain students who may be challenged with adherence to the strict social distancing and safety guidelines as determined by the IEP team and the parents’ consent.
• With the approval of the Division Superintendent, accommodations may be offered for students to access the school building for critical instructional needs, such as accessing a secure assessment, if all health, safety, and physical distancing measures are adhered to.
• As is currently permitted, child care for working families may operate in schools but are subject to existing operational requirements for childcare programs and should be focused on providing programming/care to children of working families and limited to children in the local geographic area.
• The State Superintendent may continue to consider variances for other in-person instruction on a case by case basis. Such programs should follow all mitigation guidance.
• Schools may continue to ensure the provision of student services such as school meal programs.

Health, Safety and Physical Distancing Measures
• Schools should follow operational guidance from the CDC, including enhanced social distancing measures, physical distancing, occupancy, cleaning, disinfecting, and other mitigation strategies.
• Physical distance should be created between children on school buses (e.g. seat children one per seat, every other row) limiting capacity as needed to optimize the distance between passengers. In Phase 1, schools should limit bus capacity to 10 persons to the extent possible.
• The number of persons in a classroom should not exceed 10, and physical distancing of at least 6 feet should be maintained to the greatest extent possible.
• Other social distancing precautions should include, but are not limited to:
• Restrict mixing groups of students.
• Close communal spaces.
• No large gatherings, per the Governor’s Executive Order.
• No athletics or extracurricular activities may be offered.

Phase II
• Extended school year and special education services that are allowed in Phase I may continue to operate.
• Emergency child care for working families that are allowed in Phase I may continue to operate.
• Summer camp in schools may be offered to children of all ages. Programs should ideally be limited to children in the local geographic area.
• Schools may offer limited in-person instruction to preschool – third grade and English Learners students given the unique challenges of providing remote academic and social-emotional support to young learners and English language learners. Operational requirements include enhanced social distancing measures including physical distancing and other mitigation strategies.
• The State Superintendent may continue to consider variances for other in-person instruction on a case by case basis. Such programs should follow all physical distancing and mitigation guidance.
• Schools should continue to ensure the provision of student services such as school meal programs.
• Extracurricular activities (such as clubs) may be offered if social distancing mitigation strategies can be implemented.
• Athletics should be limited to an individual or team-based practice, skill-building drills or conditioning activities that allow maintenance of physical distancing at all times.
• VDH recommends that no youth recreational/school sports competition take place in Phase II unless physical distancing can be maintained at all times (e.g. individual swimmers showing up at scheduled times to have their event timed, etc.). A competition that involves contact with other athletes should be avoided.
• If socially distancing competitions are taking place, the following conditions must also be met:
• Outdoor recreational sports are allowable if 10 feet of physical distance can be maintained by all participants and spectators at all times and all shared items can be disinfected between uses. The total number of attendees (including both participants and spectators) cannot exceed the lesser of 50% of the occupancy load of the venue (if an occupancy load exists) or 50 persons.
• Indoor recreational sports (including practices and classes) may occur if 10 feet of physical distance can be maintained by all participants at all items and all shared items can be disinfected between uses. The total number of attendees (including participants, referees, coaches, etc.) cannot exceed the lesser of 30% of the occupancy load of the room in which the sport is being held or 50 persons.

Spectators may not be present except parents or guardians who are supervising children. Spectators must wear face coverings consistent with any active Executive Orders and due to behaviors that may bring greater risk (e.g. cheering), it is recommended that spectators be separated by 10 feet of distance from other persons.

Health, Safety and Physical Distancing Measures
• Schools should follow operational guidance from the CDC, including enhanced social distancing measures, physical distancing, occupancy limits, and cleaning, disinfecting, and other mitigation strategies.
• Physical distance should be created between children on school buses (e.g. seat children one per seat, every other row) limiting capacity as needed to optimize the distance between passengers.
• Physical distancing of at least 6 feet should be maintained to the greatest extent possible in all buildings.

