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Miyares and Beamer lead effort to help protect 340,500 middle school students in Virginia this year.

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Attorney General Jason Miyares and legendary Virginia Tech football coach Frank Beamer announced a partnership with the National Child ID Program to provide child ID kits to 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade students across the Commonwealth.

The announcement occurred before the West Virginia University vs. Virginia Tech football game.

“As Attorney General, my biggest priority is keeping our children safe. That’s why I’m thrilled to join Virginia Tech legend Frank Beamer and launch the Virginia Child ID Program. The National Child ID Program is a free, easy, and effective tool to help Virginia parents prepare for the unimaginable,” said Attorney General Miyares. “When a child goes missing, the first twenty-four hours are crucial to law enforcement. These ID kits, kept safe by parents, are designed to assist law enforcement at the onset of the investigation so that more time can be used locating the missing child.”

“I am humbled by General Miyares’ dedication to protecting the children of the Commonwealth of Virginia. He is taking steps to ensure safety in his state and protect children from the grave threat of human trafficking. I am honored to partner with him on the National Child ID Program launch in Virginia,” said National Child ID Program Executive Director Kenny Hansmire.


“As a father and grandfather, I cannot imagine anything more important than protecting children. Attorney General Miyares and the National Child ID Program have taken significant steps to make Virginia’s children safer with this program,” Hall of Fame Coach Frank Beamer said about the partnership.

This year, the National Child ID Program celebrates its 25th anniversary. The program was created by football coaches in 1997 following the abduction and death of Amber Hagerman, the namesake for the Amber Alert. Since then, over 75 million child ID kits have been distributed nationally via public-private partnerships.

Each year, over half a million children go missing. In Virginia, 2,500 children have been reported missing, and 400 are actively missing. Unfortunately, 25% of all human trafficking cases include a child, and minority populations are three times more likely to go missing or be abducted.

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Virginia tried to crack down on unlicensed poker. It’s still happening in the open.

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When a Hampton Roads-area kitten rescue lost its lawsuit challenging a new state law cracking down on unlicensed charitable poker, it seemed like the end for the handful of poker rooms that recently opened in Virginia.

But a poker room in Virginia Beach is back up and running, advertising on Facebook despite the new law that threatens civil fines of up to $50,000. The Facebook page for the Beach Poker Room went quiet when the law took effect in July, but the facility now says it’s opening daily and running tournaments three days a week with buy-ins ranging from $120 to $160.

Whatever’s happening at the Beach Poker Room could be against the law, according to legislators who pushed to shut down poker rooms until the state can get a better handle on overseeing them.

If it’s charity poker, said Del. Paul Krizek, D-Fairfax, it’s the same type of unlicensed activity the General Assembly wanted to stop by creating civil fines of $25,000 to $50,000 per violation. If the Beach Poker Room avoids charitable poker rules by dropping the charity aspect altogether, Krizek said, it’s no longer the type of poker Virginia legalized.


“If it’s poker, it’s illegal,” Krizek said.

Several people who could potentially explain the situation at the Beach Poker Room, which operates out of a bingo hall called Bingo Palace that’s connected to a member of the state’s Charitable Gaming Board, either didn’t respond to inquiries from the Virginia Mercury or refused to comment for this story.

The Beach Poker Room didn’t respond to multiple phone calls and emails over several days. The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS), which regulates charitable bingo and poker, refused to comment. Sen. Chap Petersen, D-Fairfax, an attorney who was working with managers at the Beach Poker Room earlier this year to try to fight the poker room shutdown, also refused to comment.

Others involved in the charitable gaming industry argued it’s the General Assembly’s fault no one seems to know what’s happening with poker in Virginia.

A Virginia Charitable Bingo Association spokesperson said the legislature’s “totally flawed” handling of the industry’s attempted expansion into poker is to blame for unlicensed games continuing, possibly with no benefit to charities.

“I think Virginians should be asking their legislators if what they intended with this legislation was to put operators in a position to have to say, ‘Rather than incur these absurd fines and risk jail time, we will simply remove the charitable aspect of these games,’” said Liam Gray, whose bingo organization helped fight the General Assembly’s attempts to rein in charitable poker.

