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Town asked ‘permitted to do what’ along Happy Creek’s banks?

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Over the past few weeks, Royal Examiner received a number of citizen inquiries about what appeared to be “clearcutting” work along the banks of Happy Creek between Commerce Avenue and Front Street. This stretch of the creek parallels the Royal Shenandoah Greenway from the Prospect Street Bridge to South Street in the Town of Front Royal.

In response to these inquiries, Royal Examiner attempted to contact the Town’s Public Works Director Robbie Boyer on Thursday, November 5. Information provided to Royal Examiner included two permits, one from the Virginia Marine Resources Commission, dated October 7, 2020, generically addressed to a Town Post Office Box, and a second addressed to Boyer from the US Army Corps of Engineers, dated October 29, 2010, several days after the project was already underway.

The first permit stated, “Permittee is hereby authorized to clear vegetation and sediment accumulation and to restore (emphasis added) and stabilize 1,300 linear feet of Happy Creek between East Prospect and South Streets in the Town of Front Royal, Virginia, and Warren County. All activities authorized herein shall be accomplished in conformance with ‘the plans and drawings dated and revised August 25, 2020, which’ are attached and made a part of this permit.”

Jay Woodward, Environmental Engineer with the Virginia Marine Resources Commission confirmed in an email dated November 5, 2020, “Please keep in mind VMRC jurisdiction is limited to the submerged lands below the elevation of Ordinary High Water in Happy Creek itself, not the banks and floodplain above (emphasis added).”

A graphic from Town application submitted by consultant CHA to state agencies. Royal Examiner Photos by Roger Bianchini

The concern expressed to Royal Examiner by interested citizens was how “clearcutting” shrubs and small trees from a creek bank contribute to stabilizing that bank? It would certainly seem counter-intuitive that clearing established vegetation from Happy Creek’s banks would stabilize those banks.

While awaiting a call back from Boyer we gave Interim Town Manager Matt Tederick a try as 5 o’clock approached. After leaving a message we heard back from Tederick after business hours late Thursday afternoon. Tederick explained Boyer had been in meetings with him much of the afternoon. Tederick confirmed that Public Works was doing the Happy Creek stabilization and stormwater management project and urged patience from citizens alarmed by the initial appearance of the creek bank in the early stages of the project. He reiterated the plan not to remove trees with a trunk circumference greater than 4 inches and disputed the term “clearcutting” being applied to the work.
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“I understand the sentiment,” Tederick said of citizen concern over the project’s initial appearance. “But we got a DEQ Consent Order and obtained all the same permits and are following the same procedures we did on Eighth Street near Bing Crosby Stadium. We were asked to extend the work on Happy Creek to South Street. People are seeing the initial stage – it’s not clearcutting.”

Above, looking northeast on Nov. 5 from the Front St. side of Happy Creek toward the Prospect St. Bridge and Commerce Ave.; below, the view south from the same spot. No replanting of removed vegetation is planned and large rocks will replace that vegetation as part of a stormwater management plan.

But in addition to clearing fallen trees and other debris out of the creek bed, vegetation is being cleared above the water level to be replaced by “rip-rap” or large stones that will help address past flooding issues on East Main and Water Streets near the creek to the north of Prospect Street – “It will be beautiful,” Tederick assured us, though adding that no replanting was planned where vegetation has been removed.

A divergent opinion

Royal Examiner also spoke with someone we know to have expertise in such matters, local Tree Steward official, past Town Urban Forestry Commission member, and Urban Forester/Environmental Scientist David Means. Means was aware of the work and expressed the opinion that what was being done along Happy Creek’s banks in town did appear contrary to established creek or riverbank stabilization principals.

He cited recommendations from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources’ regarding riparian buffers, stating, “We recommend avoidance of (removing) as much established native vegetation, including trees, as possible as they provide streambank stabilization, stream shading, and leaf litter which are important aspects of aquatic habitat.”

Means also said that measurements taken at the work site indicated stumps from more than 100 trees exceeding a diameter of four inches. – “Trees up to 13 inches in diameter have been cut down, exposing the greenway to the noise and views of busy Commerce Avenue,” Means asserted, adding, “These include trees donated by individuals and organizations to commemorate Arbor Day and enabling the Town to qualify for ‘Tree City USA’ status.

