Connect with us

Local Government

Town ponders blighted structures, Valley Health financial contribution, and more…

Published

on

Town Manager Joe Waltz leads another goal setting session. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

The Front Royal Town Council work session held on September 3rd continued the discussion of goal setting with the following topics: Property Maintenance; Valley Health PILOT (Payment In Lieu Of Taxes) fees related to its new hospital; as well as reducing the cost of Town Government operations and Public Relations.

Councilman Eugene Tewalt propelled the Property Maintenance issue forward in recent years primarily to target dilapidated buildings being allowed to deteriorate by property owners. Council has been debating code change and enforcement for years, a primary stumbling block being the cost of enforcement.

Work session discussion indicated that the Board of Zoning Appeals has little interest in playing referee in Town disputes with impacted property owners. Councilman Tewalt suggested applying state code standards to town structures and moving forward on that authority.

A council consensus appeared to have staff draft a code policy within the next 90 days.

Valley Health PILOT fees
Also on the work session agenda was implementation of a PILOT fee compensation to the Town for its permitting of Valley Health’s new Warren Memorial Hospital project. After it was brought to their attention by citizens during the hospital zoning and financing discussion, council decided they could move forward with a PILOT fee condition based on the history between the City of Winchester and Valley Health’s flagship Winchester Medical Center.

Council met with Winchester officials in March of 2019 for background on its PILOT arrangement with Valley Health and Winchester Medical Center. An agreement was made in which Valley Health pays the City of Winchester a certain percent of Winchester Medical Center’s profits in PILOT fees.

Council hopes to have a plan in place by January 1, 2020.

Other discussion
Interim Mayor Tederick told council, “I just don’t think we do public relations well at all, it’s fragmented, there’s not a real concerted effort to spread information. I’m not interested in having another department responsible for media relations, but I think we do need another person who can provide good communications with the public.”

Council decided to pursue citing or establishing a staff position as a point of reference for the Town in its relationship with its citizens. It is again hoped to have a plan in place by the turn of the year.

Todd C. Jones, Director of Information Technology explains “phishing” campaigns going around Town.

Another item covered in the work session was an overview of cyber security presented by the Department of Information Technology (IT). IT has been training town staff about malevolent online “phishing” campaigns taking place since 2006 and will continue to move forward on how to identify legitimate emails from fake emails.

It is an ongoing problem that has seen IT staff identify past attempts to access town systems. Staff briefed council on a plan to help mitigate the problem. It will include running members of council and staff through testing involving fake phishing emails to test their ability to differentiate between good and bad emails.

Robert Brown, Town Engineer listens as Vice Mayor Sealock discusses the left turn lane on John Marshall Highway.

Council also discussed the planning needed for a potential left turn lane on John Marshal Highway by Walker Avenue. The plan is to create a thru lane, using the existing eastbound lane as a turn lane to facilitate traffic flow in an often congested area.

Vice-Mayor William Sealock brought the issue forward stating, “At the start of school and the end of school is the problem, when those cars are backed up, you have to go around them – isn’t that illegal without a lane? I want a legal lane to allow cars to legally do what they’re doing.”

The cost estimate based on VDOT projections is $468,000.

Overhead view of proposed turn lane at Walker Ave and John Marshall Highway.

Again cost appeared to be a stumbling block for implementation. Council decided to plan the project in-house in an attempt to cut costs. A time frame for the project and in-house cost estimate are hoped to be on the table within a month.

See these discussions in this Royal Examiner video:

Share the News:

Local Government

Sign, sign everywhere a sign

Published

on

This is the season where political signs are everywhere. Questions have been asked about these signs. The answers in this conversation with Warren County Zoning Administrator Joe Petty and Front Royal Zoning Administrator Jeremy Camp. They are in the Royal Examiner studio with our publisher Mike McCool.