Other social distancing precautions should include, but are not limited to:
• Restrict mixing groups of students.
• Close communal spaces.
• Limit outdoor activities/recess to 50 people, with a priority on social distancing and restricting mixing of classrooms.
• No gatherings (assemblies, graduations, etc) of more than 50 people (indoor or outdoor).
• No field trips.
• Limit extracurricular activities to those that can maintain social distancing, support proper hand hygiene, and restrict attendance to avoid severe mitigation.
• No athletics may be offered.

Phase III
Allowable Programs
• In-person instruction can be offered for all students, however, strict social distancing measures should be implemented.
• Remote learning exceptions and teleworking should be options for students and staff who are at a higher risk of severe illness.
• Mitigation strategies may impact operations and capacity limits. A multi-faceted instructional approach should be planned for Phase III.

Health, Safety and Physical Distancing Measures
• Social distancing and other measures will remain important prevention strategies. Additional operational requirements will include measures such as physical distancing, gathering limits, and other mitigation strategies (e.g. face coverings, class size limitations, etc). Schools should follow all guidance from the CDC.
• Physical distance should be created between children on school buses (e.g. seat children one per seat, every other row) limiting capacity as needed to optimize the distance between passengers.
• Physical distancing of at least 6 feet should be maintained to the greatest extent possible in all buildings.

Other social distancing precautions should include, but are not limited to:
• Consider restricting mixing groups of students.
• Consider closing or stagger use of communal spaces.
• Limit outdoor activities/recess to 50 people, with a priority on social distancing and restricting mixing of classrooms.
• Large gathering limits to be determined by Executive Order in effect at that time.
• Athletics and extracurricular activities may continue with some mitigation measures. More guidance will be forthcoming.

Beyond Phase III
• School divisions will return to a “new normal” for instructional and extracurricular operations in consultation with public health officials.
• Some restrictions may still be in place at such a time.
• Additional guidance will be forthcoming as public health data, safety precautions, and guidance evolve.

Public Health Guidance for All Phases
Schools should follow all CDC guidance for reopening schools. This includes, but is not limited to, the following:
• Implement strategies to prioritize the health of staff and students, mitigate disease transmission and maintain healthy environments.
• Provide remote learning exceptions and teleworking options for students and staff who are at a higher risk of severe illness.
• Daily health screenings should be conducted for staff and students upon arrival. These should be done safely and respectfully, in accordance with privacy laws.
• At this time, public health is still developing its contact investigation guidance/outbreak response guidance for school settings.
• Staff and students should use cloth face coverings when physical distancing cannot be maintained, as is medically and developmentally appropriate. Face coverings are most essential in times when physical distancing is difficult.
• Cloth face coverings should be worn by staff in times when at least 6 feet of physical distancing cannot be maintained. For example, a teacher standing in a classroom 7 feet from students
could teach without a face covering. During meetings or gatherings or in narrow hallways or other settings where physical distancing may not be easy to maintain, a face covering would
be prudent to wear. Other considerations such as speaking loudly, singing, etc. should be considered and may require additional distance.
• The role of children in the transmission of COVID19 is unclear at this time. Face coverings may be challenging for students, especially younger students, to wear in all-day settings such as school.
• Cloth face coverings are most important to wear in times when physical distancing cannot be maintained. Schools will have other prevention strategies in place (e.g. health screenings,
physical distancing, enhanced hygiene and cleaning protocols, limits on gatherings, etc.).
• Schools should encourage the use of face coverings in students as developmentally appropriate in settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained. Schools should strongly encourage older students (e.g. middle or high school) to use face coverings in settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained.

Local Division Plans
Before entering Phase II and III, every school in Virginia will be required to submit to the VDOE, and make publicly available, a plan outlining their strategies for mitigating public health risk of COVID-19 and complying with CDC and VDH recommendations, including face-covering policies and procedures. The Virginia Council for Private Education (VCPE) will receive plans submitted by private schools accredited through a VCPE Approved State Recognized Accrediting Association.