Above, part of the bank in question prior to the mid-October start of flood management work. Below, picking up trees and brush after clearing work began in mid-October. Courtesy Photos Tree Stewards

Of earlier Town work on the creek Means observed, “Between 2007 and 2010, the Town received two state grants to meet these specifications, one for installation of rock structures to reduce the velocity of the water, limit erosion, and create trout habitat. Native trees and shrubs were planted as well to create the shade and cool waters required by trout. The second grant, from the Department of Forestry, underwrote removal of invasive species from the riparian buffer zone.”

As for the current work, Means said he reviewed the Town’s permits and application materials, finding several deficiencies. “The application lacked a site-specific erosion and sediment control plan, specifications for the proposed work, a tree preservation plan, and restoration plan. All the application says is that the work will be done, with no specifics on materials, or method of installation – the detail is missing. The permit addresses ‘Happy Creek Streambank and Channel Restoration’ but work in progress is geared toward stormwater management and flood control, in which case the plan should have included an engineer’s calculations based on two-and 10-year storm events, upstream impervious surfaces, flow and velocity calculations supporting the intended design.”

Recommendations from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources regarding riparian buffers appear to be ignored in the Town’s work and plans, most pointedly, “restoring original streambed and streambank contours, revegetating barren areas with native vegetation, and implementing strict erosion and sediment control measures. We recommend that instream work be designed and performed in a manner that minimizes impacts upon natural streamflow and movement of resident aquatic species … To minimize harm to the aquatic environment and its residents … We (VDWR) recommend adherence to erosion and sediment controls during ground disturbance. We recommend use of native species for all plantings. We recommend alternatives to the creation of a hardened shoreline as such areas can prohibit access to aquatic habitats along stream margins” (emphasis added)”.

However, by the interim town manager’s own admission, there is no planned replanting and a “hardened shoreline” is exactly the intended endgame.

Above, the view north, and below, south at result of previous work at Eighth St. Bridge along Happy Creek’s bank. There is dispute that this end result is what the Town has been permitted for by state agencies between Prospect St. and South St. along the Greenway path.

In providing rationale for the work, Tederick referenced flooding in the Water-East Main Street area in the late 1990s. Means believes the proposed design would possibly exacerbate flooding problems, increasing velocity and volume to impact property downstream, particularly at the creek’s intersection with East Main, Stonewall, and Prospect Streets. Noting more recent federal moves prohibiting most floodplain construction, Means questioned the wisdom of past permitting in the creek’s floodplain on Water Street and nearby.

Means held a Virginia Erosion and Sediment Control Inspectors Certificate for nine years while employed by a design/build engineering company in Northern Virginia. Based on his observations of Happy Creek’s banks over a period of years, “Prior to this project, the banks appeared to be naturally stable, due to vegetation that actually reduced velocity and associated streambank erosion,” he reasoned.

Growing concern

On Friday, November 6, the Tree Stewards met with several interested parties to discuss concerns with the work. Invitees included the Urban Forestry Advisory Commission, Beautification of Front Royal Committee, Shenandoah Valley Alliance, and Appalachian Trail Community network. A joint letter of concern will be submitted to the Town, Means indicated.|

On the same day, Means met by phone with County Board of Supervisors Chairman Walt Mabe, who reported that County Building Official David Beahm had “shut the project down last Thursday, October 29.” However, Means documented crews continuing to cut trees down as recently as Wednesday, November 3.

According to Tederick, work began in mid-October, apparently between October 19 and 22. Contacted Friday, Tederick said he was unaware of any Stop Order on the project. He said that Beahm had contacted the Town regarding submission of an Erosion and Sediment Control Plan, which the town manager said had been submitted, and that work was continuing as planned.

We were unable to contact Beahm prior to the end of the workweek. Royal Examiner will continue to follow this developing story.

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EDA in Focus

EDA announces pending sale of Baugh Drive warehouse to medical marijuana distributor

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The EDA Board of Directors met in a Special Board meeting this morning. With a unanimous vote on a motion by Greg Harold, seconded by Jim Wolfe, the Board approved a resolution authorizing the Chair and Secretary to sign a Letter Of Intent (LOI) to sell the former Atlantic Skyline Building at 426 Baugh Drive for the full asking price of $5,750,000 to Parallel Virginia, LLC, a pharmaceutical processor of medical cannabis. The sale is contingent upon the conditional approval of the company’s application for a pharmaceutical processor permit in Health Service Area 1 by the Virginia Board of Pharmacy – a decision expected in March 2021. As authorized by law, the Virginia Board of Pharmacy may award conditional approval for only one pharmaceutical processor application in this health service area.