Amy Solares, a partner in the business entity behind Bingo Palace and vice chair of the Charitable Gaming Board, didn’t respond directly to phone calls and emails. In a statement given to the Mercury by Gray, she said she doesn’t own the facility itself and isn’t involved with poker.

“If no one is certain in what manner or even whether or not Beach Poker Room or any other poker operator can play poker, that strongly suggests these laws are too ambiguous and problematic to be of use to anyone,” Solares said.

Solares worked closely with charitable gaming regulators due to her position on the state board. She’s also currently running for the Virginia Beach School Board as a Republican and has received donations from Sen. Bill DeSteph, Del. Glenn Davis, and Del. Tim Anderson.

The group behind the Beach Poker Room applied for a poker license last year under the corporate name 2 G’s Business Inc. State records show the corporation’s status as “pending inactive” because of an overdue annual report.

‘We just need the existing legislation enforced’

Virginia has significantly relaxed its formerly strict stance on gambling over the last four years, and some feel there’s no harm in people getting together to play cards with money on the line. But there’s widespread agreement the state needs coherent gambling laws and someone making sure they’re followed, and many see the latest poker room twist as another sign of failure on that front.

“I don’t think we need new legislation; we just need the existing legislation enforced,” said Sen. John Bell, D-Loudoun, who sponsored this year’s bill that shut down all poker rooms temporarily. “I will be working with a bipartisan group of legislators who will ask the governor, attorney general, and commonwealth’s attorneys to ensure the current laws are enforced.”

The casinos that will offer poker games in Virginia are governed by a lengthy set of regulations and a licensing process overseen by the Virginia Lottery. The state has no regulations in effect for standalone charity poker rooms, but VDACS is working on creating them.

Some would-be poker operators in Virginia have tried to exploit the legal gray area between games of chance and games of skill, where the player’s talent and aptitude determines the outcome. A 2013 legal challenge attempting to exempt poker from the state’s illegal gambling law, which bans certain unsanctioned games of chance, failed after the Portsmouth Circuit Court ruled the law was not unconstitutionally vague. The Supreme Court of Virginia upheld that ruling without resolving the skill versus chance question. If authorities were to crack down on the Beach Poker Room, it could create a new opening to try to legalize poker through the courts.

Past prosecutions

In the past, it seemed clear anyone trying to make money from underground poker games was breaking the law.

Fairfax County police made headlines in 2015 when heavily armed officers raided a high-stakes poker game happening in the basement of a private home in Great Falls. A 2011 poker raid in Virginia Beach led to criminal charges against the man accused of running the games out of a house across the street from the seafood buffet he owned. He faced up to 30 years in prison but agreed to a plea deal that came with a two-year suspended sentence, a $5,000 fine, and the forfeiture of nearly $275,000 in cash and gambling equipment, according to the Virginian-Pilot.

“It has been this office’s position that poker is a game of chance, and we have prosecuted illegal gambling cases in the past,” said Macie Allen, a spokesperson for Virginia Beach Commonwealth’s Attorney Colin Stolle. “If the Virginia Beach Police Department brings us evidence of illegal gambling, we will evaluate it and take appropriate action.”

When asked about the Beach Poker Room, a Virginia Beach police spokesperson said the department was “looking into the matter.” Last year, the Richmond Free Press reported that Richmond police officers were doing off-duty security work at a similar bingo hall/poker room in South Richmond. The Virginia Beach police spokesperson didn’t immediately answer when asked if officers are doing similar work at the Bingo Palace/Beach Poker Room.

The fight over charitable poker rules

Virginia legalized charity Texas Hold ’em poker tournaments in 2020 as a way to boost a declining charitable gaming industry best known for bingo halls. Charitable gaming operators were also looking to expand into new areas and to protect their turf in anticipation of several casinos opening in the state that will offer poker and other table games.

The rollout of state-sanctioned poker, long considered a form of illegal gambling, quickly turned into a contentious dispute between the Charitable Gaming Board, run largely by industry insiders who stood to profit from poker, and the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, which regulates charitable gaming.