Additionally, public school divisions will be required to submit to the VDOE, a plan for providing new instruction to all students in the 2020-2021 academic year, regardless of phase or the operational status of the school at the time. This plan must also include strategies to address learning lost due to spring 2020 school closures. This should include a plan for fully remote instruction should public health conditions require it. Plan templates and additional guidance from VDOE is forthcoming.

New survey: Warren County Public Schools need feedback on fall back-to-school plans

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AG Herring says Virginia’s rape kit backlog has been eliminated

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Attorney General Mark R. Herring provided an update on his project to end Virginia’s rape kit backlog. AG Herring was joined by Director of the Virginia Department of Forensic Science Linda Jackson, and Sexual Assault Survivor, Advocate and Founder of H.E.A.R.T. Inc. Debbie Smith at a press conference held today, July 8, 2020.

Attorney General Herring has led the effort, along with the Virginia Department of Forensic Science and local law enforcement agencies, to eliminate a backlog of thousands of pre-2016 untested PERK kits held by law enforcement, some of which were decades old. The PERK testing initiative is one part of Attorney General Herring’s larger effort to change the culture around sexual violence in Virginia. In addition to eliminating the rape kit backlog, he has invested in training to make trauma-informed, survivor-centered responses the new standard has worked with DFS to launch the state’s first electronic statewide PERK tracking system, and has brought on additional personnel to support survivors.

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Virginia Department of Veterans Services continues phased reopening

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The Virginia Department of Veterans Services (VDVS) continues the phased reopening of offices and facilities that had been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Veterans and their family members must call or email their local VDVS office to make an appointment to meet in-person with a Veteran Services Representative (Benefit Services division) or a Resource Specialist (Virginia Veteran and Family Support program – VVFS).  All persons entering VDVS offices must wear face masks or face coverings and are asked to not bring along guests to their appointment unless necessary.

Telephone and e-mail services will continue to remain available for veterans and family members.

The following VDVS offices are currently open and accepting appointments for in-person assistance:

Abingdon Portsmouth Naval Hospital
Big Stone Gap Quantico
Charlottesville Richmond (McGuire VAMC)
Hampton Salem VAMC
Hampton Pinewood (VVFS only) Staunton
Fort Lee Strasburg
Loudoun Virginia Beach/Oceana
Lynchburg Williamsburg
Manassas Wytheville
Norfolk

The following VDVS offices are scheduled to open and begin accepting in-person appointments on July 13:

Emporia Pentagon
Fredericksburg South Hill
Fort Belvoir Springfield
Henrico Tazewell
Manassas Virginia Beach/Pembroke

The addresses, telephone numbers and emails of all VDVS offices are available on the VDVS website at www.dvs.virginia.gov/dvs/locations.

Everyone at the Virginia Department of Veterans Services appreciates the understanding and patience of veterans and their families during these challenging times.  VDVS has been working diligently to reopen offices as quickly as possible but only when the safety and health of all veterans and their families and staff members can be assured.

The Virginia War Memorial and Virginia’s three state veterans cemeteries have also reopened:

  • The interior portions of the Virginia War Memorial in Richmond are open Monday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday from 12 noon-4 p.m. Social distancing requirements are in effect, facemasks are required, and no more than 50 persons will be permitted inside the Memorial at one time. The grounds of the Memorial are open from daybreak until 10 p.m. daily. Details at vawarmorial.org.
  • The Virginia Veterans Cemetery in Amelia, the Southwest Virginia Veterans Cemetery in Dublin, and the Albert G. Horton, Jr. Memorial Veteran Cemetery in Suffolk are open, but with a limit of 50 persons permitted at committal services. Military funeral honors are provided based on availability of an honors teams from the Department of Defense or a veterans service organization. Details at dvs.virginia.gov/cemeteries.