The Commonwealth of Virginia passed legislation approving the production and use of medical cannabis oil in 2018. The legislation established five Health Service Areas with one pharmaceutical processor per area. The Board of Pharmacy has already awarded permits in Areas 2-5. The Area 1 permit reopened for applicants in the fall of 2020.

Parallel Virginia, LLC, if awarded conditional approval, will begin establishing its manufacturing presence in the spring of 2021. This experienced, multi-state operator is already successfully operating in four states – Georgia, Massachusetts, Colorado, and Florida. In addition, the company is currently developing a recently awarded research-focused operation in Pennsylvania in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh.

Parallel has a strong research and development component in every operation and has already signed letters of intent for strategic research and workforce partnerships with several public and private Virginia institutions of higher education.

The company’s industry-leading experience and multi-state success will greatly benefit the Warren County and Front Royal area. In the first five years of operation, they project a capital investment of tens of millions of dollars and the creation of hundreds of jobs.

Virginia law requires doctors who want to write prescriptions for medical cannabis to register with the Board of Pharmacy. Patients prescribed medical cannabis are required to pay an annual fee in addition to the cost of the prescription. The law also limits the number of dispensing facilities within the Health Service Area to five. The company, if selected, will establish its pharmaceutical processor operation at this facility, and has future plans to identify separate, stand-alone dispensing facilities within other localities in HSA 1.

Aerial perspective of the 426 Baugh Dr. warehouse – photo, graphic courtesy of WCEDA

Finally, selling the building will save Warren County taxpayers approximately $25,000 per month, or $300,000 a year, in loan payments, utilities, and insurance costs. It was a priority of the Board to get this building back into the hands of the private sector and back online creating jobs and adding to the economic engine of our community. This prospect will create jobs, generate tax revenue, and develop licensed medicine for patients in need. Doug Parsons, EDA Executive Director noted, “We believe this company is a good fit for our community. They have been thorough, transparent, and accommodating in thinking through their potential presence in Virginia. We appreciate their interest in our community and their commitment to making a lasting, positive impact in our region.”

Also following the closed session, on a motion by Tom Patteson, seconded by Harold, the board unanimously approved a short-term storage lease with Interchange Group for 10,000 square feet of space at 426 Baugh Drive for $4,125 per month.

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Rotary Club of Front Royal providing free Doc Smith food boxes and Coats for Kids

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The Rotary Club of Front Royal is partnering with the Department of Social Services to provide free Doc Smith food boxes and Coats for Kids. The Doc Smith Food Basket program has existed in Warren County/Front Royal since 1916. The Rotary Club of Front Royal has sponsored the food box program since 2003.

The deadline for applications is Monday, November 30. Applications can be dropped off at the following places:

  • Department of Social Services – 465 W 15th St (they have a drop box for contactless delivery)
  • Warren County Community Center – 538 Villa Ave – Friday and Saturday, November 20 and 21
  • Drop box at First Baptist Church -14 W 1st Street (in doors facing 1st Avenue)
  • Call or email First Baptist Church – 540-635-2122 or fbaptistfr@comcast.net

Food boxes and coats can be picked up on Saturday, December 19, from 10:00am – Noon, at First Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. Delivery is also available.

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Traditional Thanksgiving off the table for many

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Many Americans are grappling with ways to make one of the nation’s most celebrated holidays safe amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Richmond resident Caroline Kaschak will feast at home to protect at-risk elders in her family.

“It is just going to be my husband and me,” Kaschak said. “We are going to order in fancy takeout instead.”

Colleges like Virginia Commonwealth University are offering COVID-19 exit testing to students before they return home for the holidays. Some Americans still have scheduled traditional Thanksgiving gatherings with their families.

“I plan on going to my grandparents’ house for Thanksgiving,” said VCU student Rickaya Sykes. “They live in the same town as me, and we are very close. If I am not at home, I am at their house spending time with them.”

The Centers for Disease Control recently issued guidance for gatherings over the Thanksgiving holiday. The safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving is at home with people who live in the same household, the CDC said. Gatherings with family and friends who live outside the home can increase the chances of getting or spreading COVID-19 or the flu.

The agency recommends that hosts limit the number of guests, disinfect surfaces and keep windows open to decrease coronavirus risk. For attendees, the guidance includes bringing and eating food from home with their own utensils and staying out of the kitchen.

