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The benefits of gardening

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Aging shouldn’t stop you from cultivating your interests. Whether you’re a long-time gardener or eager to pick up the hobby, here are some of the advantages to gardening as you get older.

Health benefits
Gardening is a form of aerobic exercise that strengthens major muscle groups and improves mobility. It also encourages you to spend more time outdoors where you can benefit from the sunshine and fresh air. Tending to a garden reduces stress, promotes relaxation and instills a sense of accomplishment. A vegetable or herb garden also gives you access to fresh, nutritious food.

Social opportunities
Gardening can be a collective pastime that allows you to meet new people or spend time with old friends. Studies show that strong social ties increase longevity, lessen cognitive decline and prevent depression among older adults. If you live in a retirement home, inquire about joining or starting a gardening club to connect with residents who share your interests. You can even make gardening a family activity and an opportunity to teach your grandchildren new skills.

Downsizing potential
A balcony garden or an assortment of houseplants will allow you to continue gardening once you’ve moved from a house to an apartment or retirement home. Many plants can thrive in pots and window boxes. If you’re used to growing a vegetable garden, microgreens can be grown in even a small living space. Also, plants make great roommates — they boost your mood, beautify your home and require little upkeep.

Gardening is an activity that can be done at any age. Find what works for you and don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty.

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Controlling cancer through screening

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Cancer Control Month takes place every year in April, and the occasion serves as an opportunity to take note of the fact that cancer screening saves lives. To help you advocate for your health and that of your friends and family members, here’s a timeline of when various types of cancer should first be screened for.

Cervical cancer: age 21
Women aged 21 to 65 should get a Pap smear every three years. Starting when they turn 30, they should also get an HPV test every five years. Women over 65 who had normal results over the last 10 years can forgo further testing.

Cervical cancer is highly treatable when caught early, making screening for it extremely important.

Breast cancer: age 50
According to the American College of Physicians, women with no increased risk for breast cancer should get a screening mammogram every two years starting at age 50 until age 75. However, women between the ages of 40 and 49 may elect to undergo screening after discussing the pros and cons with their doctor.

Breast cancer is by far the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. While survival rates are improving for all stages, the earlier it’s caught, the easier it is to treat.

Colorectal cancer: age 50
While people with early-stage colorectal cancer have a survival rate of 90 percent, the prognosis isn’t as good for symptomatic cancers, which are usually quite advanced.

For people with average risk, a first colonoscopy at 50 years old is recommended, with follow-up exams depending on the results. Earlier screening is recommended for people with increased risk, such as those who are of African-American descent, those with a family history or those with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

Prostate cancer: age 50
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. Detected early, the survival rate is nearly 100 percent.

However, research suggests there may be more downsides than upsides to getting tested regularly. For this reason, it’s recommended that men who are about to turn 50 have a discussion about prostate cancer screening with their doctor to determine whether they’re at high risk and whether screening would be beneficial.

Lung cancer: age 55
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Contrary to popular belief, it’s very treatable if caught early. The problem is that over 80 percent of lung cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage.

Current smokers, as well as former heavy smokers, aged 55 to 80, should be screened with a low-dose computed tomography (CT) scan.

Cancer screening saves lives, so don’t hesitate to remind friends and relatives to get tested.

Skin cancer
People of all ages can develop skin cancer. Talk to your doctor to determine your risk factors and to schedule regular skin exams.

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What are dental crowns made of?

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Dental crowns are used to restore the shape, appearance and function of damaged teeth. They can be made of one of several different materials, and each has its own pros and cons. Here’s what you should know about the various options.

• Metal alloy. These dental crowns last the longest and rarely chip or break. However, because of their color, they’re not considered suitable for teeth that are visible when talking or smiling. The type of metals in the alloy can include gold, platinum, chromium, nickel or others.

• Porcelain. These are ideal for front teeth because they can be tinted to precisely match the color of your existing teeth. On the other hand, they’re less durable than other types of dental crowns and are more likely to chip or crack.