Share the News:
Continue Reading

EDA in Focus

EDA – Do we want something different? Now is the time to say

Published

on

Councilman Jacob Meza updates Council on the latest from the EDA Reform Committee meeting. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

“Do we want something different? Now is the time to say, ” said Councilman Jacob Meza.

At the Front Royal Town Council work session on September 16, 2019, Councilman Meza gave an update from the recent EDA Reform Committee meeting. During this discussion, Mayor Matt Tederick brought up the probability of the Town to create its own Economic Development Authority. He said that it would not be uncommon as other communities in Virginia have established such entities.

EDA Reform Committee receives audit update; reviews properties

The discussion continued concerning the “double” draws from the Towns line of credit. Mayor Tederick said, “As soon as the Town was aware of the transaction, Town officials reported to the proper authorities of what gave the appearance of something inappropriate.” He went on and said, “We’re not paying for it. Town citizens are not paying for that money.”

Mayor Tederick makes it clear – “We’re not paying for it. Town citizens are not paying for that money.”

Councilman Chris Holloway ask Town Attorney Doug Napier, “If the bank mistakenly puts a million dollars in my bank account and I spend it, is it criminal?”

Vice-Mayor Sealock informed Councilman Meza to watch his words concerning the Police Department project, “The Police Department is not finished. There is a major punch list.” Councilman Meza clarified his words.

Town Council members went into a closed meeting to consult with legal counsel and staff regarding “probable litigation,” as well as to discuss and consider “performance, demotion, salaries, disciplining, or resignation of specific public officers, appointees, or employees of Town Council,” according to the agenda.

Watch the discussion on this Royal Examiner video:

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local Government

Personnel items at forefront of supervisors last meeting of September

Published

on

‘You say you want a revolution’ – well the James Wood Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution staged one to celebrate the 232nd ‘Birthday’ of the U.S. Constitution at Tuesday’s Warren County Board of Supervisors meeting. Royal Examiner Photos/Roger Bianchini. Video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

At its meeting of Tuesday evening, September 17, the Warren County Board of Supervisors announced the contracting of an interim county attorney; the pending departure of County Finance Director Andre Fletcher, and the reappointment of George Cline Jr. to a new four-year term on the County Board of Building Code Appeals.

The attorney and Cline announcements came after a 15 minute closed session near the meeting’s end. Fletcher’s resignation, effective October 18, was announced by County Administrator Doug Stanley during his report to the board. Fletcher is leaving for a job at the Prince William County Sheriff’s Office where he has previously worked, Stanley said.

Jason Ham, who represented the County Board of Building Code Appeals at last week’s Buracker Construction-Kristie Atwood Building Code Appeals hearing, was present in departed County Attorney Dan Whitten’s seat during Tuesday’s meeting. Ham confirmed to media following the meeting that he works for Litten & Sipe LLP which is the firm contracted to handle the County’s legal responsibilities on an interim basis pending the hiring of a full-time replacement for Whitten.

Jason Ham may not have had a name tag Tuesday, but the attorney’s firm of Litten & Sipe has been named to provide interim county attorney services pending selection of a permanent replacement for Dan Whitten.

Whitten’s final day officially was September 13, though he indicated last week he might actually work through the weekend. Whitten left the county attorney’s position here to take the county attorney’s job in Prince George County, Virginia. Whitten was elevated to the County’s top legal job upon the retirement of Blair Mitchell in the spring of 2016.

Assistant county attorney at the time, Whitten was appointed interim county attorney on May 1, 2016, then named county attorney four months later on September 1. His tenure at the top of the County, and consequently the EDA, legal hierarchy overlapped the evolution of a number of EDA projects begun during his predecessor’s term that are now key elements in the EDA financial fraud investigation and consequent civil litigation.

Those include the ITFederal project at the EDA’s Royal Phoenix Business Park now listed as the vehicle for a fraudulently-acquired $10 million loan from the EDA and the Workforce Housing Project now written off as $640,000 loss begun in 2014 as a $10 gift to the EDA from the former EDA executive director’s uncle and aunt; then purchased by the EDA for $445,000 in April 2017; and then sold to representatives of a regional developer for $10 in late November 2018* – wasn’t it fun, Dan?