COVID-19 cases and deaths have sharply risen in the past two weeks across the nation and in Virginia, according to the New York Times. Over the past week, there has been an average of 2,262 new cases per day in Virginia, an increase of 62% from the average two weeks earlier, according to the Times.

Gov. Ralph Northam announced a coronavirus mandate in Virginia to limit private gatherings and some public events to 25 people. The restrictions took effect on Nov. 15, less than two weeks before the Thanksgiving holiday.

The CDC urged Americans to consider alternative Thanksgiving Day activities such as virtual celebrations, eating meals outdoors, post-holiday shopping online and using a curbside pickup.

Virginia State Parks is encouraging families to gather at its 39 parks— which have remained open during the pandemic—over the Thanksgiving holiday. The “Opt Outside” promotion will be celebrated throughout the holiday weekend from Nov. 26 to Nov. 29. Visitors have a chance to win a $500 Virginia State Parks gift certificate if they submit up to five photos of their trip and enter it into the annual photo contest. The Virginia State Parks promotion started 10 years ago as “Green Friday” to motivate families to visit the park instead of post-Thanksgiving shopping on “Black Friday.”

“Since the promotion started, we have seen more people visiting parks over the holidays,” said Tim Shrader, the eastern region field operations manager for Virginia State Parks. “You have all this family coming in, you probably need to get outside and enjoy each other’s company outside for physical and mental health.”

AAA released its annual Thanksgiving travel forecast, which anticipated at least a 10% drop in travel. The agency said that is the largest one-year decrease since the Great Recession in 2008. In mid-October, AAA expected up to 50 million Americans to travel for the holiday. Now they say it could be lowered given the recent surge in COVID-19 cases and health notices.

The nation’s airports saw an uptick in travelers over the weekend, despite the CDC advisory to avoid traveling. The Transportation Security Administration reported almost 4 million travelers from Nov. 19 to Nov. 22, but the rate of travelers was still much lower than at the same time last year.

By India Jones
Capital News Service

Capital News Service is a program of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Robertson School of Media and Culture. Students in the program provide state government coverage for a variety of media outlets in Virginia.

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FRPD releases Chief’s full statement on social media investigation

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The Front Royal Police Department was made aware on Wednesday, November 11, 2020, of concerning social media posts that had been made by an officer within our department. These comments do not represent the views of the Town of Front Royal or our Police Department. Our mission remains to safeguard the lives of ALL members of our community. We take this behavior very seriously. Upon receipt of the complaint, the officer was immediately placed on administrative leave pursuant to an internal investigation.

The Internal Affairs Division conducted a thorough investigation, the results of which were also vetted externally by a third party. It was determined in the investigation that the Front Royal Police Department’s General Order 27.01.04; Public Information – Internet / Social Media had been violated by this employee. Specific violations include: ‘D.3 – Department Sanctioned Use’, and section ‘E. – Personal Use/Off-Duty Conduct’. In light of the totality of circumstances, appropriate punitive and corrective disciplinary actions have taken place which includes extensive training in cultural diversity, anti-biased policing, and the role of social media in public safety.

The officer is a 15-year veteran of the Front Royal Police Department. All 15 years of performance evaluations show above average work performance. In the past three years alone, this officer has responded to over 3,000 calls for service in our community. This officer has never had any disciplinary actions, no citizen complaints, and no excessive use of force incidents in the course of his career.

Again, we take this very seriously and do not condone the statements made by this officer. We are instituting social media training for the entire department and will be conducting antibias policing training in addition to the mandated yearly cultural diversity requirements of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services.

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Steven Hicks to start as Front Royal Town Manager on December 7th, 2020

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Steven Hicks – New Front Royal Town Manager

The Front Royal Town Council is proud to announce the selection of Steven Hicks as the new Town Manager. Hicks will assume the position Monday, December 7th.

Mayor Eugene Tewalt stated, “I know I speak for Council that we could not be more pleased to have Steven serve as our Town Manager and thankful for Matt who filled in as Interim during our Town Manager search.”

Vice-Mayor Bill Sealock said, “Finding the right candidate took longer than we expected. The Council knew what they wanted in a manager and was patient to find the right Town Manager for our community. I believe our efforts have paid off by having the best candidate possible. I’m excited to see what Steven will bring to our Town government, businesses, and community.” Mayor-elect, Chris Holloway commented, “Hicks was selected because of his impressive leadership in operations, bringing business in communities, developing fiscally conservative budgets, managing enterprise departments, and delivering complex infrastructure projects on-time and on-budget.”