• Composite. These also look very natural, and while they won’t chip as easily as porcelain, they tend to get worn down by chewing and brushing. They’re also more likely to stain.

• Porcelain fused to metal. These crowns combine the strength of metal and the look of porcelain. However, the porcelain can chip and consequently expose the metal. Additionally, if the gums are thin or recede the metal will show along the gum line.

When properly taken care of, dental crowns can last for up to 10 years. Be sure to brush twice a day, floss regularly and visit your dentist twice a year.

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Sea salt vs. table salt: which is healthier?

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If you think you’re making a healthier choice by sprinkling sea salt on your food instead of regular old table salt, think again.

Any type of salt, be it kosher salt, celery salt, garlic salt, table salt or pink Himalayan salt, contains the same amount of sodium, which is to blame for an increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular events and kidney disease.

The only healthier choice when it comes to salt is to avoid consuming it in excess.

North Americans eat nearly 3,400 milligrams of salt a day, more than twice the recommended amount. Using more herbs and spices to season food is a good way to cut down on sodium.

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4 easy ways to raise awareness about autism

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Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is a developmental disorder characterized by difficulties with social interactions, problems with speech and communication and issues with repetitive behaviors. However, no two people on the spectrum are the same.

In honor of World Autism Awareness Day on April 2, here’s how you can help people in your community better understand autism.

1. Get informed
Ensuring you’re well-informed about autism is probably the most important thing you can do. This is because misunderstanding the behavior of someone with autism can lead to very difficult situations and reinforce negative perceptions. Lack of accurate information can also lead to well-meaning people causing more harm than good.

2. Use social media
Sharing accurate information and articles is a good way to raise awareness about autism. Plus, if you or someone you know is on the spectrum, sharing a personal story can help people understand what it’s like to live with autism, and may inspire others to share their own experiences. Just make sure you respect the privacy of everyone involved.

3. Attend events
Organizations that support people with ASD tend to host fundraisers and walks. Attending or volunteering at these types of events is a good way to show your support and help raise awareness in your community.

4. Include them
Simply including people with ASD in your everyday activities can make a big impact and help raise awareness. It’s a common misconception that people with autism don’t want to make friends. While some do struggle to form relationships, most of them enjoy interacting with other people.

Keep in mind that though it’s a good idea to raise awareness for World Autism Awareness Day, these are things you can do year-round.

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5 things to know about tinnitus

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Tinnitus, which is the hearing of a sound without an external source, is a common condition affecting nearly a third of North Americans over 55. However, age-related hearing loss isn’t the only cause, and here’s what you should know.

1. It manifests in many ways. Typically described as a ringing in the ears, tinnitus can also sound like clicking, hissing, buzzing or roaring. It can also be loud or soft, low-pitched or high-pitched, continuous or intermittent and in one or both ears.

2. There are two types. In rare cases, tinnitus can be objective, meaning the noise is triggered by a physiological problem like abnormal muscle contractions in the ear region, and can be heard by a doctor during an examination. Much more frequently, however, tinnitus is subjective, meaning only the affected person can hear it.

3. It has many different causes. Tinnitus is a symptom of an underlying issue. The most common cause is hearing loss, either due to aging or to exposure to loud sounds. Other likely causes include earwax buildup and middle ear bone issues. More rarely, it can indicate vascular issues or a problem with the temporomandibular joint, where the lower jaw meets the skull. It can also be caused by a host of medications, so if you notice it, consult your doctor as soon as possible.

4. It can be treated. If tinnitus is due to a medication or an underlying condition that’s treatable, it’ll likely go away if the cause is dealt with. In other cases, environmental measures, such as fans, televisions, radios and white noise machines, can distract from the noise and reduce the anxiety and stress some people experience because of it. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has also been shown to be effective in helping people learn to live with tinnitus.

5. Stress can make it worse. Stress is likely to increase the negative psychological effects of tinnitus. For this reason, the avoidance of stressful activities and stimulants such as caffeine is often recommended.

If you think you may have tinnitus, consult your doctor. If they fail to find a cause, you’ll be referred to an audiologist.