Agency officials felt the board was overstepping by writing poker regulations to maximize the industry’s revenue and minimize state oversight. A major concern was the lack of clear separation among charities, for-profit poker operators, and landlords who charge them rent, a setup state officials have said is susceptible to financial conflicts of interest and corruption.

Charitable Gaming Board Chairman Chuck Lessin, who opened an unlicensed poker room at his South Richmond bingo hall last year but closed it this summer to comply with the new law, accused VDACS of undermining the board’s authority and working to block the board-approved regulations from taking effect. Lessin has argued the General Assembly is taking a harsher line on small-scale charitable gaming operators to clear out competition for the big out-of-state companies opening casinos in Virginia.

The General Assembly largely sided with VDACS in 2021 by passing legislation to freeze charitable poker altogether. Several poker rooms opened anyway, despite none of them being officially licensed or regulated by VDACS.

This year, legislators took a harder stance, passing a new bill threatening poker operators with crippling fines, a move meant to stop all unlicensed games until VDACS could craft a new set of regulations and start issuing licenses.

The lawsuit this summer was an attempt to block that law from going into effect, with Petersen arguing the state was hurting charities like Virginia Beach’s Billy the Kidden cat rescue by legalizing charitable poker but refusing to give out licenses for it.

Krizek, who led a General Assembly committee that scrutinized the charitable gaming industry last year, said he’s hoping the situation improves soon, with the Virginia State Police expected to fill a gaming enforcement coordinator position the legislature created this year. But he said he’s worried “the clock is ticking.”

“When more and more of these illegal gambling dens pop up, the harder it’s going to be,” Krizek said. “It’s going to be like whack-a-mole trying to get rid of them all.”

by Graham Moomaw, Virginia Mercury


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Ian remnants to arrive in Virginia today and more state headlines

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The state Capitol. (Ned Oliver/ Virginia Mercury)

• The rain from what’s left of Hurricane Ian will arrive in Virginia today. Forecasters say the storm could also bring some flooding and strong winds.—Cardinal News, Virginian-Pilot, Washington Post

• Gov. Glenn Youngkin seemed to commit to serving his full four-year term in an appearance on CNBC, but his office clarified that’s not what he meant.—Richmond Times-Dispatch

• Republican Del. Marie March is feuding with Pulaski County officials over zoning rules for a barn she’s using as an event venue.—Cardinal News


• The U.S. House of Representatives appears unlikely to take up a proposed ban on stock trading by members before the midterms. “It seems like it’s been a punt, after punt, after punt,” said Rep. Abigail Spanberger, who’s championed a ban.—Business Insider

• Richmond is moving closer to removing its last remaining Confederate monument. It’s a more delicate task, one now in the hands of a judge because it’s also the burial site for general A.P. Hill.—Richmond Times-Dispatch

• A Winchester judge temporarily blocked portions of a gun ordinance banning firearms in public parks, and at permitted public events, a decision gun-rights groups applauded as a step toward “fully dismantling this law.”—Winchester Star

• Federal officials released a project scoring system that could determine whether the new FBI headquarters is built in Virginia or Maryland.—WTOP

• A pilot program meant to reduce evictions in Virginia showed promising results, according to VCU researchers.—VPM

• George Mason University is offsetting a tuition increase with credits for in-state undergraduates as Youngkin pushes to keep college costs level.—Washington Post

• A Woodstock man won the giant pumpkin competition at the Virginia State Fair with a 756-pounder.—Northern Virginia Daily

by Staff Report, Virginia Mercury


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Attorney General Miyares secures four indictments of unemployment compensation fraud

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In March, the Virginia Employment Commission asked Attorney General Jason Miyares to help prosecute fraudulent claims for unemployment compensation. In response, the Attorney General created an Unemployment Compensation Fraud Unit to handle these cases and protect Virginians.

To date, the unit has produced four sets of indictments, as follows;

Britanny Anderson; Lynchburg: one count of felony obtaining money by false pretense (Va. Code sec. 18.2-178), one count of misdemeanor computer fraud (Va. Code sec. 18.2-152.3), and three counts of misdemeanor false statement to obtain/increase benefits (Va. Code sec. 60.2-632).