“I am honored and appreciate the confidence the Front Royal Town Council has in me to lead and be part of a great organization,” said Hicks. “My daughters are excited to become part of the community while they go to college and for me to be part of the Front Royal team to serve the citizens and businesses.”

Hicks has over 25 years of state and local government experience. He was previously the Town Manager of Selma, NC that provided a full range of services including Solid Waste, Water, Sewer, and Electric, as well as Police and Fire. During Hicks tenure, he was able to develop a transparent operational budget and manage the Town’s enterprise funds delivering positive operating revenue. As part of the budget process, Hicks was able to establish Selma’s first-ever 5-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) with major emphasis in addressing groundwater and stormwater (I&I) that enters into the Town’s sewer system for treatment. Hicks also partnered with Eastfield Crossing Developers and Duke Energy to amend the 400-acre mixed-used development and incentive agreement to increase the Town’s tax base and create 3,100 jobs.

Prior to that position, Hicks was the General Services Director for the City of Durham, NC. He created the Division of Arts, Culture, and Sustainable Communities to cover the social, economic, and environmental wellbeing to empower citizens to advance equity, inclusion, and equal access to opportunities and services. While serving as a Director, he was responsible for a $300 million infrastructure program that included capital investments for parking garages, two fire stations, parks, and a new police headquarters and emergency communication center. He also worked in Virginia as the Petersburg’s Public Works and Utility Director, Acting Assistant James City County Administrator, and Williamsburg Resident Engineer for the Virginia Department of Transportation.

While in James City County, Hicks had an impressive record with the business community where he oversaw the Planning and Development Services. He established a business-friendly “One-Stop-Shop” where citizens and the development community were able to get administrative site plan approval within one-business-day.

“I understand the frustration, time, and money it takes to accomplish a home improvement project or a straightforward development. The business-friendly approach I delivered ensured the County’s approval process did not outsmart common sense and expedited approvals for the citizens and business community who expected and deserved it,” says Hicks.

Hicks has a Master of Science Degree in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering (USE) from George Mason University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Urban Studies from Virginia  Commonwealth University. He is a graduate of the University of Virginia Darden School Senior Executive Institute, the University of North Carolina School of Government Municipal and County Administration, and the Virginia Tech Transportation Construction Management Institute. He served as the Commissioner of North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency, Triangle East Chamber of Commerce Board of Director, and Uptown Selma Business Partnership Board Director. He is a member of the International City Management Association and North Carolina League of Municipalities. Hicks was a former member of the Virginia Municipal League.

Matt Tederick began working as the Interim Town Manager in November 2019. Matt has agreed to assist Steven as part of the transition. Tederick concluded, “To date, I have had a very limited time getting to know Steven, but this much I have already observed, he appears to be the perfect selection for our Town. Well done Town Council.”

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Town Talk: A conversation with William Huck – 2nd Annual Turkey Egg Hunt and more

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The first-ever Turkey Egg Hunt in Front Royal last year was a big success. William Huck of C&C Frozen Treats says to look for the 2nd Annual Turkey Egg Hunt to be even bigger and better. In this Town Talk, Huck shares the details of the Turkey Egg Hunt, the Christmas Parade, and the Christmas Bazaar, all happening in Downtown Front Royal.

Town Talk is a series on the Royal Examiner where we will introduce you to local entrepreneurs, businesses, non-profit leaders, and political figures who influence Warren County. Topics will be varied but hopefully interesting. If you have an idea, topic, or want to hear from someone in our community, let us know. Send your request to news@RoyalExaminer.com

The Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce announces the 2020 Christmas Parade.  The festive annual event will be held on Saturday, December 5th at 4 p.m.

Due to COVID-19, this year’s parade route has been changed to allow for better social distancing and to prevent crowding in the village commons (gazebo) area.   Parade line-up begins at 3 pm on Stonewall Drive.  The parade will turn onto Commerce Ave. and proceed to 8th Street, disbanding at Bing Crosby Stadium.