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How to tell your loved ones you have Alzheimer’s disease

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If you’re coming to terms with an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, you may be wondering how to share the news with your family and friends. Here are a few recommendations.

Prepare yourself
Take some time beforehand to write down your thoughts and decide what you want to say. Hearing about your diagnosis for the first time can be almost as difficult for your loved ones as it was for you. Try to predict how each person might react and prepare a response. Arrange to be in a private, relaxed setting when you reveal your diagnosis to encourage openness and understanding.

Take it slow
You don’t need to go into more detail than you’re comfortable with during the first conversation. Hopefully it’s just the beginning of an ongoing dialogue about your experience with Alzheimer’s. You also don’t want to overwhelm your loved ones with too much information. Give them time to process the diagnosis.

Encourage education
Encourage your family and friends to learn more about Alzheimer’s. Negative reactions or denial following the diagnosis are often due to a lack of understanding about the disease. Ask your doctor for an educational brochure or visit the Alzheimer’s Association website for more information and resources.

Sharing your diagnosis can be difficult, but the support of your loved ones will make it easier to cope with the challenges ahead.

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Upcoming Events

Mar
31
Tue
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Mar 31 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, March 17 –  Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! This[...]
Apr
1
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Apr 1 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, March 18 and Thursday, March 19: Our stories, songs, and craft this week will be about friends! Come to story time and see your friends,[...]
Apr
2
Thu
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Apr 2 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, March 18 and Thursday, March 19: Our stories, songs, and craft this week will be about friends! Come to story time and see your friends,[...]
6:00 pm FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly ... @ Front Royal Christian School
FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly ... @ Front Royal Christian School
Apr 2 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly Modern Millie @ Front Royal Christian School
3 exciting shows: APRIL 2 – 6pm, April 3 – 7pm, April 4 – 6pm. Bring the family! Filled with fun flappers and a villainess that audiences will love to hate, Thoroughly Modern Millie JR.[...]
Apr
3
Fri
6:00 pm Fire Pit Fridays @ Shenandoah Valley Golf Club
Fire Pit Fridays @ Shenandoah Valley Golf Club
Apr 3 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Fire Pit Fridays @ Shenandoah Valley Golf Club
6:00 pm FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly ... @ Front Royal Christian School
FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly ... @ Front Royal Christian School
Apr 3 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly Modern Millie @ Front Royal Christian School
3 exciting shows: APRIL 2 – 6pm, April 3 – 7pm, April 4 – 6pm. Bring the family! Filled with fun flappers and a villainess that audiences will love to hate, Thoroughly Modern Millie JR.[...]
Apr
4
Sat
6:00 pm FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly ... @ Front Royal Christian School
FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly ... @ Front Royal Christian School
Apr 4 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
FRCS Spring Musical: Thoroughly Modern Millie @ Front Royal Christian School
3 exciting shows: APRIL 2 – 6pm, April 3 – 7pm, April 4 – 6pm. Bring the family! Filled with fun flappers and a villainess that audiences will love to hate, Thoroughly Modern Millie JR.[...]
Apr
7
Tue
10:00 am Focus on Health Employment & Edu... @ LFCC | Science and Health Professions Building
Focus on Health Employment & Edu... @ LFCC | Science and Health Professions Building
Apr 7 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Focus on Health Employment & Education Fair @ LFCC | Science and Health Professions Building
Two sessions: 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. Different vendors at each session. Held in the Science and Health Professions Building at LFCC’s Middletown Campus. Contact Taylor Luther for more[...]
4:30 pm Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Apr 7 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Novel Ideas @ Samuels Public Library
Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! Tuesday, March 17 –  Children will explore popular books and book series through S.T.E.M. activities, games, food, and more! This[...]
Apr
8
Wed
10:15 am Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
Apr 8 @ 10:15 am – 12:00 pm
Toddler and Preschool Story Time @ Samuels Public Library
10:15 Toddler story time | 11:00 Preschool story time Wednesday, March 18 and Thursday, March 19: Our stories, songs, and craft this week will be about friends! Come to story time and see your friends,[...]