Susan Banks, Culpeper: one count of felony obtaining money by false pretense (Va. Code sec. 18.2-178), one count of felony conspiracy to commit larceny (Va. Code sec. 18.2-22/18.2-178), and one count of misdemeanor computer fraud (Va. Code sec. 18.2-152.3).


Bryant Banks, Culpeper: one count of felony obtaining money by false pretense (Va. Code sec. 18.2-178) and one count of felony conspiracy to commit larceny (Va. Code sec. 18.2-22/18.2-178).

Vo Long, Culpeper: one count of felony obtaining money by false pretense (Va. Code sec. 18.2-178) and one count of felony conspiracy to commit larceny (Va. Code sec. 18.2-22/18.2-178).

The Office of the Attorney General has no further comment as these cases are open and ongoing.

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Attorney General ­­­­Miyares asks the Supreme Court to uphold law that prohibits encouraging people to break U.S. Immigration Laws

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Attorney General Miyares has joined an amicus brief asking the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) to uphold an important federal statute used to enforce immigration laws in United States v. Hansen.

“We’re in the middle of a crisis on our Southern Border. Fentanyl and other illegal substances from the cartels are invading our communities and ravaging families in Virginia and in every corner of our country. Now, more than ever, we need to enforce our immigration laws and secure our border,” said Attorney General Miyares. “This statute simply says that individuals cannot encourage others to break existing immigration law. It’s common sense.”

In 2017, a grand jury charged California resident Helaman Hansen with multiple crimes for scamming hundreds of noncitizens out of more than $1 million by deceptively promising them a path to citizenship that did not exist. He was charged under a federal statute for encouraging migrants to come to the U.S. illegally for purposes of commercial advantage or private financial gain. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals then struck down the statute on the grounds that the law’s words, “encourage” and “induce,” are too broad.

The coalition argues that the Ninth Circuit’s decision jeopardizes the constitutionality of similarly-worded criminal laws in all 50 states and emphasizes that the flawed decision could invite state and federal courts to invalidate longstanding criminal laws.


Attorney General Miyares is joined by the attorneys general of Arizona, Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

Read the amicus here.

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Flood Fund future uncertain as Youngkin pushes for carbon market withdrawal

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In January, strong winds led to high tides drowning parts of Hampton. Some roads were impassable, with water levels rising to near the top tread of the tires. Almost two years prior, stormwater had led to flooding severe enough to sweep parked cars down the roadways.

With climate change driving sea levels up and altering rainfall patterns, Hampton is certain to continue to be hit by flooding. What’s less certain is where it will get funding to combat it.

Over the past two years, Virginia has accumulated over $200 million for flood protection from the state’s participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. But the future of that funding pool is in doubt as Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin has made it clear he wants to leave the initiative.

Gov. Glenn Youngkin. (Ned Oliver / Virginia Mercury)


“RGGI is a bad deal for Virginia,” said Travis Voyles, acting secretary of natural and historic resources, when he outlined the administration’s plans for withdrawing Virginia from RGGI at the end of last month.

RGGI is the 11-state cap-and-invest program in which energy producers must buy allowances at auction for the carbon they emit, and a cap is placed on overall carbon emissions.

The proceeds of those auctions are returned to the state. In Virginia, half is directed to low-income energy efficiency programs, while 45% goes toward the Community Flood Preparedness Fund, a pool of money that provides flood assistance to communities and local governments.

Including the latest sale of allowances on Sept. 7, Virginia has received some $452 million from RGGI, meaning $203 million will go toward flood resiliency efforts.

Local flood protection

Whether flooding occurs on Virginia’s coast from sea level rise or in its inland areas from rainfall increases, the impacts are real, said Skip Stiles, executive director of Wetlands Watch, a Norfolk-based nonprofit working to address sea level rise adaptation, floodplain management, and other waterway impacts.

Before Virginia joined RGGI in 2020 — a Democratic priority during the party’s brief period in power — flood protection was left up to local and regional planning bodies, with no central pool of funds governments could draw from. Since the state joined, the Department of Conservation and Recreation, which administers the Flood Fund, has begun paying out grants from the revenues.

“Before Virginia joined RGGI, there were ZERO state dollars going toward these resilience efforts,” said Stiles in an email.