Dan Whitten may have been trying to tap out at his final appearance as EDA attorney, at the EDA Special Meeting called for September 10. Come on, Dan – always remember the good times …

Fletcher was appointed interim finance director on September 1, 2016, the same day Whitten had the “interim” removed from his title; and had that word removed from his job description on April 1, 2017. Fletcher replaced Kathleen Dellinger who held the position for just over a year following the April 30, 2015 retirement of long-time County Finance Director Carolyn Stimmel. Stimmel has enjoyed her retirement by continuing to periodically help out around the Warren County Government Center, and even more excitingly this year, at the EDA office – isn’t retirement a blast, Carolyn?

Coincidentally on Tuesday, County Human Resources Director Jodi Saffelle gave an update on the status of implementation of Phase One of a Compensation Plan in the wake of a consultant’s compensation study of county government employee salary levels both internally and compared to surrounding jurisdictions.

While the current cost estimate of $321,886 and change is nearly $22,000 above the amount authorized by the board for Phase One implementation, Saffelle reported that “staff anticipates savings that will keep the funding well within the approved range of $300,000.”

Among the variables impacting those savings are changes at the top of several Constitutional Office departments. Among those are Treasurer, Sheriff, Circuit Court Clerk and Commonwealth’s Attorney, all of which had retirements, two (Circuit Court Clerk Daryl Funk and Commonwealth’s Attorney Brian Madden) to judicial appointments, at the top position within the last year.
The fifth county constitutional officer is the commissioner of the revenue, who has not retired – have you, Sherry?

And speaking of constitutional offices, on Tuesday the supervisors unanimously approved a joint request by Sheriff Michael Arnold and Interim Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Layton to move the County’s Victim-Witness Coordinator’s position from the sheriff’s to the commonwealth attorney’s office.

Interim Commonwealth’s Attorney Bryan Layton and Sheriff Michael Arnold listen as their request to transfer authority for the Victim-Witness Coordinator’s position to the CA’s Office is explained by County Human Resources Director Jodi Saffelle.

Human Resources Director Saffelle’s summary of the request noted Sheriff Arnold’s observation that most jurisdictions place that position within the auspices of the commonwealth attorney’s office. Examples offered were Clarke, Fauquier, Frederick, Shenandoah and Page Counties and the City of Winchester – well, that pretty much has us surrounded.

It was also noted that the position, which is currently vacant here, is enabled through a grant awarded to the County by the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services. Saffelle told the supervisors that Sheriff Arnold, Layton and County Administrator Doug Stanley were working with the grant administrator to assure the change, if approved, would be reported to the proper state administrative sources, so as not to interfere with the grant process in coming years.

There may only be 13 stars on it but don’t let that flag hit the ground either. Sons of the American Revolution James Wood Chapter President Dale Corey, right, gives a little context to the Dr. Joseph Warren plaque presentation to county officials.

Tuesday’s meeting got off to a colorful start with the presentation of a Dr. Joseph Warren informational plaque for the Warren County Government Center commemorating the Revolutionary War figure for whom the county is named. As noted by Larry Johnson in prefacing the presentation, similar plaques have been place in all nine county public schools as an educational initiative.

It was noted by members of the James Wood Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution that the presentation was being made on the “Birthday of the American Constitution”. It was on September 17, 1787 that the Constitutional Convention that saw the writing and signing of the U.S. Constitution came to a close in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Items included the presentation by Johnson, Chapter President Dale Corey, Ned Farenholtz and Dale Carpenter referenced Dr. Joseph Warren of Massachusetts as a “forgotten Founding Father” who might have been president of the young nation had he not been targeted and killed by the British at the Battle of Bunker Hill.