About the Virginia Department of Veterans Services

The Virginia Department of Veterans Services (VDVS) is a state government agency with more than 40 locations across the Commonwealth of Virginia.  VDVS traces its history to 1928 and the establishment of the Virginia War Service Bureau to assist Virginia’s World War I veterans.  Today, VDVS assists veterans and their families in filing claims for federal veterans benefits; provides veterans and family members with linkages to services including behavioral healthcare, housing, employment, education and other programs. The agency operates two long-term care facilities offering in-patient skilled nursing care, Alzheimer’s/memory care, and short-term rehabilitation for veterans; and provides an honored final resting place for veterans and their families at three state veterans cemeteries. It operates the Virginia War Memorial, the Commonwealth’s tribute to Virginia’s men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice from World War II to the present. For more information, please visit www.dvs.virginia.gov.

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Minimum wage increases but doesn’t take affect until May 2021

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Here’s everything you want to know about the new minimum wage law than went into effect on July 1, 2020.

The new law increases the minimum wage from its current federally mandated level of $7.25 per hour to $9.50 per hour effective May 1, 2021; to $11.00 per hour effective January 1, 2022; to $12.00 per hour effective January 1, 2023; to $13.50 per hour effective January 1, 2025; and to $15.00 per hour effective January 1, 2026.

For January 1, 2027, and thereafter, the annual minimum wage shall be adjusted to reflect increases in the consumer price index. The measure provides that the increases scheduled for 2025 and 2026 will not become effective unless reenacted by the General Assembly prior to July 1, 2024. If such provisions are not reenacted prior to July 1, 2024, then the annual minimum wage will be adjusted to reflect increases in the consumer price index beginning January 1, 2025.

The measure creates a training wage at 75 percent of the minimum wage for employees in on-the-job training programs lasting less than 90 days. The measure also provides that the Virginia minimum wage applies to persons whose employment is covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act; persons employed in domestic service or in or about a private home; persons who normally work and are paid on the amount of work done; persons with intellectual or physical disabilities except those whose employment is covered by a special certificate issued by the U.S. Secretary of Labor; persons employed by an employer who does not employ four or more persons at any one time; and persons who are less than 18 years of age and who are under the jurisdiction of a juvenile and domestic relations district court.

Minimum wage does not apply to the following:

  • Any person employed as a farm laborer or farm employee;
  • Any person engaged in the activities of an educational, charitable, religious, or nonprofit organization where the relationship of employer-employee does not, in fact, exist, or where the services rendered to such organization are on a voluntary basis;
  • Caddies on golf courses;
  • Traveling salesmen or outside salesmen working on a commission basis; taxicab drivers and operators;
  • Any person under the age of 18 in the employ of his parent or legal guardian;
  • Any person confined in any penal or corrective institution of the Commonwealth or any of its political subdivisions or admitted to a state hospital or training center operated by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services;
  • Any person employed by a summer camp for boys, girls, or both boys and girls;
  • Any person under the age of 16, regardless of by whom employed;
  • Any person who is paid pursuant to 29 U.S.C. § 214(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended;
  • Students participating in a bona fide educational program;
  • Any person who is less than 18 years of age and who is currently enrolled on a full-time basis in any secondary school, an institution of higher education, or trade school, provided that the person is not employed more than 20 hours per week;
  • Any person of any age who is currently enrolled on a full-time basis in any secondary school, an institution of higher education, or trade school and is in a work-study program or its equivalent at the institution at which enrolled as a student;
  • Any person who works as a babysitter for fewer than 10 hours per week;
  • Any person participating as an au pair in the U.S. Department of State’s Exchange Visitor Program governed by 22 C.F.R. § 62.31;
  • Any individual employed as a temporary foreign worker as governed by 20 C.F.R. Part 655; and
  • Any person who is exempt from the federal minimum wage pursuant to 29 U.S.C. § 213(a)(3).
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