Any state spending on these efforts through the Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program, Virginia Sea Grant or the Virginia Department of Emergency Management used money derived from federal agencies, he said.

“We have to assume that if we leave RGGI, we will return to that low-priority status for this work,” Stiles said.

The Flood Fund has proved to be “absolutely helpful” to combat problems linked to climate change, particularly stormwater issues and sea level rise, said City of Hampton Resiliency Officer Carolyn Heaps-Pecaro.

“We have a lot of projects lined up,” she said. “We have a lot of ideas for how to fix the town. We need that money to actually make them a reality.”

Hampton was the largest recipient of the second round of grants announced in December from the proceeds, receiving about a third of the $24.5 million the Flood Fund paid out. The projects that were funded included plans for elevating a roadway, improving drainage canals, and reducing nutrient pollution.

Millions in local funding is needed to complete the projects, but the state funds help cover design and engineering costs to begin them, Heaps-Pecaro said.

“Several of these projects probably would not have moved forward nearly as quickly as they did had we not received the grant funding,” she said.

Flood Fund dollars also go toward projects outside of coastal areas. In the first round of grants, announced in October 2021, $400,000 was awarded to Buchanan County. 

The Southwestern Virginia locality had been slammed with devastating floods the prior August. The region also suffered severe flooding this July and, according to a Thursday morning update from the National Hurricane Center and Central Pacific Hurricane Center, could lie in the pathway of Hurricane Ian.

The Buchanan funding is intended to go toward an engineering analysis that would lead to a local flood resilience plan and training for a staff member to become a certified floodplain manager.

A quarter of Flood Fund dollars need to go to low-income communities, a designation Buchanan qualifies for, with a median income that in 2019 was less than half of the state’s average.

“Buchanan County and our neighbors in Southwest Virginia have experienced devastating recurrent flooding that has increased in recent years,” the county’s application stated. “Flooding is often thought of as a coastal problem, but we are pleased to see that DCR seeks to direct some of this fund to mountainous and disadvantaged communities such as ours.”

An unclear future

While Youngkin has been adamant that he believes Virginia should withdraw from RGGI, the administration’s plans for how the state will help local governments pay for the massive flood protection costs are less clear.

Youngkin has argued for months that RGGI proceeds are being generated from an unfair “tax” on electric utility ratepayers. Virginia utilities responsible for about three-quarters of the carbon emissions subject to RGGI are allowed to pass on the cost of buying allowances to their customers, an approach Youngkin says is flawed.

“RGGI was sold to Commonwealth residents as a deal that returned the ‘proceeds’ to the ratepayers to offset the costs of the program, but that is not what is happening,” a statement from the governor’s office to the Mercury said. “We can provide funding for flood resiliency in a transparent way without using an RGGI tax on Virginians.”

Youngkin’s office said the administration intends to develop a plan to provide direct funding for flood resiliency with the General Assembly. That would require buy-in from Senate Democrats.

But when pressed for specifics of the plan, such as whether it will be crafted through legislation or the budget process, which can involve fluctuating revenues and regular competition among different interests competing for a piece of the pie, the governor’s office didn’t clarify beyond saying it will “provide direct funding and coordination for flood resiliency.”

“We can do this in a way that is transparent and not a hidden tax that was misrepresented to Virginians,” the governor’s office stated. “This will ensure we have a long-term comprehensive strategy to sustain flood resilience efforts in Virginia.”

Millions of dollars remain uncommitted

Even while the future of the Flood Fund remains uncertain, millions of dollars remain on its books.

Before leaving office, Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration awarded two rounds of grants in the last three months of 2021 equal to $32.3 million.

The third round of $13.6 million was announced Wednesday, nine months into Youngkin’s term.

Flood Fund oversight to remain with executive branch 

Round 3 was initially advertised to award $40 million, but with applications requesting nearly $93 million, DCR said it has been authorized to release an additional $30 million. The agency allows 32 applicants to revise and resubmit their proposals and plans to decide on them by the end of the year.

If DCR awards all $70 million it’s been authorized to grant during the third round, Virginia will have spent about 50% of its Flood Fund revenues to date, with just over $100 million left to be designated.