See this entertaining, informational and colorful start to Tuesday’s meeting and the rest of the county business conducted in this linked Royal Examiner video:

Larry Johnson may be warning of possible British loyalists in the crowd as he leads the way to a 232nd anniversary celebration of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 2019.

* FOOTNOTE: Whitten did not act as EDA legal counsel on that Nov. 28, 2018 Workforce Housing parcel sale, having recused due to a County-EDA conflict of interest. Local real estate attorney Joe Silek Jr. represented the ED

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local Government

Town Engineer presents South Street Traffic Study update to Council

Published

on

Town Engineer Robert Brown leads the discussion on the draft South Street study. Photo and video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

At the Front Royal Town Council meeting on September 23, 2019, Council will approve a budget amendment in the amount of $2,823.09 to accept funds from Edward Greco for the CDBG façade improvement program related to 109 E Main Street. The funds obtained from Mr. Greco and the funds from the Community Development Block Grant will be used to pay the contractor for the façade improvement program.

As the Town moves forward with façade improvements, future budget amendments will need to be approved in order for the Town to accept the funds from the property owners. The amounts
required to be paid by the property owners are dependent on the amount of bid being awarded, so the Town will be unable to process the budget amendments in advance. Budget amendments

will need to be processed as the bids are awarded.

In November of 2015, VDOT completed a draft version of a planning level corridor study of South Street between the intersections with Royal Avenue and Commerce Avenue.

At the request of the Town of Front Royal, Virginia, VDOT Staunton District Planning initiated a planning level corridor study in the Spring of 2015 along South Street (Route 55) between the intersections with Royal Avenue (US 340) and Commerce Avenue (US 522). The Town wants to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of a Road Diet improvement along South Street, in order to enhance multimodal safety and operations along the corridor, as well as aesthetic enhancements. A Road Diet is a practice where vehicular travel lanes are eliminated in order to provide multimodal enhancements such as bike lanes and improved sidewalks along the roadway, in order to improve safety for all users of the corridor.

Where existing pavement and right‐of‐way widths permit, a Road Diet may also incorporate medians for improved pedestrian crossings and landscaping. In order to effectively evaluate a Road Diet improvement along the corridor, the study also analyzes a future No Build scenario and an Access Management improvement scenario as alternatives to the Road Diet improvement.

At the September 16, 2019 Town Council work session, Town Engineer Robert Brown presented a summary of suggestions to the Council.

Watch the discussion of these two items in this Royal Examiner video:

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local Government

Town Council updated on downtown, revenue-sharing projects

Published

on

The CDBG project activities include the design and construction of a pavilion and public restrooms on the Town Plaza costing $219,680. Photo courtesy Town of Front Royal. Video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

FRONT ROYAL — Infrastructure improvement projects and downtown revitalization work, both partially funded by the state, are progressing, said Front Royal staff during the Front Royal Town Council’s Monday night work session.

Town Engineer Robert Brown said that Town staff has applied to the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) for revenue-sharing funds that would pay half of the total costs of three local infrastructure improvement projects.

If approved, the funding would become available in fiscal year 2021, Brown said.

“All three projects have made it through the pre-screening process and the next step is to complete the application,” Brown told Town Council members, who now must pass a resolution in support of the projects to get the application filed by the October 1 deadline.

The three projects are:

  1. To mill and repave both the northbound and southbound lanes of N. Royal Avenue from W. 14th Street to Commerce Avenue;
  2. Removing the wooden deck on the Prospect Street bridge and replacing it with a concrete deck, installing VDOT-compliant railings, and repaving both approaches; and
  3. Replacing the roughly 18 decorative acorn street light poles along N. Shenandoah Avenue from 14th Street to the South Fork bridge with 30’ overhead lights matching those already installed on the bridges.

Brown said the N. Royal Avenue paving project’s total cost is $208,000 with the Town match being $104,000. The Prospect Street bridge repairs would cost $200,000 with the Town match being half of that amount, he said, and the N. Shenandoah Avenue project’s total price tag is $265,000 with the Town match being $132,500.