“We’re excited to once again coordinate this wonderful community event,” said Niki Foster, President of the Front Royal-Warren County Chamber of Commerce.  “Much thought, consideration, and research have gone into the decision to move forward with this year’s Christmas Parade.  Given the current pandemic, we have made adjustments to help provide a safer experience for attendees.  We encourage everyone to practice social distancing and comply with all CDC guidelines while enjoying this festive local activity.    Holiday activities like the Christmas Parade are a great way to connect business and community.  We hope everyone will come out and enjoy all the wonder and excitement of the Christmas Parade safely.”

Those wishing to participate can download the application here, call the Chamber at 540-635-3185, or email info@frontroyalchamber.com for an application or more information.

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King Cartoons

Front Royal
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Upcoming Events

Nov
20
Fri
all-day Gobble Till You Wobble Virtual 5k @ Online Event
Gobble Till You Wobble Virtual 5k @ Online Event
Nov 20 – Nov 29 all-day
Gobble Till You Wobble Virtual 5k @ Online Event
Take part in the 1st annual Gobble Till You Wobble United Way Virtual 5K Run/Walk. Capture your run or walk using a fitness tracker or app and submit for a chance to win gift cards and[...]
Nov
27
Fri
7:00 pm Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Love Revival – FREE Monthly Comm... @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Nov 27 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Love Revival - FREE Monthly Community Dinner @ Love Revival Ministry Center
Free Community Dinner for everyone! Come enjoy a hot meal on the last Friday of every month at Love Revival Ministry Center.
Nov
28
Sat
all-day Small Business Saturday @ Front Royal, Virginia
Small Business Saturday @ Front Royal, Virginia
Nov 28 all-day
Small Business Saturday @ Front Royal, Virginia
Why should Small Business Saturday just be celebrated on the Saturday after Thanksgiving? Buy Local – Shop Local – Eat Local – Support Front Royal’s Small Business Community and stay local! Small Business Saturdays –[...]
10:00 am Christmas Tree Embroidery Class @ Downtown Market
Christmas Tree Embroidery Class @ Downtown Market
Nov 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Christmas Tree Embroidery Class @ Downtown Market
Learn how to embroider a Christmas tree using basic embroidery stitches – no craft or sewing experience needed! The finished tree can be displayed in the embroidery hoop. This class is appropriate for adults and[...]
Nov
29
Sun
all-day 2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Gr... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Gr... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Nov 29 all-day
2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Grant Application @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Front Royal Women’s Resource Center (FRWRC) Beginning on November 1, 2020, to accept Applications for 2021 DARE TO DREAM GRANTS (Take classes, start a business, purchase a computer, learn a new skill, train for a[...]
Dec
5
Sat
all-day Small Business Saturday @ Front Royal, Virginia
Small Business Saturday @ Front Royal, Virginia
Dec 5 all-day
Small Business Saturday @ Front Royal, Virginia
Why should Small Business Saturday just be celebrated on the Saturday after Thanksgiving? Buy Local – Shop Local – Eat Local – Support Front Royal’s Small Business Community and stay local! Small Business Saturdays –[...]
7:00 am 64th Annual Pancake Day @ Warren County High School
64th Annual Pancake Day @ Warren County High School
Dec 5 @ 7:00 am – 1:00 pm
64th Annual Pancake Day @ Warren County High School
The Kiwanis Club of Front Royal is celebrating its 75 anniversary this year and are committed to holding the annual Pancake Day fundraising event. This event raises significant funds which are put back directly into[...]
7:00 pm Rotary Club Cash Fair @ Online Event
Rotary Club Cash Fair @ Online Event
Dec 5 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Rotary Club Cash Fair @ Online Event
It’s that time of year for Rotary Club of Front Royal’s annual Cash Fair, and we are going virtual this year due to COVID. This is one of our biggest fundraisers of the year and[...]
Dec
6
Sun
all-day 2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Gr... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Gr... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Dec 6 all-day
2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Grant Application @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Front Royal Women’s Resource Center (FRWRC) Beginning on November 1, 2020, to accept Applications for 2021 DARE TO DREAM GRANTS (Take classes, start a business, purchase a computer, learn a new skill, train for a[...]
Dec
13
Sun
all-day 2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Gr... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Gr... @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Dec 13 all-day
2021 Dare to Dream Enrichment Grant Application @ Front Royal Women’s Resource Center
Front Royal Women’s Resource Center (FRWRC) Beginning on November 1, 2020, to accept Applications for 2021 DARE TO DREAM GRANTS (Take classes, start a business, purchase a computer, learn a new skill, train for a[...]