A DCR spokesperson said plans for that unused funding include “future grant rounds as well as loan opportunities going forward.” A fourth application round is expected to be opened in early 2023, along with the first round of the newly created Resilient Virginia Revolving Loan Fund, which will provide loans or grants for resilience to local governments and residents.

Increasing climate impacts

Stiles pointed to data from Carnegie Mellon University, the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, and the RAND Corporation showing that rainfall intensity has increased an average of 18% since 2006.

Increased rainfall in the state has been documented for years, and the Virginia Coastal Resilience Master Plan projects that between 2020 and 2080, the number of residents living in homes exposed to major coastal flooding will grow from approximately 360,000 to 943,000, an increase of 160%. The report also found that more residential, public, and commercial buildings will be exposed to extreme coastal flooding, while annualized flood damages will increase from $0.4 to $5.1 billion.

Moreover, a recent Climate Central study found that rising water levels on land reduce the amount of property local governments can tax.

“Climate change isn’t going away,” Heaps-Pecaro stated. “We have to accelerate” the fight against it.

by Charlie Paullin, Virginia Mercury


Virginia Mercury is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Virginia Mercury maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Sarah Vogelsong for questions: info@virginiamercury.com. Follow Virginia Mercury on Facebook and Twitter.

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Attorney General Miyares announces state price gouging protections in effect ahead of potentially hazardous weather from Hurricane Ian

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As Virginia prepares for strong wind and heavy rainfall due to Hurricane Ian, Attorney General Jason Miyares is announcing today that Governor Glenn Youngkin’s declaration of a state of emergency has triggered Virginia’s anti-price gouging statutes designed to protect consumers from paying exorbitant prices for necessities during an emergency event.

“In addition to making smart decisions and keeping up with news developments during a statewide emergency declaration, Virginians must also support each other during this potentially hazardous time,” said Attorney General Miyares. “Any violations of Virginia’s Anti-Price Gouging Act or exploitation of Virginians’ wallets will be thoroughly prosecuted through the Virginia Consumer Protection Act by my office. Bad actors will be held accountable.”

Established in 2004, Virginia’s Anti-Price Gouging Act prohibits a supplier from charging “unconscionable prices” for “necessary goods and services” during the thirty-day period following a declared emergency. Items and services covered by these protections include, but are not limited to, water, ice, food, generators, batteries, home repair materials and services, and tree removal services. The basic test for determining if a price is unconscionable is whether the post-disaster price grossly exceeds the price charged for the same or similar goods or services during the ten days immediately before the disaster.

Virginia’s Anti-Price Gouging Act Violations are enforceable by the Office of the Attorney General through the Virginia Consumer Protection Act. Complaints should be reported for investigation to the Office of the Attorney General Consumer Protection Section, with the exception of claims related to gasoline and motor fuel prices, which are handled by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.


Consumers can contact Attorney General Miyares’ Consumer Protection Section for additional information or to file a complaint:

· By phone: (800)-552-9963

· By email: consumer@oag.state.va.us

· Online Complaint Form

More information can be found at www.oag.state.va.us/consumer-protection/.

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Oct 9 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
The Farmer’s Forge @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. The forge is fired up and the blacksmiths are hard at work in the Historic Area. Members of the Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac have set up shop and are ready to show[...]
Oct
10
Mon
11:00 am Fall Farm Days: Life on the Farm @ Sky Meadows State Park
Fall Farm Days: Life on the Farm @ Sky Meadows State Park
Oct 10 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Fall Farm Days: Life on the Farm @ Sky Meadows State Park
Historic Area. Come back to the family farm at Sky Meadows. Explore the park’s sustainable farming practices, visit the barred plymouth rock hens, learn about our cattle operation in partnership with the Department of Corrections’[...]
6:30 pm Bethel Life Revival 2022 @ Bethel Assembly of God
Bethel Life Revival 2022 @ Bethel Assembly of God
Oct 10 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Bethel Life Revival 2022 @ Bethel Assembly of God
Please join us on October 9th at 10:30am and October 10th-12th at 6:30pm nightly for a special series of services with Johan Bruwer. Johan is from Bloemfontein, South Africa, and will deliver a very inspiring[...]