Town Council members agreed with the staff’s recommendation to consider the resolution at its next regular meeting, which is September 23.

Jeremy Camp, director of Front Royal’s Planning and Zoning department, updated Town Council on the status of several project activities that are part of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, which are federal funds administered by the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development.

The Town was originally awarded a $700,000 grant for economic development, specifically for revitalization of the downtown area. “We’ve focused on the short-term plans because the grant was only $700,000,” Camp said, adding that the Town currently is in the CDBG implementation stage of the grant, which runs through September 25, 2020.

The CDBG project activities include the design and construction of a pavilion and public restrooms on the Town Plaza costing $219,680. All plans must be submitted by December and construction is scheduled to begin in March 2020 with most of the project finished mid-summer next year, said Camp.

Another CDBG project is the Façade Improvement Program to assist downtown property owners in restoring their building facades by giving out so-called grant funds, which Camp said the owners would have to match by at least 50 percent of a project’s total cost.

Construction is slated to start next month on Round 1A of the Façade Improvement Program, which has two more rounds with construction beginning and ending at different intervals next year. Round 1A construction is set to end in January 2020.

“Staff is actively speaking with contractors to raise awareness and interest in bidding on the projects,” said Camp, who noted that related advertising is being done via social media, news outlets, flyers, and the Chamber of Commerce, among others.

In a related item, Town Finance Director B.J. Wilson requested that Town Council approve a budget amendment in the amount of $2,823.09 to accept funds from Edward Greco for the CDBG façade improvement program related to 109 E Main Street.

The funds obtained from Greco and the funds from the CDBG will be used to pay the contractor for the façade improvement program, Wilson explained, noting that as the Town moves forward with façade improvements, future budget amendments will need to be approved in order for the Town to accept the funds from the property owners.

The amounts required to be paid by the property owners are dependent on the amount of bid being awarded, so the Town will be unable to process the budget amendments in advance, Wilson said, adding that the budget amendments will need to be processed as the bids are awarded.

Following the discussion of other agenda items — including a draft traffic study for South Street and an update from Councilman Jacob Meza on his attendance at the recent EDA Reform Committee meeting —Town Council members went into a closed meeting to consult with legal counsel and staff regarding “probable litigation,” as well as to discuss and consider “performance, demotion, salaries, disciplining, or resignation of specific public officers, appointees, or employees of Town Council,” according to the agenda.

EDA Reform Committee receives audit update; reviews properties

Interim Mayor Matthew Tederick told the Royal Examiner that no announcements would be made regarding the closed meeting.

Also in attendance at the work session were Vice Mayor William Sealock; Councilman Gary Gillispie; Councilman Chris Holloway; Town Attorney Douglas Napier; Councilman Eugene Tewalt; Councilwoman Letasha Thompson; Town Manager Joe Waltz; and Clerk of Council Jennifer Berry.

Share the News:
Continue Reading

Local Government

County Building Code Appeals Board reduces Atwood violations to five

Published

on

Buracker Construction attorney T. Joel Francis makes his clients’ case as they and others listen. Royal Examiner Photos/Roger Bianchini. Video by Mark Williams, Royal Examiner.

A second Warren County Building Code violations appeal go-round between local builder Buracker Construction and disgruntled home construction client Kristie Atwood on Tuesday, September 10, resulted in a similar result to a first appeal go round in 2018.

That result was a reduction from six to five determined code violations on the Atwood home construction project; as well as a promised appeal to the state review level by Buracker attorney T. Joel Francis on those five Warren County Building Code Appeals Board violations rulings. Atwood had claimed 60 violations based on an independent contractor inspection 12 to 14 months after she moved in to the new home.

The dispute revolves around Buracker Construction’s 2016 building of Atwood’s replacement home on Pilgrim’s Way in Bentonville. Atwood lost her previous home to fire.

In 2016 the County Building Code Department inspected the home upon completion, found no violations and a Certificate of Occupancy was issued on July 19, 2016. Fourteen months later after having moved in Atwood contracted a home inspection company not licensed in Warren County which reported 60 alleged code violations. Upon its first review the County Building Code Appeals Board initially cited 12 potential code violations, a number eventually reduced to six and Tuesday down to five.

A first appeal to the state level of that ruling resulted in the case being returned due to a conflict of interest determination. David Buracker, principal of Buracker Construction is on the county appeals board but recused himself from the case. The conflict was alleged by Atwood with Appeals Board member George Cline Jr. Buracker had sub-contracted Cline to fix those initial code violation determinations when Atwood refused to let Buracker to do the work. She claimed the Buracker Construction company wasn’t licensed in the county.

That led to a somewhat convoluted back and forth during a July hearing in which County Building Code Official David Beahm noted that Buracker himself and a related contracting LLC run by Martha Buracker were licensed. Beahm claimed the state typically allowed such licensing arrangements leading to his approval of Buracker to build in Warren County. Atwood disagreed and would not allow Buracker to engage in repair work or subcontract the repair work out to Cline.

When Cline participated in the 2018 county appeals board review, the conflict of interest claim was lodged by Atwood, leading to Tuesday’s board review of its initial ruling when Cline participated. Only appeals board members Arthur Saffelle, Dan Hotek and Wendell Hatcher participated in Tuesday’s hearing.

Buracker attorney Francis questioned Atwood’s motivation. He noted that the appeals board’s authority came down to ruling on violations and authorizing fixes of those violations.

“What’s the remedy – a violation is determined and has to be fixed or the responsible party has to pay to have it fixed,” Francis told the board, adding that he believed Atwood “is not looking for a fix, she is looking for a windfall – and that’s not coming from this board … That’s why we have judges … and I don’t think any of you want to be judges,” Francis told the board, drawing some smiles.

“I am not looking for a windfall,” Atwood responded during her rebuttal to the Buracker case. She pointed to the licensing issue which she said left her with no remedy from the state level, adding, “I’m screwed all the way around.”

Kristie Atwood denies she is out for a ‘windfall’ from complaints issued about her home construction about a year after she moved in to it.

She then attacked County Building Official Beahm – “I’m calling him out, he’s not doing his job … the board of supervisors should have fired him; it’s not just me. What if someone’s house burns down and kills them all? There are lives on the line and he shouldn’t be allowed to get away with it.”

The three-person board quorum then launched into discussion of its authority and perception of the building issues under review. Hotek and Hatcher agreed to uphold the board’s earlier ruling on five of the six violations found with Cline participating. So it would seem Atwood did better with the allegedly conflicted board member than without.

Board Chairman Saffelle dissented on the violations, stating he felt the determinations fell beyond the board’s authority.

A 10-minute recess was called to allow appeals board attorney Jason Ham to craft a Resolution reflecting the board decision. That decision by the 2-1 majority was that items referred to as numbers 3, 4, 7, 10 and 12 remained code violations as they stood by the 2009 Uniform State Building Code. Two related to work around a fireplace, the other four outside deck support.

Dan Hotek and Wendell Hatcher, seated left to right, review Resolution on the County Building Code Appeals Board 2-1 decision drafted by attorney Jason Ham, standing.

The Royal Examiner’s camera was there:

Share the News:
Continue Reading

King Cartoons

Get Your Zombie Walk Shirt

Front Royal
74°
Rain Shower
07:0019:09 EDT
Feels like: 74°F
Wind: 4mph W
Humidity: 78%
Pressure: 30.16"Hg
UV index: 0
SatSunMon
min 63°F
90/68°F
90/59°F

Upcoming Events

Sep
21
Sat
all-day Huge Annual Yard Sale @ YARD SALE
Huge Annual Yard Sale @ YARD SALE
Sep 21 all-day
Huge Annual Yard Sale @ YARD SALE
Huge Annual Yard Sale, Sept 19 – 21 Location: 136 Passage Manor Drive, Strasburg, VA Flash Sale: Thursday: 10am – 2pm  |  Friday: 8am – 2pm  |  Saturday: 9am – 1pm
Sep
23
Mon
6:30 pm Monument to Mosby’s Men @ Front Royal's Prospect Hill Cemetery
Monument to Mosby’s Men @ Front Royal's Prospect Hill Cemetery
Sep 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Monument to Mosby's Men @ Front Royal's Prospect Hill Cemetery
The Col. John S. Mosby Camp, SCV, will lead the annual ceremony at the Monument to Mosby’s Men, 6:30pm on September 23rd, at Front Royal’s Prospect Hill Cemetery. Past Camp Commander Richard W. Hoover will[...]
Sep
24
Tue
1:30 pm Watercolor Landscapes @ Art in the Valley
Watercolor Landscapes @ Art in the Valley
Sep 24 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Watercolor Landscapes @ Art in the Valley
This four week course with instructor Elena Maza will focus on learning basic skills to create watercolor landscape paintings: basic composition and use of color and value to create a sense of depth and distance.[...]
Sep
25
Wed
8:00 am Senior Safety & Health Expo @ Moose Lodge
Senior Safety & Health Expo @ Moose Lodge
Sep 25 @ 8:00 am – 1:00 pm
Senior Safety & Health Expo @ Moose Lodge
The purpose of the Expo is to keep our seniors safer and healthier, and to strengthen communication between the law enforcement and senior communities. And have some fun and fellowship along the way! Topics may[...]
10:30 am Children’s Art Class “Back to Sc... @ Art in the Valley
Children’s Art Class “Back to Sc... @ Art in the Valley
Sep 25 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm
Children's Art Class "Back to School" Session @ Art in the Valley
We are offering classes for children ages 7-12 who would enjoy expressing themselves through art. The students will expand their creative side with drawing, painting and constructing, using various mediums such as acrylic, pastels, watercolor[...]
11:30 am Women In Networking @ Middle of Main
Women In Networking @ Middle of Main
Sep 25 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Women In Networking @ Middle of Main
Guest Speaker: Samantha Barber Topic: Voice for the Voiceless THIS IS A FREE EVENT – Please join us and other women looking to be inspired! “More than just another networking group.” FRWRC WIN is open[...]
1:30 pm Botanical Drawing @ Art in the Valley
Botanical Drawing @ Art in the Valley
Sep 25 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Botanical Drawing @ Art in the Valley
Learn and practice the art of botanical drawing in pencil with local artist and instructor Elena Maza. This four session course will focus on learning basic drawing skills as applied to botanicals: basic line drawings[...]
Sep
26
Thu
12:30 pm Watercolor Painting Essentials @ Art in the Valley
Watercolor Painting Essentials @ Art in the Valley
Sep 26 @ 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Watercolor Painting Essentials @ Art in the Valley
This class will teach you the necessities to create your own watercolor paintings. Setup of materials and proper studio techniques will be shown. Indispensable ideas about drawing and color mixing as well as paint application[...]
4:00 pm Sketching with Pencils @ Art in the Valley
Sketching with Pencils @ Art in the Valley
Sep 26 @ 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Sketching with Pencils @ Art in the Valley
Pencil sketching is a great way to capture a visual record of your experiences and ideas. This class will give students a strong foundation for making pencil images for a journal or sketchbook. Principles for[...]
Sep
27
Fri
10:00 am The Fundamentals of Oil Painting @ Art in the Valley
The Fundamentals of Oil Painting @ Art in the Valley
Sep 27 @ 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
The Fundamentals of Oil Painting @ Art in the Valley
This class will focus on proven approaches for successful oil paintings. Subject matter will be the student’s choice. No previous painting experience with oils necessary. The class will introduce students to fundamental concepts of color[...]